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You're not Boeing to believe this:Yet another software bug found in ill-fated 737 Max airplanes

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posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 06:45 AM
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Not my subjectline but plagiarised form El Reg


Boeing seem to be on a roll lately.

If only faults counted as plus points !!

Full articele here ... www.theregister.co.uk...

"Boeing today said another software flaw has been spotted in its star-crossed 737 Max.

The bug was found during an audit of the passenger jet's on-board technology, held last weekend with America's aviation regulator. These technical reviews are expected to turn up glitches and gremlins for Boeing engineers to fix, so this is kinda to be expected.

The Seattle-based manufacturer told The Register on Friday it was working with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to straighten out the bug. The 737 Max is unlikely to return to the skies until the flaw is addressed.

"We are making necessary updates and working with the FAA on submission of this change, and keeping our customers and suppliers informed," a spokesperson said in a canned statement. "Our highest priority is ensuring the 737 Max is safe and meets all regulatory requirements before it returns to service."

So far, the airliner maker is providing little else in the way of details or descriptions of the issue. So take the following with a pinch of salt.

From what we can tell, and according to ABC News, which cited sources familiar with the case, two of the flight computers stopped communicating with each other during the aircraft's start-up sequence, which normally takes place when the plane is on the ground. This disrupted the power-on monitoring systems. Boeing had just added code to allow the two flight computers to talk to each other – previously they operated more or less independently."




posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 06:54 AM
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You know, my small brain is beginning to think that this is accepted practice in the computer/coding world. Get it out there and fix it later. Who is teaching these people? Or is it industry unteaching them? Somebody somewhere knows this plane was rushed, like everything else, and many, many people died.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 07:49 AM
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Boeing is a government contractor with powerful lobbyists.

Nothing will happen to Boeing. They have the American immunity, like we do when we accidently kill thousands of civilians.

Heck, kill a few and get pardoned.

Boeing will be just fiiiine me thinks. Still no lawsuits, no formal inquiries, very little publicity... Odd



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 09:37 AM
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Few more links here:

Wall STreet Journal

ABC News

AP News

Seattle


The issue is in the plane’s flight-control computer software. It was confined to how it performs validation checks during startup and doesn’t involve its function during flight, the people said. The problem came to light when the latest version of the software was loaded onto an actual aircraft, according to one of the people. While it has been tested on planes in flight, most of the software reviews have occurred in a special simulator used by engineers on the ground.

edit on 20-1-2020 by and14263 because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-1-2020 by and14263 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 11:52 AM
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Due to them linking the computers more directly i'd guess a condition where both systems say hello at the exact same time and there is no cross talk backing off at that point so theres a point where both systems keep trying to say hello but hear gibberish and then wait a set time and try again and again.

Probably easy solved either by a random back off timer so the channel will become clear for one of the node or a small delay between powering on each node, more complex fix would be two single direction lines so theres no cross talk but that gets more messy with failovers but since this is a power on problem and the plane should be on the ground it shouldn't be a major problem to just throw up an error and refuse to fly until someone fixes the problem.

Theres other conditions like shared memory locks but wouldn't of thought they'd be doing that given redundancy requirements.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 01:33 PM
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the MAX is an instable plane design to keep it airborn computertech needed that we will have over 20 years
so all 737 max already builded will in short time be scraped…!
truly ...who will fly with it ! there are just no customers for
ore give them free away to polticians !!!!!!!!!!!
oeps ….trump orderd a new airforce one also by boeing????? even funny 'er
an airbus A380 might have been better







edit on 20-1-2020 by ressiv because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-1-2020 by ressiv because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-1-2020 by ressiv because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: Cymru

the overdangly thrombosed engines mean the plane can't fly without the algorithms, if you want to fly like that, join the airforce..and take your chances.


edit on 20-1-2020 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: ressiv

All modern aircraft need a lot of computer control to keep them airborne. The Max will fly again and will almost certainly go on to become successful.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

Welcome to modern aviation.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 04:48 PM
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Aviation Leak predicting costs associated with the grounding may exceed $12,000,000,000

That's a lot of lettuce. More debt load for Boeing. Cash flow is going to become (or is) a problem.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 04:59 PM
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originally posted by: odzeandennz
Boeing is a government contractor with powerful lobbyists.

Nothing will happen to Boeing. They have the American immunity, like we do when we accidently kill thousands of civilians.

Heck, kill a few and get pardoned.

Boeing will be just fiiiine me thinks. Still no lawsuits, no formal inquiries, very little publicity... Odd


There is an ongoing criminal investigation into the certification process.

There is also a House Transportation Committee investigation still ongoing complete with televised hearings.

Just because it doesn't make the local news where you live, doesn't mean it isn't happening.

Most civil suits will wait until after the other investigations are complete, like normal.

I doubt they'll find enough to hang anyone, but there will be civil suits out the wazoo.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 05:12 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: smurfy

Welcome to modern aviation.


It's more like welcome to the return of the bean counters in a hurry.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

Just about all modern aircraft, especially the fly by wire ones are heavily computer controlled. And it's only going to see more computer requirements. Airbus just flew an A350 under control of their ATTOL program. More than one manufacturer is working toward single pilot operations.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

with companies like boeing putting profit over making the aircraft as dependable as possible that will probably be the day I retire from flying thank god I am closing in on that age when it will be possible.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 05:32 PM
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Someone is hacking these planes and crashing them.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: Starhooker

No, they really aren't.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: smurfy

Just about all modern aircraft, especially the fly by wire ones are heavily computer controlled. And it's only going to see more computer requirements. Airbus just flew an A350 under control of their ATTOL program. More than one manufacturer is working toward single pilot operations.


Look,
Please don't patronise...if Boeing wants autonomous aircraft, that's one thing, but they need to work on it..for a long time.
What you don't do is heavily modify..(heavy..not a mispel..being the operative word after the mods) an aircraft when that modification wasn't ultimately right in the end. Nor did pilots, (if not all) know how to react because they didn't know about how the auto systems MO, in a moment of a faulty sensor failing to provide correct information.
That's not an accident, that's a failure of systems...and definitely, not clever.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

That wasn't being patronizing, it was a simple statement of fact. Computers control aircraft, and will only see more control going forward. Everyone is quick to point at Boeing and only Boeing for these accidents, and conveniently ignore the fact that they flew over half a million flights worldwide with two accidents. Boeing made serious mistakes, but there was a lot more to those accidents than those mistakes.

The Lion Air report found plenty of blame to go around. The MCAS activation was similar to a runaway stabilizer event, which was supposed to be a memory item. The Lion Air captain was handling the aircraft until he gave control to the First Officer, who shouldn't have been in the cockpit to begin with. Boeing deserves plenty of blame, but the entire safety system is broken and needs fixing.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 06:34 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: smurfy

That wasn't being patronizing, it was a simple statement of fact. Computers control aircraft, and will only see more control going forward.


Yes it was, most people now know about a fly-by-wire system, as do they know about the various computer controls in their cars that have the same characteristics.
So, let's look at this tale from Bloomberg, let's accept that it is true and not shoot the messenger, (Bloomberg)..as so often happens around here.


One March 2016 incident closely resembled the recent crashes, except that the plane, an earlier 737-800 model, wasn’t equipped with MCAS and the pilots maintained control.

As soon as the plane got airborne, the captain, seated on the left side, got the loud thumping noise and vibrating control column warning that the plane was about to stall, according to the NASA report. The captain’s airspeed and altitude displays disagreed with the copilot’s, indicating an error and setting off additional alerts. All of those symptoms occurred on the two recent Max crashes.

The pilots opted to continue onto their destination in spite of the multiple failures. Both the captain and the copilot said that they regretted continuing the flight and didn’t realize that they had violated their airline’s procedures by disabling the stall warning.

“A return, while considered, should have been accomplished,” said the captain.

Only after they landed did they realize that the captain’s angle-of-attack vane was bent for unknown reasons.

www.bloomberg.com...



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: smurfy



if Boeing wants autonomous aircraft, that's one thing, but 


It's not autonomous. Every new airliner has a computer flight laws controlling the flight (fly-by-wire). Not just Boeing. You're running out of options if you want to fly computer-free.



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