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Very Large Telescope images stunning central region of the Milky Way

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posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 01:19 PM
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Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory based in in northern Chile have released high resolution images and the video below of the central region of our Galaxy , the observations give a new take for astronomers on the rate of Star formation in the early Galaxy and challenge the accepted theory that Star formation has been continuous throughout the history of the Milky way.



"Contrary to what had been accepted up to now, we found that the formation of stars has not been continuous," adds Francisco Nogueras-Lara, who led two new studies of the Milky Way central region while at the same institute in Granada.

In the study, published today in Nature Astronomy, the team found that about 80% of the stars in the Milky Way central region formed in the earliest years of our galaxy, between eight and 13.5 billion years ago. This initial period of star formation was followed by about six billion years during which very few stars were born. This was brought to an end by an intense burst of star formation around one billion years ago when, over a period of less than 100 million years, stars with a combined mass possibly as high as a few tens of million Suns formed in this central region.

"The conditions in the studied region during this burst of activity must have resembled those in 'starburst' galaxies, which form stars at rates of more than 100 solar masses per year," says Nogueras-Lara, who is now based at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. At present, the whole Milky Way is forming stars at a rate of about one or two solar masses per year.

"This burst of activity, which must have resulted in the explosion of more than a hundred thousand supernovae, was probably one of the most energetic events in the whole history of the Milky Way," he adds. During a starburst, many massive stars are created; since they have shorter lifespans than lower-mass stars, they reach the end of their lives much faster, dying in violent supernova explosions.
phys.org...


Just one Galaxy in a Universe of Billions.




posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 01:34 PM
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I've been thinking about moving to the Central Region.
The cost of living is getting too high here in the outer Orion Arm.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 01:38 PM
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Trying to comprehend the enormity of our Universe makes my head hurt. Amazing pics, thx for the post Gortex.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: gortex

What would I need to somewhat sort of see something close to this with a common telescope bought on a middle class income budget?



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 02:33 PM
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Damn, there is simply absolutely no way every one of those suns does not have a planet inhabited by life. Just unfathomable to consider that...

What an amazing place the enormity of the universe is...



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: mtnshredder

It is amazing when you consider everything we cannot see as well. What if there are different dimensions that we cannot detect,. The size of this footage would be tiny. Makes you really think what is the meaning of it all and why something like politics, money, etc have become so important to many when in reality it doesn't mean squat.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 03:06 PM
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Astounding...

Can never pass up a chance to repost this one as well.

Just one galaxy among millions...



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: LSU2018

The images were taken using radio telescopes so sadly no consumer telescope will get you views like this but ESA and NASA images are available without the expense.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 04:59 PM
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originally posted by: gallop
Damn, there is simply absolutely no way every one of those suns does not have a planet inhabited by life. Just unfathomable to consider that...

What an amazing place the enormity of the universe is...


If only one in a hundred has life, simply put, “we aren’t very special anymore.”



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: LSU2018


Celestron NexStar 6SE 150mm f/10 Schmidt-Cassegrain GoTo Telescope

www.celestron.com...


I had one, they go for around $700. You won't see images like in the video, but what you will see will astound you for hours on end.




edit on 17-12-2019 by RickinVa because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 05:24 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Stunning! Also, another example of scientists forming their overall views based on very limited knowledge. I bet there are stars being formed in newer galaxies. And there are probably new galaxies being created too.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 05:29 PM
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When you're going through the mostly mundane motions of life on this little planet and all the things you worry about and fret over, thinking this is it, Then you see things like this and are reminded of the enormity, beauty and unknown wonders out there. Makes everything seem a little bit magical for a moment.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 05:38 PM
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Were the only life in the Universe on this little Flat planet Earth..



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 06:21 PM
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I can see my house from here!



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 06:26 PM
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originally posted by: Plotus
Were the only life in the Universe on this little Flat planet Earth..

Pretty much. A strange sequence of highly improbable random events that led to the unlikely convergence / creation of a complex molecule within a porous membrane that for some reason wants to make copies of itself forever and will go to extreme lengths to do it.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 06:27 PM
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originally posted by: valiant
When you're going through the mostly mundane motions of life on this little planet and all the things you worry about and fret over, thinking this is it, Then you see things like this and are reminded of the enormity, beauty and unknown wonders out there. Makes everything seem a little bit magical for a moment.

Yup, nothin' matters. Might as well start killin'.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 07:42 PM
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originally posted by: Charliebrowndog
a reply to: mtnshredder

It is amazing when you consider everything we cannot see as well. What if there are different dimensions that we cannot detect,. The size of this footage would be tiny. Makes you really think what is the meaning of it all and why something like politics, money, etc have become so important to many when in reality it doesn't mean squat.

Nothing like looking at one pic and realizing how insignificant we really are. To think of us as being alone in the Universe is quite an arrogant thought when you see photos like this.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 08:44 PM
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hmm, I'm literally watching this video as I am viewing this thread.



Interesting is the "time-domain" astronomy.



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 08:46 PM
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a reply to: LSU2018
Get a "reflector" design, not a "refractor".



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: gallop When you consider the ENORMOUS complexities of DNA transcription and replication, it becomes mathematically impossible.



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