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What would YOU have done???

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posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 01:07 PM
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Warning: Possible unpleasant article and commentary ahead! Proceed at your own risk.

This topic should be good for some discussion / debate.

Missouri couple's dog shot and killed by landowner while running around and getting into garbage.

The dog, a "wolfdog" (or cross between a gray/timber wolf and a canine) had left his owner's 10 acre property and was shot by another landowner while rummaging through his garbage. The shooter then sent the owner the dog's collar and an anonymous note in the mail indicating he had shot the dog and reminding the owner of local leash laws.

In reading the article it looks as though this may not have been the first time the dog, and it's hybrid-wolf sibling had gotten out and were roaming around.




Chad Stricker spent six days searching for his 10-month-old wolfdog, Nymeria, in the Ozona community in rural Pearl River County.

Nymeria had gone missing after her usual night roaming of Stricker’s 10-acre property with her older brother, Ghost.

Ghost, a white wolf-hybrid dog, came back early Saturday night without his sister.


Couple's dog shot

So, what would YOU do as a landowner in this circumstance??? Who was wrong here?

At first glance this act may seem cruel and unreasonable, and I suspect many here will agree. However, I suspect some may also gain some insight into the "other" point of view.

So, without further adieu, here's what I would have done. Would I have shot the dog? Maybe...possibly even probably. Would I have attempted to see if the dog was a pet or not? Yes, most likely, but this would have had little to do with my ultimate decision.

I likely first, given the chance, would have attempted to identify the dog and its owner. And then I would have contacted the owner if I could find them and warned them not to let their dogs roam free off their property (and I have done this on more than a couple occasions. I was also very clear about the likely result if they failed to keep their dogs on their property (i.e. they would be shot)).

The article says the dog was a "sweetheart", but everyone says that about their dog. This dog was also part Wolf too. Now, being a Wolf will instantly up your chances of getting shot around here! Sweetheart or not!

Now, if the dog showed up repeatedly (which the article doesn't mention), or if the dog acted like it was going to attack...it would have been DRT (Dead Right There).

I'm sure my view may seem cruel, but all you have to do is lose a couple calves or a cow to a pack of dogs, a wolf or some coyotes to have a completely different mindset. I'm a dog lover, but I make sure my dogs stay where they belong, and I fully realize if they don't they too are at risk of being shot. Roaming dogs is never a good thing. Plus, if the wolf-dog was in the garbage this would be an indicator the dog is possibly hungry...which is even more risk to the livestock.

One thing I wouldn't have done in this scenario was leave an anonymous note. That's just chickenS#! I would have delivered the dog, and his collar, back to the owner and explained what happened...like any responsible landowner should do. It's a serious matter, and it deserves serious attention.

I'm sorry for the man's loss, but I blame the death on the owner, not the dog.

What say you??


edit on 12/23/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 01:12 PM
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I'm not so far removed from farmers and stock owners that I blame the guy who shot the dog.

It's great to have your own land and the ability to let your animals roam on it, but they have to stay on your land same as in town. Stock loss is a serious thing and real, and dogs, however domesticated, are still predatory by nature. Just because they see you as a pack leader and behave doesn't mean they will treat your neighbors the same, and it for darn sure doesn't mean they'll resist your neighbors' stock.

The loss of one animal represents serious dollars.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko




The loss of one animal represents serious dollars.


Yes it does, several thousand dollars in fact. Just one animal.

ETA - Notice how the article is so heavily slanted in the direction of the dog owner??

"There's nothing I can do!" "They should change the laws!", etc.


edit on 12/23/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 01:33 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I understand both sides of this predicament but nowhere does it mention the neighbor firing a warning shot to scare the dog off- I would have at least tried that first no matter what sort of animal it was. I also think leaving an anonymous note is chicken spit.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 01:41 PM
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Out in the country it's shoot and shovel for problems like that.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I couldn't shoot any dog no way in hell.

And if somebody shot my dog he better be expecting hell to visit him.
edit on 23-12-2019 by carsforkids because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I had five Huskies. Unfortunately, a lot of people think that Huskies are part wolf. All five of mine were pure breed, AKC registered and NAPR registered. 100% Siberian Husky.

I only have five acres but there are 110 acres of woodland behind me. I have neighbors that have animals, mostly chicken, cows, horses, goats, pigs, and donkeys. Try as I may to keep my dogs on property, my dogs manage to get free. It is a rare occasion, but it happens.

I have never had a complaint from my neighbors, ever, that my dogs have ever attempted to bother any of their animals. They are Huskies. They have a strong prey drive, but they want to run more than hunt, and when mine get free, they are off to the races. The 100 acre woods is their favorite spot. The problem is that we have a constant problem with illegal hunting in those woods, and because of massive new construction in the area, we are being inundated with coyote.

Local folk don't understand that their shoot on sight approach to coyote control is not an effective solution, so I am sure I lost one of my Huskies in this manner. Sandy was the only red Husky I had. I have one black and white Husky and three silver/grey Huskies. Sandy looked so much like a fox or a coyote that I truly believe she was mistaken for one, because she was the only one that never made it home.

I has been three months since she has been gone. I have accepted that I will probably never see her again. I went to the big guns and posted to the town Facebook page pictures and notification information, alerting everyone that my Huskies are not wolves, nor wild animals, and even offered a reward for their return if spotted off property. I will pay for any damages and relocate my animal if it becomes too much of a nuisance, and if compensation is not enough. But I would not want someone to shoot my dog because they were pilfering garbage.


edit on 23-12-2019 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: Corrected post.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk



Secondly, you never gave me a chance to correct the problem, you never came to me and told me my dog was tearing up your trash.


This is one of the things wrong with society today. People don't talk things out any more. Obviously this dog was not after the shooter's "stock", as some have mentioned, because she was digging through the trash. It wasn't an emergency and the shooter could have called the owner.

So, to answer the question - I would have called the owner and let him handle it.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: carsforkids
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I couldn't shoot any dog no way in hell.

And if somebody shot my dog he better be expecting hell to visit him.


If your dog comes onto my property, then he is fair game. Be responsible, and it won't happen. Your threat of hell is an empty one. If 911 isn't fast enough, I will defend myself against any "hell" you care to send my way. So bring it on, tough guy.
edit on 12/23/2019 by schuyler because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 02:18 PM
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I shoot coyotes and wolves. The birds take care of the rest. You think coyote's are sneaky.... a wolf also has malice in it's blood.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 02:18 PM
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Easy. Shooter is killed at earliest convenience. Should not be leaving trash for animals to pick up. Simple. Shooter is also fed to dogs. Thank you. Circle of life. Dogs continue to do their job because who can have just one? I'm an omnivore- don't need meat. Dogs do.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

You brag about shooting a defenseless dog as if the dog knows he
shouldn't be on your property But I'm the tuff guy? What I said was
no brag just fact. Any body that would shoot a defenseless dog
deserves hell. I wouldn't stop at just kill'n him I'd kill his whole family
burn his down and kill all his friends too. What kind of idiot shoots his
neighbors dog? You commit an act of war on me expect war. Not
being tuff just being a man. Shoot my dog see what happens to ya!



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: Iamonlyhuman
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk



Secondly, you never gave me a chance to correct the problem, you never came to me and told me my dog was tearing up your trash.


This is one of the things wrong with society today. People don't talk things out any more. Obviously this dog was not after the shooter's "stock", as some have mentioned, because she was digging through the trash. It wasn't an emergency and the shooter could have called the owner.

So, to answer the question - I would have called the owner and let him handle it.



Me too.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: carsforkids
Had a dog most of my childhood.
Totally understand your anger.

Turning point:
It is the dogs owners responsibility to keep the dogs on his premise. The owner is responsible for their animals.

I have seen photos of deer that ended up cruel because a dog went off its natural drive and the owner was not able to call it back. What if children are involved? No one can guarantee exact how a animal will react.

The shooter should have gave a warning shot. It was not the first time the dog(s) were roaming so how do we know, or not know if warning shots have been fired before? The shooter should have left the anonymous bs aside and stepped on the owners door steps like a man.

I love dogs but they are animals and you can not demand any insight on the dogs mood from any stranger. If the owner fails, however circumstances led to it, he is to blame, the animals suffers.

And if you go out and say things like you would kill his whole family, that makes you the crazy and dangerous one.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 03:21 PM
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It is 100% the wolf-dog owners fault. The owner was irresponsible so the land owner managed the problem that the wolf-dog owner wouldn't manage for themselves. I am with you.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 03:23 PM
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My family has had Huskies for decades, they are incredible animals and dang good escape artist. I have had to leave work and retrieve mine on several occasions. The best way to keep them in is a good electric fence and a lot of love. As you can probably tell we love our dogs and have become part of the pack. I once had a half husky, half wolf that slept beside my bed for years. If I was away on business, my wife said he would cry like a baby. He missed me, and I was his human.

Would I have shot the dog in question? It was a 10 month old pup with a collar on, give me a break. I would have call the dog and if possible got the number from the collar and called the owner. Same as a human, I would only shoot a dog in self-defence. Not for fun and never to be cruel and to punish the dogs owner by writing the chicken §h!¥ note.

Some people are just sick and sometimes the dogs are the more civilised, if you grow to understand them.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

The key difference between you and the dog owner in the OP is that you are taking responsibility proactively and financially.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 03:25 PM
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Someone's loose dog killed one of our cats in our yard once.

To answer the question, it would depend on 4 things:
1: Where I live. If I'm living out in the country and the dog now thinks my property is its territory, that's not working in the dog's favor. If I'm in a town or suburban area in close proximity to other people, then I'd probably just ignore it and let it be someone else's problem.
2. What kind of dog it is. Obviously I'm not going to shoot a chihuahua, but if it's big enough to injure or kill me, I'm not about to have to worry about getting attacked every time I walk outside my own home.
3. How it's acting. If it's wagging its tail and smiling, I'd probably just call a local cop to find out who it belongs to. If I don't know what it's thinking, I'd be more likely to want to shoot it.
4. Do I have small children or other small pets that go outside, like cats or small dogs? I'd care about those far more than a neighbor's dog.

So, most likely the dog gets a bullet. Dogs can be dangerous and I have the right not to face danger on my own property. I lived in a rural area for the majority of my life and occasionally shooting animals is just part of life - an example being the time my dad shot a raccoon that was dragging a broken leg behind itself.
edit on 12/23/2019 by trollz because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

If it is my fault that I was not able to keep my dog on property, then attack me. Fine me. If it makes you happy, shoot me. If it is my fault, then take it out on the stupid careless human, not on the innocent dog that just gave into a temptation created by us stupid humans.

If my dog attacked someone or one of their animals, I would not blame my neighbor for protecting themselves or their livestock, but to shoot my dog because they got into your trash, is just cruel and so unnecessary, which the shooter proved was just a mean, underhanded, move against his neighbor.

I consider myself a responsible dog owner, but Huskies are great escape artist and it is a constant battle for me to stay two steps ahead of them. Sometimes I lose, and sometimes it happened because of someone else's mistake. Either way, I am lucky because all of my neighbors know my dogs, and know the worse thing they will do is lick them to death. My fear is not my neighbors, it is my woods. So my personal problem is a little different.

I still stand firm though that shooting a neighbor's dog for getting into your trash is just plain wrong, cruel, and unnecessary.



posted on Dec, 23 2019 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Its called a pump BB gun with a scope. They get shot in the arse enough times they will learn not to come around anymore. Dogs aren't dumb and they hate a shot of pain. Its like if you want your dog to quit chasing cars. Tie a rag (or stick it in the hub cap) and drive by real slow. Once the dog gets his teeth stuck in the rag and rolled over a few times he's gonna lean towards not chasing cars.

Dogs that run in packs are a whole other story.

It is called a teachable moment.




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