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VA Democrats Drop AR-15 Confiscation After 1000s of NRA Members Storm the Senate

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posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 10:55 AM
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originally posted by: Ahabstar
a reply to: rickymouse

Fair Market Value on a highly restricted gun is going to be WAY more than the original price. A pre-1986 transferable full autos usually start around $26,000. So an AR-15 in Virginia would probably start around $1500, maybe $2500 for extra bling like a forward grip and red dot sights.

Oh and good luck on regulating AR-15s brought in across state lines purchased in neighboring states legally. Which is exactly what would happen. Oh and there is a simple piece of plastic that can be added that can be printed on any 3D printer in about 20-30 minutes that converts any AR-15 to full auto. Expect to see those by the bucketload free with purchase of a magazine or ammo. I have even seen them as a keychain.


I am not impressed with fully automatic weapons, I am more of a person who targets what he shoots instead of peppering the whole area with bullets. I shot a fully automatic rifle years back and the only bullet that even got close to hitting what I aimed at was the first bullet. I do not see any need for them unless you wanted to pepper a crowd with bullets.




posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:10 AM
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originally posted by: Mach2
I have no problem with background checks


I do have a problem with background checks. My last background check listed the type and serial number of the weapon that I was purchasing. They were essentially compiling a gun registry. Then we have the accuracy of the information being used in the check. Anybody remember the guy who killed the bikers last year? I don't trust the competency of the public sector union employees that put the information into the database.

Shall not be infringed.

I figure that with in an hour some moron will post that I'm in favor of criminals getting guns. I really don't care, they get them anyway, all the background check does is hassle law abiding citizens.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:12 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: Ahabstar
a reply to: rickymouse

Fair Market Value on a highly restricted gun is going to be WAY more than the original price. A pre-1986 transferable full autos usually start around $26,000. So an AR-15 in Virginia would probably start around $1500, maybe $2500 for extra bling like a forward grip and red dot sights.

Oh and good luck on regulating AR-15s brought in across state lines purchased in neighboring states legally. Which is exactly what would happen. Oh and there is a simple piece of plastic that can be added that can be printed on any 3D printer in about 20-30 minutes that converts any AR-15 to full auto. Expect to see those by the bucketload free with purchase of a magazine or ammo. I have even seen them as a keychain.





I am not impressed with fully automatic weapons, I am more of a person who targets what he shoots instead of peppering the whole area with bullets. I shot a fully automatic rifle years back and the only bullet that even got close to hitting what I aimed at was the first bullet. I do not see any need for them unless you wanted to pepper a crowd with bullets.


Accuracy goes way down, but man they are FUN to shoot.
Short, controlled bursts.
Good for suppressing/covering fire.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:20 AM
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Northam plans to declare to state of emergency to ban firearms at planned protest.

Northam wants to ban all firearms from Capitol Square during a planned firearms rights protest, so he plans to declare a state of emergency to expand his powers to do that later today.


The Virginia Citizens Defense League is sponsoring the event, and they seem committed to following the letter of the law. Their instructions to protestors include the following:

CARRY: As of this moment, carry is prohibited inside the General Assembly (GA) Building and the Capitol. For this reason we suggest that if you intend to go inside to lobby you should leave your firearm at home, in your hotel room, or out-of-sight in your locked vehicle. DO NOT LEAVE AN UNSECURED GUN IN AN UNLOCKED CAR! There have been multiple firearms stolen out of vehicles lately. DO NOT HANDLE A LOADED FIREARM. VCDL's firearm safety policy at all VCDL-sponsored meetings, events, or gatherings has always been that loaded firearms shall NOT be handled; they will remain holstered or otherwise secured at all times. Don't ask someone to hold your gun while you go in the building. We suggest that if you are lobbying and come unarmed that you travel in groups with a DD...Designated Defender. This person volunteers to stay outside while the others go in and make our voices heard. As an alternative, you can use a fanny pack type holster which can be taken off and handed to your companion for safe keeping while you go into the building. AGAIN, DO NOT TAKE THE FIREARM OUT OF ITS HOLSTER.


These are the guidelines for the groups sponsoring the protest. They seem like they want to start the OK Corral.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko
They'll probably manufacture an incident and then say "See we were right!"



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Start? Seems like the VCDL are trying to prevent the OK Corral but encouraging their members to not carry or use Designated Defenders that remain outside the no go zone.

But if Northam wants to call up the Virginia National Guard and make them active, Trump can sign an Executive Order that makes them his to command. That order will be to stand down and maintain standard ROE of do not fire unless fired upon.

I have seen tons of Internet Cowboys pumping their chests about this and that. I have also seen plenty of calm, rational, reasoned voices saying basically “don’t start none if you don’t want none.” It is those quiet statements that have my attention as to just how bad it could get quickly. Because if they engage, you know the cowboys are not going to want to be proved cowards under fire.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:45 AM
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a reply to: Ahabstar

I was being tongue in cheek.

But Northam is doing himself no favors here. The rhetoric is inflammatory, and I'm not sure what he expected. People do take this right seriously.
edit on 15-1-2020 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Not a fan of lack of control. Burning 30 in a long burst is no control. Measured pulls and releases during instinctive aiming is suppressive fire for movement (advancing or retreating for cover) or aimed shots by others.

But what I was specifically saying is there are options out there that are not bumpstocks and are easy conversion without permanent alteration. Illegal? Absolutely illegal. But in a time of Without Rule Of Law (WROL) not a big plot point. And that acronym is becoming as common as boogaloo here lately.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

It is bordering on incitement if not outright sedition. And yes, some of my better writing is being used...extracurricularly from ATS.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: Ahabstar

People who forget their own history are doomed to repeat it.

The piece I linked to notes that the shooting Revolution started over a botched confiscation attempt by the Brits at Lexington and Concord. I think the Colonials were rebelling a bit before that in other ways.

Are they really that desperate or that stupid? They can push too far.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Yes, that was the shot heard round the world at the bridge between Lexington and Concord in which arms were hidden and sought to be impounded by British troops. There was also the very real fear that the Brits were going to capture John Hancock and Sam Adams because they were at one of the barns storing the arms, powder and lead. The bridge was where the British were intercepted and engaged to draw them into pursuit of the colonists.

But there were earlier adventures as well like the Boston Massacre. Boston Tea Party.
edit on 15-1-2020 by Ahabstar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Interesting bit of history that is, by this account, forgotten.

History does have a really bad habit of repeating itself...



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 01:40 PM
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originally posted by: Ahabstar
a reply to: ketsuko

Yes, that was the shot heard round the world at the bridge between Lexington and Concord in which arms were hidden and sought to be impounded by British troops. There was also the very real fear that the Brits were going to capture John Hancock and Sam Adams because they were at one of the barns storing the arms, powder and lead. The bridge was where the British were intercepted and engaged to draw them into pursuit of the colonists.

But there were earlier adventures as well like the Boston Massacre. Boston Tea Party.
Sounds like somebody read the Rush Revere series!

jk



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

I recall what I was taught in school actually. They don't call the events prior to Lexington and Concord part of the Revolution, but I think they were. They were just part of it before it went hot.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 02:03 PM
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Have these people ever been to Virginia?

Half the damn state is covered in 1776 type street names, business names, town names with American flags and revolutionary war symbolism everywhere

Tf is going on here



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 02:09 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
Have these people ever been to Virginia?

Half the damn state is covered in 1776 type street names, business names, town names with American flags and revolutionary war symbolism everywhere

Tf is going on here


There are states that have proposed dropping parts of US history prior to the Civil Wary as being irrelevant to living Americans. I think one of the Carolinas debated it.



posted on Jan, 15 2020 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

That or was a US History major with education as a minor once upon a time.



posted on Jan, 16 2020 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

a reply to: Ahabstar

I just am curious.

Since several people have mentioned that they didn't learn much history in school, do you guys know what the so called 'shootout at the OK Corral' was about?



posted on Jan, 16 2020 @ 02:55 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: Mach2

originally posted by: rickymouse
If a state were to ban AR15s and planned on confiscating them, they should be forced to pay fair market value for the guns. That means if the gun is like new, they pay what was paid for the gun. If they were worn out, maybe a hundred bucks to three hundred bucks based on what the blue book is. Remember, the guns were bought when they were legal, if they change the law the state has to pay for them, not confiscate them. We never gave the government the right to rob the citizens, yes, they can tax us because we gave them that ability....although, I doubt if anyone actually voted to have our government tax us.



Sc**w that.

No gun confinscation, or onerous laws period. I have no problem with background checks, and a fee comesurate with the cost of that administration, but beyond that, a repeal of the second amendment would be required. It is called "The Bill of Rights" for a reason. It expressly insures American's right to bear arms. "Right" being the operative word.

Anyone who disagrees is free to try and change the Contitution. There is a built in mechanism to do that very thing. Any other way is inherently illegal, and should be summarily struck down by the SCOTUS, without debate.


Here is the thing, the Feds cannot ban guns, but communities can say you cannot have them out unless you are going hunting or to a range, and there are rules that apply. The states have similar powers. But the states cannot actually confiscate your guns unless they somehow make you a criminal or you are using drugs that are considered illegal. They made cannabis legal here now but it is not legal at the federal level. Think about that. I do not use drugs anymore and have never been charged with using them in the past, but it would be easy for someone to plant it in my porch or in my car. They can make up something against anyone, plant something that is similar to a stolen item, there are lots of ways they can say someone lost their rights.


I recently (until June of 2108) lived in VA for a period of about 5 years. For a number of reasons, I decided to buy a handgun. Here's how hard it was:

I walked into a local pawn shop and saw a really nice Smith & Wesson 9mm for sale at a great price - $350.

I decided to buy it.

The clerk took my ID and asked me to wait a few minutes so I browsed around the store for a short while. After about 10 minutes, he came back handed me back my ID and said - "You're all set. Cash or charge and would you like a holster with that". VA's background check is simply to ensure you've never been convicted of a felony.

I bought a comfortable nylon holster for it for $29. I paid, put the holster on my hip and the gun in the holster and walked a few stores down to a sporting goods store and bought 100 rounds of 9mm ammunition. I loaded the clip (and put one in the chamber) put the gun back in the holster and walked out. VA is an open carry state. Total time from first walking into the pawn shop to walking down the street with the loaded gun on my hip - 30 minutes. It was the first and only gun I've ever purchased. God bless the great state of VA. It took far longer to get NY/NJ to process the paperwork so that I could bring it with me when I came to visit.



posted on Jan, 16 2020 @ 07:31 AM
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a reply to: rnaa

On the absolute face of it, gun confiscation under city ordinances.

Long story is there had been interactions between the Earps and the Cowboys for years. And politics and political rivalries were involved as well, especially with Wyatt and the sheriff Behan that supported the Cowboys.

Kurt Russell’s Tombstone is probably the best movie on it factually, but barely scratches the surface of the whole story. But compared to My Darling Clementine and Gun Fight at the O.K. Corral, it is light years ahead.

But the biggest fact always left out, is that it happened in an empty lot next to the photographer’s place. Six doors up the street from the rear of the corral. But as always, why let facts get in the way of a good story.



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