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Moving in tandem-- Donald and Boris and some election parallels

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posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 01:40 AM
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a reply to: xpert11
I don't know if you are aware that Cameron had already used the referendum ploy twice, and both times had been successful. One on whether "first past the post" voting in elections should be replaced by proportional reresentation and one on Scottish independence. So he had shut the mouths of two sets of minority agitators, and he thought he could do it a third time to shut up Nigel Farage. I started a thread at the time on the question, and the resspondents thought he would probably pull off the trick once again.

Why did he fail? This was his opportunity to blackmail concessions from the EU about their methods of working and present the electorate with a better deal. But no visible concessions were made, and thus his case had become "The EU is no better than it was before, but let's stay anyway". So the collective arrogance of the EU leadership, which was even more visible in the years that followed, is an important part of the problem. They blamed him after the event, but they should have been blaming themselves.




posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 04:00 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



I was aware of the referendums on Scottish independence and the UK's electoral system. Your analysis of Cameron's motivations behind the Brexit Referendum is interesting and likely correct. I don't wish to derail this thread by delving too far into well covered Brexit and the EU topics.

However, Margaret Thatcher's opposition to German reunification fits into the context of this topic. Her fear of The German Problem has not emerged. The looming creation of an EU Military, potentially raises the possibility of The German Problem, returning to haunt western Europe. But I am in danger of drifting too far off topic.

Today, foreign policy refer to The New Germany Problem. The New German Problem refers to the issue of Germany economically dominating the EU/Western Europe. One might add Germany has achieved with the EU, what they failed to to do in WW1 and WW2. In the guise of the EU, Germany has gained (economic) dominance over western Europe and a degree of sovereignty over Greece.

The may reader may infer two points from my above points. Firstly, The (not so new?) German Problem may indicate the source of future flash points across western Europe. Secondly, yes, this was also a subtler commentary on the geopolitical and geoeconomic winds swirling around Brexit.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.


edit on 17-12-2019 by xpert11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2019 @ 04:06 AM
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a reply to: xpert11
There is the further complication of the migrant isuue, common to both sides of the Atlantic- and in the European case being driven by Merkel's desire to have more workers in Germany. There is potential here to tie in with your theme.



posted on Dec, 19 2019 @ 02:35 PM
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Continuing the theme of parallels; perhaps there is a parallel between the current impeachment process (using the law for political purposes) and the drama over the British Supreme Court ruling against Boris in the autumn. Especially since the very existence of a British Supreme Court with "separate powers" ambitions is a deliberate Americanisation of the system carried out by Tony Blair.



posted on Dec, 20 2019 @ 12:28 PM
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I've just seen this on Twitter;

ast day of parliament and #WithdrawalAgreementBill is finally passed.
We'll have to wait until 2020 till #PrimeMinister Johnson is impeached.

I could not resist asking him "How?"



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