It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

USAF E-11A down in Afghanistan

page: 3
10
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 04:24 PM
link   
a reply to: RadioRobert

It's possible, but has the VIP claim been confirmed? The only places I've seen it have tied back to Iranian sources. The fact that they only recovered two bodies, and no one is saying anything about more passengers or crew makes me think it was a training flight or an FCF with only the flight crew on board. Or maybe repositioning for maintenance.



edit on 1/28/2020 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 1/28/2020 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 05:07 PM
link   
I'd consider all the accounts, including the unnamed US official statements, as highly suspect under the circumstances, that's all.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 11:05 PM
link   
a reply to: Sthrndream

Ahh 1C5 here



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 12:33 AM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: RadioRobert

It's possible, but has the VIP claim been confirmed? The only places I've seen it have tied back to Iranian sources. The fact that they only recovered two bodies, and no one is saying anything about more passengers or crew makes me think it was a training flight or an FCF with only the flight crew on board. Or maybe repositioning for maintenance.




Thats where my head was, it only said 2 bodies were found, not 2 found and 2 missing. So perhaps there were only 2 on board.

What is normal crew for one of these on operations (does it have stations)?

Sounds like the aircraft works autonomously and a global hawk has the same type of equipment.

Why would it have VIPs on board, thats not its role?
edit on 29 1 2020 by Forensick because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 12:49 AM
link   
a reply to: Forensick

Normal crew is 4-8.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 05:07 PM
link   
According to statements the aircraft was at 42,000 feet and radioed a mayday.

There was an unconfirmed report of an Air Force C-27J crashing the same day, but the AF doesn't operate the C-27J. The thinking is possibly a UC-27B. But it still hasn't been confirmed.

theaviationist.com...



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 06:00 PM
link   
Lt. Col. Paul Voss and Capt Ryan Phaneuf.

taskandpurpose.com...



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 09:42 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

You've got this (C-27, frequently used by SOCOM in the theater) and the VOA report of five dead in the crash. There's a lot floating around which hints we may not be getting the full story. And probably won't.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

maybe i missed it but why was Iran saying all their nonsense ? like 12 dead(i dont think you could fit 12 people + equip in any safe way) Iranian VIPs etc.


i was on a gulf stream earlier today and i know they arent the same aircraft but there is NO way there were more than 4 people on there.

what happened to the other 2 people?



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 08:36 PM
link   
a reply to: penroc3

It was either an FCF or training flight with just flight crew.. Counting this aircraft, all four Global 6000s the Air Force owns are in Afghanistan. So when they get new volunteers to fly them they have to train in country.



posted on Jan, 21 2021 @ 05:14 PM
link   
A fan blade separated from the left engine N1 first stage turbofan after the crew increased power to climb to a higher altitude. The CVR stopped recording afterwards, and the DFDR data was limited, but a similar event in another Global Express resulted in vibrations so bad that stemware in the galley broke. The vibration on this aircraft were 25% stronger. The throttles were moved in a manner consistent with attempting to determine which engine failed, and the right engine was shut down. Shortly after, the vibrations decreased.

The Master Caution activated, along with an L FADEC FAIL warning. Three possible consequences of that are listed in the checklist, one of which is engine shutdown. An ENGINE SYNC FAIL warning also lit, as well as an audible warning for the autothrottle being deactivated.

Civilian crews in a similar emergency took 1-2 minutes to analyze the situation and take action, while the Mishap Crew shut down the right engine 24 seconds after the initial blade failure. Based on simulations, the crew had 2 minutes to glide to Kabul, and could have reached FOB Shank, but after realizing they couldn't reach Kabul, attempted to reach FOB Sharana which was outside the aircraft's capabilities with both engines out. The crew notified Kandahar ATC that their intent was to land at KAF, which indicated they were confident they would be able to restart at least one engine.

www.airforcemag.com...



posted on Jan, 21 2021 @ 05:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

They shut down the good engine by mistake. RIP.



new topics

top topics



 
10
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join