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Ever Had to Surrender A Pet ?

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posted on Jan, 8 2020 @ 11:09 PM
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I have 2 pits.I have a red nose male, and a Blue nose razors edge female. The male gets out of hand sometimes if there is stress in the home, or someone trying to dog his master. He is my boy though, and I love him. He never turns on me. Keep your boy calm, No yelling or anxiety. Do some research online. There is probably something you can do to save him




posted on Jan, 8 2020 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: Havox
Had a friend once he had A mix of some type. I had a German Shepard at the time. He came over with his dog, and I had to tell him to leave due to the dogs aggressive nature. It was snapping at my dog every once in a while, after a couple times I had enough.

About 6 months later His dog ended up ripping half of his 8 year old granddaughters face off when she tried to kiss it. This happened about 30 years ago, I wasn’t there when it happened, but it still bothers me. Is it worth taking that kind of chance?

Is groot’s dog salvageable? Absolutely. It will take a lot of cash to have the right kind of help. Is groot financially capable to spend probably several thousand dollars for that help? If so, that’s great. Expensive, but it can be done. He can give the dog to a rescue if he can find one that will take him. Not very many that will take a pit.

I’m sorry if you think I’m heartless, I’m not. I love dogs, and have had a dog since 1968 with no problems. Pits were developed to fight other dogs, not to be companions. The potential for them to have some quirks is there. When they do bite, they don’t want to let go. Time and time again in the news, they are responsible for quite a few attacks.

The problem is not the dog, it’s the owner that’s the problem. In my opinion a person that is either not willing, or doesn’t have the knowledge or the time to properly train a dog that can potentially attack people causing great harm, should stay away from this type.If you’re dog is aggressive, you are doing something wrong and better catch it the first time it happens and correct it or you can pay a high price.

I’m not an expert, I worked with dog handlers in the service 50 years ago and had quite a few really good conversations about aggressive dogs. Pits are a great dog, like all the other breeds. But they take a special owner, and a lot of work.

Sorry if this offends anyone, but that’s the way it is. If the dog is “unpredictable” someone made it that way. Do whatever you have to do for the pup it’s you’re Responsibility, you caused it now you have to live with it. Learn from the experience. Next time if their is one, look into golden retrievers .



posted on Jan, 8 2020 @ 11:46 PM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

Now you sound like a person that is a responsible owner.



posted on Jan, 8 2020 @ 11:55 PM
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a reply to: Groot
Had an English Bulldog years ago. A big dog and he was unpredictable. More than one close call with him. He suffered seizures on occasion. Fortunately for me he got a cancer of the scrotum and we had to put him down.

Put the dog down.

edit on 9-1-2020 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 02:23 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I would have never got a pit bull. There are lots of breeds of dogs, many mutts, that have nice personalities and are not so darn protective. They are better choices. People are afraid of pit bulls, and dogs can sense people's fear and will go after them.

When a dog gets old, they sometimes get mentally messed up and they start to get real crabby, even though they are nice most of the time. We had to have my father-in-laws dog put down when he died because the dog was old, really sore, and would snap at people if they came near him. It was a nice dog, but it was not right anymore, that is the only animal I had to have put down because it was crabby. We did not trust it around kids or people, it even tried to bite me a few times and many times grabbed at my daughter when she got close.

The humane society may be able to find a home for your dog, it is still young and sometimes people out in the country like a dog like that on their farm. If it is starting to show strong crabbiness, the Human Society might advise you to put it down, the vets give them a shot.

Get a border collie the next time, they are very mellow dogs. Not many people fear that kind of dog so the dog doesn't go after them, like I said, dogs can sense fear.


Humane societies are inundated with pit bulls. I wouldn't count on their being able to find a home at all.

Good point about the aging. Not only mental changes, but physical ones too. Pain can make everyone snappish.



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 02:34 AM
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originally posted by: Groot
As I hate it as much as typing this, I feel we are running out of options. We love our pitbull so much, heck, his name is Groot. But he has just gotten out of hand , and to be honest, dangerous.
He is just over 3 years old and just crazy and destructive. Plus he injures myself and my wife. Scared what he would do in public because sometimes he is good and friendly, and sometimes trying to eat people.
Groot is basically uncontrollable and unpredictable.

We have alot of traveling this year to do to visit family and grand kids and scared of him hurting someone. We have tried to put him in a kennel one time, and it did not go well.

What would you do?


He needs a vet check and then a referral to an animal behaviorist. Not a "dog whisperer" idiot, but one associated with a vet school or someone who is officially trained in it. The specialist then needs to tell you whether that dog is safe or not. If the dog is deemed unsafe, then they can tell you whether a treatment plan would work or if the dog should be euthanized.

I had a Schutzhund GSD who went for my face one day. I can still feel the muzzle whiskers against my face, it was that close. Based on where I felt his muzzle, he would have taken off the lower part of my nose and entire mouth, along with skin from the chin and cheeks. I consulted with his regular vet and a vet behaviorist. The specialist told me that he would have to be kept in a muzzle 24/7. That's too cruel. And knowing how some humans treat animals who behave badly even occasionally, I didn't see rehoming as an option. I chose euthanasia. I'm immunosuppressed, so not only would a face bite result in disfigurement and plastic surgery, but it could also kill me. Me or the dog? Much as I loved that dog, goodbye dog. It was a hard lesson learned from an abusive ex-husband. Threatening to seriously harm or kill me isn't okay, man or beast.

I also worked briefly with a rescue that was trying to adopt out a rottweiler who was so ****** unsafe, it was unbelievable. I hope that dog didn't end up biting someone badly.

Anyway, we owe it to ourselves, families and society to have safe dogs. Dogs have killed people. If the dog can't be safe, then it shouldn't be reshuffled into another home. He or she should be euthanized. There are fates worse than death. We owe it to the dogs to get them help when they need it and a quality of life that makes life worth living.
edit on 9-1-2020 by drussell41 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 03:37 AM
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You could seek some professional help, for example a trainer. It may be as simple as that. Such an approach may also reveal whether you are part of the problem and need to modify your behaviours. I don't mean that in a bad way.

Otherwise, if you cannot live with your dog then you will have to see if it can be rehomed.

The long and the short is that if a dog shows signs of aggression – especially something like a pitbull – then this needs to be tackled. If the dog bit someone, or worse, then that’s really bad news. I would certainly ensure children are not in the mix until the problem is resolved.



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 05:54 AM
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a reply to: Groot

It may have been suggested already, but a pitbull rescue might be able to help with sorting out a plan for your pup.



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 08:16 AM
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edit on 9-1-2020 by Aryabhata because: off topic



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 09:44 AM
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originally posted by: Topcraft
a reply to: Havox

The problem is not the dog, it’s the owner that’s the problem.


The latter sometimes bolsters the former's innate instincts and reinforces that sometimes it really is the dog type, though. A stupid owner gets a dog NOT bred for companionship & tries to say "X breed is a fine family dog breed!", thus the problem is both the stupid owner, and the fighting/war dog being forced to be a benign lapdog temperament when it's real temperament is very aggressive/violent. No amount of training or good ownership is going to change that, that dog is what it is, it is what it was bred to be. Training cannot, and will never, change that.



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 09:57 AM
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Owner of several pitbulls here. They are active dogs and need to be exercised or they will destroy things. You need to make it a point to get home and walk/run/play with your dog. I know you're prob tired from a long day working but you have a responsibility to that animal.

You need to make an effort to show that your wife is second in command around the house. If he sees her as under her he won't listen on walks and will walk all over her. Do you let Groot sleep in your bed at night? If so, get him his own bed and send him to the floor. He needs structure and a hierarchy. I have worked with problem pits all my life and the problem was never the dog when the dog was shown the proper authority.

Dogs need to know their place in the pack. And it's up to the alpha to show them.



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: PraetorianAZ
Owner of several pitbulls here. They are active dogs and need to be exercised or they will destroy things. You need to make it a point to get home and walk/run/play with your dog. I know you're prob tired from a long day working but you have a responsibility to that animal.

You need to make an effort to show that your wife is second in command around the house. If he sees her as under her he won't listen on walks and will walk all over her. Do you let Groot sleep in your bed at night? If so, get him his own bed and send him to the floor. He needs structure and a hierarchy. I have worked with problem pits all my life and the problem was never the dog when the dog was shown the proper authority.

Dogs need to know their place in the pack. And it's up to the alpha to show them.


The wife is First in command with the dog. He minds me extremely well and is fairly laid back when it is just me and him. I only have to give him "the look" or shake a drink straw at him and he minds- until hubs gets home and he loses his mind! Problem is that due to health problems in the past 2 years (Groot is 3 1/2 years old) I can no longer take him for long walks or do energetic play time with him. Also during this time he has become EXTREMELY over protective of both of us- especially around younger men. He is good with other dogs (though he likes to play rough), he is fixed, he doesn't sleep with us and he is my 4th pitbull. He is awesome with women and kids but has snapped at one of our son inlaws, one of our daughter's boyfriends and went for my ex-husband's throat unprovoked. Once when hubs was alone with him he snapped at a woman who tried to pet him.

I feel horrible that I am not able to give him the physical activity and socialization that he needs anymore, and it is a permanent situation. It is not the dog's fault. I think he goes nuts when hubs gets home because he is too full of energy from being good for me all day and is snappy around some people because as a result of being cooped up so much with me his protective instincts are in overdrive. This was not the situation when we got him or during the first year and a half of his life but sometimes life throws you situations that are completely unexpected.

As much as I love him I believe he would be better off with a new home, but it is difficult to rehome an energetic pitbull, not to mention when we kenneled him during our last trip he had a complete doggie nervous breakdown and we had to cut our trip short because of it (he was so lethargic he became physically ill and refused to eat, drink, play or even walk- the kennel had to take him to the vet). I previously talked to his vet about a trainer who specializes in pitbulls but the trainer is in the next state and it would be hard for hubs to go to work in the next state, come home and pick up the dog to bring him back to the next state for training sessions and then return home after working all day and I am unable to bring him- we are not spring chickens anymore. I really don't want to drug him but I'm afraid he is going to end up hurting someone. It's just a tough situation.



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: Groot

I would start looking a person who has experience with this breed and give it to that person,

No way around this, somehow, somewhere, you messed up.

Maybe played the wrong kind of games with it?
Maybe supporting the wrong kind of behavior while not rewarding the good behavior?

Anyways we all make mistakes, and the dog is at an age that it can still be de-programmed to be a good boy.

Really hope it works out somehow.



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: Groot

I don’t mean to be presumptuous but does he have plenty of exercise - ie a walk twice a day

Does he have good routines around mealtimes

Does he have gentle but firm boundaries ?

Is he left alone a lot ?

Does he have good nutritious food ie not kibble

A dog trainer could help with that

But exercise , routine and boundaries ( gentle ) are very important or you will get an unruly dog

Does he socialise with other dogs ?

I would never give my dog up - I love him and he is family - but I would get him help if he needed it and it sounds like your dog needs help

If you do not have the time and the patience to support him you should find him a home with someone he does

Not at any of those terrible and cruel kill shelters

I hope you can help him or get the help you need to support him







posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 06:28 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT
a reply to: Groot
Had an English Bulldog years ago. A big dog and he was unpredictable. More than one close call with him. He suffered seizures on occasion. Fortunately for me he got a cancer of the scrotum and we had to put him down.

Put the dog down.



No !!!!! Don’t do this ....



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 08:14 PM
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a reply to: Groot

If he's bitten you or your wife, put a bullet in him. A lot of us have been there, sucks to have to do it, but it's the only way to handle a dog that bites its master.



posted on Jan, 9 2020 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: Groot

Pit bulls are banned for that very reason here in Ontario.



posted on Jan, 10 2020 @ 05:12 AM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
a reply to: Groot

Pit bulls are banned for that very reason here in Ontario.


So bad owners in Ontario can get Rottweilers or German shepherds instead, yes?

Or maybe a Caucasian.. Those can kill two humans in one bite.



posted on Jan, 10 2020 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: solve

Ya, pretty much.

There was this period for about a year, in that all we would hear about is how vicious and unpredictable the breed was.

The media covered every single dog attack or bite.
It was damn near weekly that we would hear about a new incident.

Sort of like a well planned slander piece by the media.
The next year there was a bill passed for the banning of pitbulls.

Those who currently owned one, were grandfathered in.
The dog had to be on a short leash, and muzzled.

I honestly can’t remember the last time I saw a Pit.
Guess the ban worked here.



posted on Jan, 10 2020 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

Do you know if they did another count on dog bites/attacks after the ban?

In some places other breeds just filled in after banning certain breeds.

But then again, difficult to trust in statistics these days.

i was once attacked by an off leash American Akita, was sure i was going to die, but it could not bite trough all the layers of clothing i had on because it was winter, but after wrestling kicking and punching it gave up, and left.
edit on 10-1-2020 by solve because: (no reason given)




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