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US Medical Personnel Shortage

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posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 09:14 PM
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Everyone has cancer. If it doesn't kill you it eventually will. Besides the point but to my point; there is no value in getting handouts and starting a career.

I actually have made a living steamrolling over these kinds of people. One thing I learned, they are not willing to put in the work. No staying up 2-3 days straight to figure out a problem. No working long hours way after everyone has gone home to get an edge for a promotion. They truly believe they will get it just doing the bare minimum.

Warren of all people knows this fact. She is actually a hard worker but is pandering to all the idiots she plowed over to get to where she is today and using them. I honestly though can't blame her for it. I would do the same if I was a politician. Tell the sheep what they want to hear. They are victims. Totally not their fault for being lazy.




posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 09:21 PM
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The problem is funding. A hospital gets alot of patients who either dont pay, or have Medicare.

If you go in for a mammogram, that's like a 1500 dollar exam. How much do you think medicare pays the hospital for that exam? 25 dollars. And that's if we actually see the money. The hospital sends you home with a survey, and the results are tallied at the end of the fiscal year or quarter. If the hospital lags at all in a couple different categories (whether true or not, based on answers given by people who inherently didnt want to be there in the first place) then the government can withhold about 2 to 3 percent of the Medicare funds they should have received. For bigger hospitals that can be in the millions.

It sucks. But it is what it is. The hospital I work for has nurses taking care of 6 patients each in the ED. Providers (APRN, MD, or PA) can be seeing up to ten each. It's insane.

Currently I work as an ED tech and on an ambulance, and I'm currently starting school for my ASN to be an RN.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 09:23 PM
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They arent paying enough

This is probably corporate propraganda.. these for profit hospitals wont hire new people and expect their employees to work themselves to death

I put money on it



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 09:27 PM
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originally posted by: dubiousatworst
a reply to: rickymouse
Though what you are saying is definitely true about the statistics, it also makes his point some what stronger. All of the extra medical expenses will add maybe a month or two, meaning that we could make the assumption that the expenses to gain those extra months are astronomical.

Surely it is a gruesome question to ask, but how much would a person be willing to pay to live an extra day (or month or year)?

Is an extra month in the hospital clinging to life worth $2k a day?

These are the questions that nobody really wants to answer, especially when they are making these choices for a loved one.


They torture you in the hospital, they keep taking your blood, you are bedridden and sore as hell after they start working on you. You are right, most often you gain six months if you are old if any extra time at all for all that cost and hastle. My stepfather was told he would die in six months, he had lung problems from having a whole lung plus a half of the other removed in the army. The one grew back to about three quarters it's size. He had emphasema, they told him he has to stop smoking and get prepared to die. He did not give up smoking, he changed doctors and got oxygen tanks from the VA. Twenty six years later he finally died, if he had stayed with that doctor and all the medicines they were trying to push on him, he would have lasted under a year.

I can live with my epilepsy, I have studied food chemistry and learned to keep it from getting bad. It has been since 2002 that I got it from an accident. I took meds for almost five years, they almost killed me. I would have been dead within a year according to the neurologist if I kept on them. I may not be able to work a job anymore and I may not be like eating the diet I have to eat, but I can think and my health recovered pretty well after being off the meds for about three years. I was led to believe my symptoms that were killing me were from the epilepsy till the neurologist informed me I cannot take many types of meds on a regular basis because I cannot detox them properly.

I will research what I need to to find natural medicines I can tolerate. Many natural chemistries have the same properties as the meds I took that made me sick, I have to make sure not to overconsume those chemistries found in foods or the outcome will be bad.

Many of the people who are having side effects from meds believe that their condition is causing the uptick in deteriorating health, when in fact they cannot tolerate the chemistry of the meds.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 09:32 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

If I could show you how many people I've seen die because of noncompliance, you probably wouldnt push it on people because of anecdotal personal stories. It's truly one of the most aggravating things in the entire world. People in their late 20s dying from breast cancer after it mets'd and started a gangrenous infection in a limb, or people dying because of their diabetes, or anything else that is totally and completely preventable.

People who push noncompliance due to anecdote, or paranoia or just ignorance to medical science...shame on them. Shame on them.

Truly and utterly terrible.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: Iconic

I do not recommend this and have no data saying it would work and I am not a doctor but I wonder what a shot of prepped pharmacutical grade sodium bicarbonate would do if it was injected directly into that breast tumor?.....and if it did nothing would there be any significant side effects from trying?



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 09:53 PM
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originally posted by: dubiousatworst
a reply to: rickymouse
Though what you are saying is definitely true about the statistics, it also makes his point some what stronger. All of the extra medical expenses will add maybe a month or two, meaning that we could make the assumption that the expenses to gain those extra months are astronomical.

Surely it is a gruesome question to ask, but how much would a person be willing to pay to live an extra day (or month or year)?

Is an extra month in the hospital clinging to life worth $2k a day?

These are the questions that nobody really wants to answer, especially when they are making these choices for a loved one.


Yup. It is taboo topic. The amount of money we spend at end of life is astronomical. I don't know what the answer is but we have to have honest conversations and data analyses if we are to come up with solutions.

You best believe though if there is govt healthcare, the bureaucrats will be doing cost / benefit analyses to figure out if Grandpa really needs his knee replaced or if it is worth keeping Grandma alive another six months.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: Stupidsecrets

If the U.S. moves to government-run healthcare, the number and quality of medical providers will decrease.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 10:10 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

Plus the quality of care will decrease substantially. Not to mention giving the government more control over what's considered healthy and in your best interest. Bans on soda sizes got people irked already in some places...imagine what would happen nationwide with even more control, because of what's healthy, and what you need to do to be in line with government healthcare.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:07 PM
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originally posted by: Iconic
a reply to: rickymouse

If I could show you how many people I've seen die because of noncompliance, you probably wouldnt push it on people because of anecdotal personal stories. It's truly one of the most aggravating things in the entire world. People in their late 20s dying from breast cancer after it mets'd and started a gangrenous infection in a limb, or people dying because of their diabetes, or anything else that is totally and completely preventable.

People who push noncompliance due to anecdote, or paranoia or just ignorance to medical science...shame on them. Shame on them.

Truly and utterly terrible.


They just found out that people who cannot detox the chemo only need half the dose of the chemo and they survive. Now how come the medical industry did not figure this out before, evidently they thought one shoe fits all. They have identified genetic markers that can identify this now, so a simple genetic test could lessen side effects and keep people from dying from the chemo.

The other thing that is really helping people now is immunotherapy, something the professionals completely disagreed with in the past. What I study is the basis for the drugs used for immunotherapy. Backwards engineering it from the research they did to find the meds. At first they killed a lot of people with immunotherapy by giving them way too much of the medicine without moderating the patients immune system. They are finally getting it correctly. Some foods have ample amounts of this immunotherapy chemistry in them, common foods and herbs that only need to be boosted in consumption. But I study ways to make changes that will kill the cancer when it is just forming, what foods we consume and what part of the plant is best to use. I would rather inform people what spices they can add to the food they make or which foods in rotation will help them from ever having to deal with cancer growing into a problem. I do not tell people not to get tumors cut out or go for radiation treatment, I do not tell them to not take chemo. If I had cancer, I would go for the operation and maybe some radiation but I know enough about this chemistry to clean up what is left with common food chemistries. I would be willing to experiment on myself and know that if it works for me it may not work for others with different metabolism.

Some meds that are prescribed interfere with proper neurotransmission which leads to the immune system and it's leader, the brain, not detecting cancer. There are some scientific articles out there stating this. But the warnings are not being paid attention to by medical professionals....because they do not have time to research and find them.

This article addresses some drugs that effect thinking, but these also effect our immune system identifying cancer.
www.health.harvard.edu...

and here....medicalxpress.com...

It is late, if you want more evidence do a search on the subject. If harvard medical is not good enough for you, I doubt if you will accept NIH or NHS or oxford accademic or other medical journal research sites.

Remember that I mentioned that sections of the brain work closely with the immune system, confuse the brain and cancer can get started before being detected much easier.

WE have about seven safety mechanisms built into our cells to keep cancer from taking hold, all of those safeties must be disabled before we can get cancer. Some people have maybe one or two mutations that take out one or two of those safety mechanisms, only having five or six safeties left. Now it takes quite a bit to override those, but foods we eat, even organic foods will temporarily disable a couple sometimes, leaving even three or four to protect us. It is actually hard to have all of these protections fail, cancer should be rare. Enzymes need to be destroyed for more than a few days, our B-cells and T-cells have to have their senses blocked, Aptopsis has to be dampened. Cancer should be rare, thirty eight percent of the population should not be having cancer treatment at least once in their life. We would not need so many medical workers if people were not sick.
edit on 15-1-2020 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: Stupidsecrets

If the U.S. moves to government-run healthcare, the number and quality of medical providers will decrease.


Are you serious. I'm being serious because Veterans make up about 1% of the population and they are struggling to take care of them. They can't do it. It has gotten so bad they have thrown in the towel and gone to Choice which is basically telling Veterans to find a local doctor. Good on paper but what happens when there is a local waiting list.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:23 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Begging you to write in paragraph format. I can't read it. And cut it down. Great for a book but doesn't work in this format.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:28 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Stupidsecrets

It's hard to get more doctors and nurses when no one can afford to go to college.


It is not that, not enough teachers. Nurses and Doctors are overworked. No time to become teachers and a lot of them already died by the bioweapons that US created first place such as Malaria, SARS, Ebola, etc.

Big Pharma is also a freaking problem removing natural cures or shutting down anyone who finds proper cures naturally. Some people are just in gangs like Mafia to even care about passing on knowledge while getting shot and killed just like the Mafia because Money!!
edit on 15-1-2020 by makemap because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:34 PM
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originally posted by: Stupidsecrets
a reply to: rickymouse

Begging you to write in paragraph format. I can't read it. And cut it down. Great for a book but doesn't work in this format.



I usually try to, but it's hard to do sometimes, breaking up a paragraph that should be together.

I think I will start leaving out some of the content on my posts and try to generalize things into laymans terms more so people can read less, most people do not need to know how things work in the body. I will try to cut the length of my posts in half at least so I do not screw up their eyes.

I'll try to make it easier in future posts, it is hard to fix that one but I can do better in the future. Thanks for the constructive criticism.
edit on 15-1-2020 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:45 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Indeed it has been in the works for a very long time.

When I graduated nursing school, a little over forty years ago, I was lucky enough to be chosen for a special program that trained me to be a shock trauma nurse. Normally I would have had to work as a floor nurse for five years before being able to apply to work in shock trauma, so I was very lucky. My starting salary was $75 dollars an hour.

Over the years I have watched the beginning salary of nurses drop every year. It has gone from $75 dollars an hour to $18 dollars an hour, or less, depending on the area you live. The patient load has tripled, the hours have gotten longer, the respect has disappeared, and they wonder why there is a shortage?

There is no way in hell that I would become a nurse in this day and age. Less headache, less expense, and greater pay, to flip hamburgers at a local restaurant.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:52 PM
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originally posted by: Iconic
a reply to: rickymouse

If I could show you how many people I've seen die because of noncompliance, you probably wouldnt push it on people because of anecdotal personal stories. It's truly one of the most aggravating things in the entire world. People in their late 20s dying from breast cancer after it mets'd and started a gangrenous infection in a limb, or people dying because of their diabetes, or anything else that is totally and completely preventable.

People who push noncompliance due to anecdote, or paranoia or just ignorance to medical science...shame on them. Shame on them.

Truly and utterly terrible.


What I try to do is inform people to spend a little time researching possible things that can cause problems and avoid eating high amounts of highly processed foods. I try to provide information on how to avoid cancer from forming or to identify chemistries that can accelerate dementias. I never say not to go to a doctor, doctors are necessary, I try to tell people to try to moderate foods that can promote diabetes becoming an issue. I mention alternative chemistries that can be used to control some illnesses, and usually mention to them to talk to their doctor about how they can naturally do something about it. I don't know these people, never met them, I cannot diagnose something over the net, only give them options to talk to their doctor about.

I have studied the method of actions of pharmaceuticals and hacked many of them converting them to dietary alterations that can help to treat many conditions...but not all conditions. If an enzyme cannot be increased by diet, then a medicine or replacement enzyme needs to be taken. My intent is to try to teach people how to fix things before they become a problem or reverse a condition that is starting, often the damage cannot be fixed if it has gone too far, then they need meds.



posted on Jan, 16 2020 @ 06:39 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Stupidsecrets

It's hard to get more doctors and nurses when no one can afford to go to college.


That is NOT the issue. Affording medical school is not the reason we have a shortage.

I used to be an advisor at a prestigious Univ for premed students, along with teaching duties. I KNOW what it takes to get to Med school because of the LACK OF SPACES. It is very very hard. They want a 3.7- 3.9 GPA ideally (not 4.0, they feel those students are too perfect to make good docs, arrogant). They want NO visible tattoos (feel it gives patients less confidence). They want people who have volunteered a lot in the medical field. They are VERY picky, and they can be because the vast majority won't get in due to lack of spaces in medical schools. I saw many many a student who would have made great Docs get rejected because there was no room for them.

The problem is lack of medical schools. There are only a handful of medical schools in each state. They can only admit a limited number of students.

I had lots of well qualified students who could not get in to medical school because there wasn't room for them. If the US either enlarges the current medical schools, or opens more schools there would be enough MD's. I never had a student say they couldn't go because of money, Med school is the easiest school to get loans for there is. We actually have many US students going to "offshore" for profit medical schools in countries like Dominica, who come back and practice, and THOSE schools have to limit well qualified students because there are so many of them. We have the people who want to do it, we lack the schools or spaces in medical schools.

It would be great if Medical schools were subsidized more by the states, making them more affordable, but even the poorest students I advised, and yes I had some very poor ones, never did not go because of money.



edit on 1/16/20 by The2Billies because: addition



posted on Jan, 16 2020 @ 06:47 AM
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a reply to: The2Billies

Thanks for clearing that up! That definitely sounds like a bigger issue.



posted on Jan, 16 2020 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: The2Billies

Exactly. AMA limits medical school slots and it creates an artificial shortage which in turn keeps physician salaries high.

A lot of general medicine (sniffles, etc) can be done by nurses / physician assistants.

The medical system is a Gordian Knot now because of a 75 years of government interference. It will take a lot to unwind it.



posted on Jan, 16 2020 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: Puppylove
a reply to: Stupidsecrets

Yeah, not just doctors and nurses, but Home Health Aides as well.


This is a market driven problem. Its a crappy job with no advancement opportunity. I worked as a CNA in my early 20's just long enough to realize i'd rather do piece meal day jobs rather than care for the elderly at starvation wages while constantly being accused of not caring enough to do whatever pet peeve the boss du jour threw around that day.

Not saying that people won't do the job, or knocking the people who do (or the job itself). But if we want to improve that problem we need to fix wage scales for it, and find ways to advance people through it. For example, when entering vocational nursing you get no credit for a decade of experience working as a CNA. I.e., no advancement opportunity.



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