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Corona Virus Updates

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posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:08 PM
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a reply to: TheAMEDDDoc

So, meds like ibuprofen and aspirin are not good to take?




posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:09 PM
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a reply to: Navieko

Also, the Lancet study was done on 41 patients who were severely ill enough to be admitted to the hospital to begin with.

41 is not a good sample size, and only the most severely ill patients present to the hospital for treatment.

So it would be more accurate to say that if you get to the hospital, your chances of death go up to 15%.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:10 PM
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If the Virus hits my area I'll post this on my front door. Should keep the neighbors away.




posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

These are not immunosuppressants. Can't cause any harm fighting off viruses.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: TheAMEDDDoc

Yeah well, rehabbing frozen shoulder and a SLAP tear ain't no picnic.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT

originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: IAMTAT
Medical question for medical types...
Will individuals currently fighting another variety of flu have more or less resistance to this particular CV?




Less.

If your immune system is weakened by the flu and you get a different strain, the IGG/IGM white blood cells won't be "programmed" to fight the new strain.


Thanks.
So...cold & flu season is NOT a good time of the year for a catastrophic pandemic.


It would become an issue.
edit on 26-1-2020 by DBCowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:14 PM
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I think this whole thing shows us just how we can don't know as much as we like to believe. In the last century health care has come a long way from ice pick lobotomy. And similarly other surgical techniques have jumped leaps and bounds. But when it comes down to actual medicine, I don't feel like we've really made as big of jump. The diseases we couldn't cure 50 years ago, we still for the biggest part, cannot cure. We understand how these diseases spread and how to prevent them, but not how to cure them. Think about it, we still do not even have a cure for the common cold.

I really hope this isn't true but I think development has been stifled by a couple of things. (I know I'll take flak for this) but for one, religion, we don't want to use stem cells because we don't want to 'play god' and I get that to a certain extent, but if we have the opportunity to cure, really cure people, we should take it.

And two and probably the largest IMHO is business in general. They're no money in cures, and there no cures in money. They primarily search for treatments, which cost ungodly amounts of money. We can cure hepatitis now, but it's like 5k per pill.

Anyway I hope this ends well and is a wake up call.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:14 PM
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My husband moved his when the US took out that Iranian General....good thing.

originally posted by: toysforadults
Get ready to lose your 401ks if they arent in bonds and PMs

Oh boy.. we have our X event forming as we speak

This is going to be a really big year

2020 one to remember



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: TheAMEDDDoc

Can you post a link to study that states this? The fever argument might potentially be true for bacteria, can't see this be a valid argument against viruses.
Immune response is spiking anyway, a pill or two of ibuprofen every 6 hours will barely make a dent in the levels of signalling molecules. Definitely not in a way it would inhibit a body's immune response.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: texasgirl

Tylenol is the best for high fever, especially in children. IV Tylenol is making a comeback for pain relief and prehospital care. Aspirin is ok in adults, never in children. Ibuprofen is great for pain but it can block additional inflammatory signaling pathways.

None of them are bad to take and there is no reason not to take them so you can function, just be aware of hand washing, using your germ pocket etc. Its a balancing act because being in pain and stressed out is not going to help you recover, especially if you can’t sleep.

Many people take multiple of each and then experience toxicity effects, rapid breathing, weird headaches etc and it is tough for doctors to recognize because the patient will just say they took “some.” It’s very challenging to break through subjective information from the patient, that’s why they now teach doctors evidence based medicine techniques like having the patient tell their story and make joint decisions rather than interrupting and forcing a diagnosis.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

You could take NSAIDs (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) there are different ones to help with inflammation:

Ibuprofen (also known as neurofen)
Naproxen (naprosyn)
Diclofenac (voltarol)
Piroxicam (feldene)

And there is Methotrexate which is Disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) which reduces the effects of long term inflammation in arthritis and other inflammatory diseases/causes.

I also guess that it depends on the severity of immune reaction and the strength of the anti-inflammatory. But I also think that to reduce inflammatory response anti-inflammatory needs to be administered sooner the onset rather than later for chances of recovery.

There is also the other underlying conditions we need to take in to consideration such as that persons well-being such as does this person have a compromised immune response due to having other auto-immune diseases for example or do they suffer from other respiratory or heart conditions for example.

edit on 26America/Chicagov19pm131 by deviant300 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:18 PM
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originally posted by: texasgirl
a reply to: TheAMEDDDoc

So, meds like ibuprofen and aspirin are not good to take?


Unless you prefer various types of pain and potentially a heat shock (hyperthermia) I think it's a good idea to take them.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:19 PM
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Got one in Maricopa County now.....Arizona

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: DevolutionEvolvd
Most US cases aren't.

Unless it's changed since this morning, there are only 3: Washington, Illinois, CA. There are a bunch of suspected ones though. Some of those will be real, but a lot will be the usual random colds and flus that spread around this time of year.




posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: Necrose

I could try to find one, it’s something we covered in my public health, pathophysiology and immunology courses. Respiratory viruses replicate more quickly at cooler temperatures.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: deviant300

That's what I meant. I'm taking naproxen regularly at the moment for the shoulder pain to help get me through the physical therapy phase. I usually only use it as needed for migraine.

Tylenol as a straight up pain killer is something I take as little as possible to avoid provoking chronic migraine response.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: Necrose

Heat shock is unlikely, I take NSAIDS and Tylenol lol I have 3 kids I need to function. They just increase infection time. For a heat stroke or seizures there needs to be an electrolyte deficiency, dehydration or fluid shift or extremely high fever. Most febrile seizures in kids are caused by the rapid change in body temperature, up or down, not the fever itself. It’s why they need benzo and additional support in hospital to bring them down with rapid cooling.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: TheAMEDDDoc

Thank you for your answer. I haven't been sick in 20 years and I'm a little concerned about what to do if I do get sick this time. Ive never taken the flu shot.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:27 PM
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well thank the gods I am in Arizona then!!!!


originally posted by: TheAMEDDDoc
a reply to: Necrose

I could try to find one, it’s something we covered in my public health, pathophysiology and immunology courses. Respiratory viruses replicate more quickly at cooler temperatures.



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: TheAMEDDDoc
a reply to: Necrose

I could try to find one, it’s something we covered in my public health, pathophysiology and immunology courses. Respiratory viruses replicate more quickly at cooler temperatures.


Found an article. virologyj.biomedcentral.com...
You're right (strictly speaking) but not applicable in real life.
"At 31°C, there was less replicative RNA synthesis overall than at 37°C and the timing of RNA production appeared to lag by 2 hours (Fig. 1A, compare lanes 2–4 to 6–8). Both m- and vRNA accumulated to equivalent levels with similar timing at 39°C compared to 37°C (Fig. 1A, compare lanes 6–8 to 10–12). However, when infected cells were incubated at 41°C, the levels of segment 5 vRNA were substantially decreased in comparison to those detected at 37°C, while mRNA levels were unchanged (Fig. 1A, compare lanes 6–8 to 14–16). This same trend was seen when radiolabeled primer extension products for five different segments were quantified by densitometry (Fig. 1B). At 41°C on average, segment 5 mRNA accumulation at 5 h.p.i. was unchanged, cRNA accumulation was slightly reduced, but vRNA accumulation dropped by about 3-fold, compared with 37°C incubated cells"

Conclusion: body temp. 33-35 °C is hypothermia and therefore something we wouldn't want anyway. 31°C is a straight up death... 37-39 range makes no difference.
And 41°C well... we all know what happens above 41°C.

Ultimate conclusion: not worth the struggle and pain

Edit: corrected the citation
edit on 26-1-2020 by Necrose because: added link

edit on 26-1-2020 by Necrose because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2020 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I wouldn’t worry about it, the difference is marginal and overall we have a much better public health system than other areas. Plus they are getting much better at treating septic shock and recognizing it early. It’s also an extremely unlikely response compounded by other underlying issues and a systemic inflammatory response they will see very quickly in vital signs.



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