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Can This New Discovery Prove One Day That Interdimensional Beings Exist?

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posted on Dec, 25 2019 @ 06:06 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99
Given the little we know in the grand picture, couldn't there be a 4th dimension (time) that we just don't know, and don't know how it works?
What 4th dimension did you think I was talking about here?


originally posted by: Arbitrageur
Yes, there are copious numbers experiments consistent with Einstein's 4 dimensional model, and if there were 5 or more dimensions, as the article I linked in my previous post says, one can demonstrate that experiments would not be consistent with a 4 dimensional model. So in that sense we do have copious amounts of evidence of 4 dimensions and lack of additional dimensions as explained in the link.
Einstein's 4 dimensional model is 3 dimensions of space and one of time. We sure don't know everything but what we do know is that so far every experiment we use to test Einstein's model matches observation, even the prediction that your head ages faster than your feet when you're standing up. That was proven in a relatively recent experiment which required newer clocks of unprecedented accuracy, so we do understand something about time.

Special & General Relativity Questions and Answers

space and time, as physical constructs, have to be combined into a new mathematical/physical entity called 'space-time', because the equations of relativity show that both the space and time coordinates of any event must get mixed together by the mathematics, in order to accurately describe what we see. Because space consists of 3 dimensions, and time is 1-dimensional, space-time must, therefore, be a 4-dimensional object.
Special relativity was published in 1905 and Minkowski developed space-time math in 1906, and in over a century since then we have made many tests of the relativity models and all experiments are consistent with the models of special relativity and general relativity.




posted on Dec, 25 2019 @ 06:27 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Yes but Einstein's 4th dimension (time) is relative to our perception of time. It can be manipulated, which has been proven. It can almost be slowed to zero based on the fundamentals of relativity.

I was simply speculating a possibility, we know that light has a speed limit, the fastest one in the known universe. We also know (for the most part) that the universe is and has been expanding beyond the speed of light.

Something is making that happen.

If there is a force causing expansion, there could be the opposite, and likely should be according to physics. Same would apply to time.

Just stuff I think about, thanks for the response



posted on Dec, 25 2019 @ 06:47 AM
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a reply to: Vector99
Relativity is a fairly solid theory, since it is so well matched by experiment.

The faster than light expansion is not a violation of relativity's speed limit saying that nothing can travel faster than light, after you understand the fact it's referring to a local speed limit. The galaxies receding at 3 times the speed of light are not local and thus don't violate the theory of relativity.

Theories for the accelerating expansion of the universe are not as experimentally verified as relativity. For one thing relativity is at least 104 years old and the accelerating expansion evidence is only 21 years old. Depending on who you talk to, some scientists think the accelerating expansion or "dark energy" is just a property of space referred to as "Lambda" or the cosmological constant, which is at the heart of the Lambda-CDM (Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model. That model is reasonably good, but there is some "tension" in it, unlike relativity. But other cases of cosmological model tension have disappeared with better observations, like the old tension that the oldest stars in the universe were older than the universe. Now that we have better observations and models of stellar age, that tension has disappeared and the oldest stars are no longer older than the universe, as long as you take the error bars into account. Hopefully the tension in the Lambda-CDM model will also diminish as observations improve.



posted on Dec, 25 2019 @ 06:50 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Yes, but one of the simple foundations of relativity that must exist

For every action there must be an equal and opposite reaction.

What is expansion reacting to?



posted on Dec, 25 2019 @ 07:07 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Yes, but one of the simple foundations of relativity that must exist

For every action there must be an equal and opposite reaction.
Sorry, that's not a foundation of relativity. That's Newton's third law and Newton's model worked very well for centuries but we now know that Einstein's relativity model and quantum mechanics are more accurate, and moreover that Newton's model doesn't always hold. If you apply Newton's model, GPS won't work, and the Large Hadron Collider won't work, so in that respect, Newton's laws are obsolete. Even the law you mention is known to be violated in some circumstances like many of the old, classical laws which have been superseded by modern theory. Newton's laws still work for common things on Earth (aside from GPS and the LHC etc type exceptions) but do not form the basis for cosmological theory.

What happens when Newton's third law is broken?

Even though it is one of the fundamental laws of physics, Newton's third law can be violated in certain nonequilibrium (out-of-balance) situations. When two objects or particles violate the third law, they are said to have nonreciprocal interactions. Violations can occur when the environment becomes involved in the interaction between the two particles in some way, such as when an environment moves with respect to the two particles.



What is expansion reacting to?
Your question is based on a model that's over a century out of date, learn the modern, more accurate models, like relativity and quantum mechanics, and also the Lambda-CDM model, which is a cosmological adaptation of general relativity. Here's a NASA primer on Lambda to get you started:


This model is a mathematical parameterization of Big Bang cosmology, as described by General Relativity and the Friedman-Lemaître-Roberson-Walker (FLRW) equations. ΛCDM assumes that the universe is composed of photons, neutrinos, ordinary matter (baryons, electrons) and cold (non-relativistic) dark matter, which only interacts gravitationally, plus "dark energy", which is responsible for the observed acceleration in the Hubble expansion. Dark energy is assumed to take the form of a constant vaccuum energy density, referred to as the cosmological constant (Λ). Standard (6 parameter) ΛCDM further imposes the constraint that space is flat (Euclidean).



edit on 20191225 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Dec, 25 2019 @ 07:13 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur




Sorry, that's not a foundation of relativity. That's Newton's third law

Yeah, i feel pretty stupid right now for such a simple mistake soooo



posted on Dec, 25 2019 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
Why do folks believe that a "dimension" is a physical location in which things can exist ?
They have to exist in all 12 dimensions , or they don't exist at all .
Yes , I said 12 .
New thoughts add the 12th to describe an infinite number of infinite multiverses .



Phage:


The word dimension has an actual meaning. Unfortunately it seems to have been appropriated. It's become all newagey. What's wrong with the term alternative universe? I mean, we live in three spatial dimensions. That is not "a dimension." Right?


Stars for you. I agree with you both. Bravo



posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 11:14 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

I have seen a debate amongst theist scientists where they argued if God would exist in yhe eighth or eleventh dimension if eleven exist



posted on Dec, 26 2019 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur




If you're really interested in this topic, I suggest reading the entire linked article as I've only quoted selected parts of it, but the entire article is helpful if you have some background in math and science to be able to understand what it's talking about.


Appreciate the link and reply.

I’m not going-back-to-graduate-school interested — or look for closed form solutions as a hobby — but I do understand the maths and enjoy learning, so inso as much as “that it is what is”, I largely agree with the thrust of your reply and the quoted material.

Friggin DMV is closed (but open tomorrow, Friday, wtf?) and the pine needles are still mostly wet, so I’m gonna dig in on your link(s)...

Happy New Year.




posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 12:31 PM
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You seem to be playing with a multiverse theory along with various dimensions being one and the same. Wouldn’t the idea that a local phenomena with this concept be local in origin? As in our future (our past) selves playing with this concept and interfacing with us here? Is that “aliens?”

Disclosure phase 12 officallll

a reply to: shawmanfromny



posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

We've known about extra dimensions in science for over 100 years not 15. Nothing is to say aliens exist there. Nothing to see here



posted on Dec, 27 2019 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Just replying to say your linked material was a good read and more should read it. Nothing new to me was presented but I do share your opinion that interested readers should take the time to read it and read it again...and a again. It’s worth a three-reader




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