It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

2nd-known interstellar visitor rounds the sun

page: 1
18

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 10:23 AM
link   


Astronomers last week (December 12, 2019) released new Hubble Space Telescope images of 2I/Borisov – the second-known interstellar object – shortly before and shortly after its December 8 perihelion. Those images are historic in and of themselves; we’ve never before witnessed an interstellar object sweeping closest to our sun.

2I/Borisov – discovered on August 30, 2019, by comet hunter Gennady Borisov in Crimea, and now characterized as a comet – was about twice as far as Earth from the sun at its closest, on the inner edge of the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

So its December 8 passage nearest our sun wasn’t a close passage for a comet. But – since comets are most active when they sweep closest to a star – astronomers hoped to see 2I/Borisov exhibit an outburst or other activity.




It was pointed out to me in another thread that this is not really the "2nd-known interstellar visitor". I used the title from the story that the OP links to.

I am interested to see if 2I/Borisov exhibits any unusual activity as it interacts with our Sun.

A sample from an "interstellar visitor" could shed light on the many unknowns of our universe. I hope in the future a sample can be taken from an "interstellar visitor".




posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 10:44 AM
link   
we really need to intercept one of these objects. I'm I'll informed as to if we haven't yet, I know we've landed and extracted samples from a comet.

who knows what new physics or chemistry we can learn from these objects



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 10:51 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz



we really need to intercept one of these objects. I'm I'll informed as to if we haven't yet


We haven't had enough advanced notice to intercept one. We need to park a probe somewhat near the Sun and wait for the next one. It would be a gamble so I doubt it will be done. If we get a couple years notice that one is coming to visit, maybe NASA would try to get a sample.



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 11:15 AM
link   

originally posted by: LookingAtMars
a reply to: odzeandennz



we really need to intercept one of these objects. I'm I'll informed as to if we haven't yet


We haven't had enough advanced notice to intercept one. We need to park a probe somewhat near the Sun and wait for the next one. It would be a gamble so I doubt it will be done. If we get a couple years notice that one is coming to visit, maybe NASA would try to get a sample.


We are already on a planet 'near the sun'.

We have no idea when, where or what trajectory an extra-solar object may take.

It would be possible to have a rocket with a probe maintained, fueled and ready on the launch pad, here on Earth, but having one sitting in space, somewhere near the sun, is problematic.

It may be that we don't see another such object for centuries and considering how little we do know of so many objects that orbit reliably, it would be a waste of resources.



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 11:26 AM
link   
a reply to: chr0naut



We are already on a planet 'near the sun'.


I guess it is all relative.




what trajectory an extra-solar object may take


We know it will go around the Sun. We don't know when. As I said it would be a gamble.



It would be possible to have a rocket with a probe maintained, fueled and ready on the launch pad, here on Earth


That may work better. I guess it all depends on how much notice we have.



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 11:34 AM
link   
Is it know at all if this is orbiting another star, or is it a rouge object, that our star may capture at some point?



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 12:16 PM
link   
a reply to: rom12345

I don't think it orbits any star. I am not an astrophysicist though, so more research is required.


There is info on the path at this link.

The Path of Comet 2I/Borisov

Also this information.



The best chance to see it is during December when it makes its closest approach to the Sun (December 8) and the Earth (December 28). The comet will then be passing through the constellations Crater and Hydra.

At mid-northern latitudes, these are fairly low and to the south about two hours before sunrise. The comet will be much too dim to see without a telescope, and it'll be a challenge even in fairly large amateur instruments. Its maximum brightness is currently predicted to be only magnitude 15, about as faint as Pluto.





edit on 15-12-2019 by LookingAtMars because: add vid



posted on Dec, 16 2019 @ 09:29 AM
link   
a reply to: LookingAtMars

Supposedly some interstellar objects may have already impacted earth. One was January 6, 2014, close to Manus Island, Papua New Guinea. Maybe we could find one.

www.cnn.com...



new topics

top topics



 
18

log in

join