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So What is Everyone Making for Turkey Day?

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posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe

The thread isn't about charity. Besides, bragging about what you give, where, and how much takes your act away from selfless giving and into the realm of bragging just as much as anything you perceive here. It's an act of pride more than one of selflessness.

See how good and virtuous I am? Rather than eat a nice meal once a year, I gave it all to the homeless. Ergo, I am better than you.

Allow me to tell you this much: roasting a whole turkey like this is actually a semi-regular thing for us. We get more than one meal from it. The leftovers from this one bird will feed us for this week. We will make stock off the carcass that will go into several pots of soup/stew or where we need broth for the next 3 to 4 months starting with pot of turkey chili next week that will completely polish off the meat from this bird.

Considering we spent less than $1/lb on the bird, I'd say this is far from a grossly lavish feast we're having tomorrow.




posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:21 PM
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Wife just had major spinal surgery on Monday, so it's looking like the hospital cafeteria Thanksgiving for us. She might get discharged today, but more likely sometime tomorrow.

Maybe I'll cook up a breast on Sunday?



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:22 PM
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I plan on hauling this creamy chocolate cheesecake to my sister's house. I make it with a nice, thick Oreo cookie crust.




posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:25 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Lagomorphe

The thread isn't about charity. Besides, bragging about what you give, where, and how much takes your act away from selfless giving and into the realm of bragging just as much as anything you perceive here. It's an act of pride more than one of selflessness.

See how good and virtuous I am? Rather than eat a nice meal once a year, I gave it all to the homeless. Ergo, I am better than you.

Allow me to tell you this much: roasting a whole turkey like this is actually a semi-regular thing for us. We get more than one meal from it. The leftovers from this one bird will feed us for this week. We will make stock off the carcass that will go into several pots of soup/stew or where we need broth for the next 3 to 4 months starting with pot of turkey chili next week that will completely polish off the meat from this bird.

Considering we spent less than $1/lb on the bird, I'd say this is far from a grossly lavish feast we're having tomorrow.


Enjoy if it makes you feel good👍



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:26 PM
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originally posted by: usernameconspiracy
Wife just had major spinal surgery on Monday, so it's looking like the hospital cafeteria Thanksgiving for us. She might get discharged today, but more likely sometime tomorrow.

Maybe I'll cook up a breast on Sunday?


I'd say take your time on the meal. Nice meals can wait until you and she are both ready to appreciate them. Thanksgiving is as much a celebration of the harvest as it is a time to be thankful and count blessings. I see no reason why those 2 things can't wait a few days or weeks even until you're ready.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:27 PM
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originally posted by: Lagomorphe

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Lagomorphe

The thread isn't about charity. Besides, bragging about what you give, where, and how much takes your act away from selfless giving and into the realm of bragging just as much as anything you perceive here. It's an act of pride more than one of selflessness.

See how good and virtuous I am? Rather than eat a nice meal once a year, I gave it all to the homeless. Ergo, I am better than you.

Allow me to tell you this much: roasting a whole turkey like this is actually a semi-regular thing for us. We get more than one meal from it. The leftovers from this one bird will feed us for this week. We will make stock off the carcass that will go into several pots of soup/stew or where we need broth for the next 3 to 4 months starting with pot of turkey chili next week that will completely polish off the meat from this bird.

Considering we spent less than $1/lb on the bird, I'd say this is far from a grossly lavish feast we're having tomorrow.


Enjoy if it makes you feel good👍


Piss on everyone else's enjoyment then. Clearly, that's the only spice in your life.,



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: Lagomorphe

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Lagomorphe

The thread isn't about charity. Besides, bragging about what you give, where, and how much takes your act away from selfless giving and into the realm of bragging just as much as anything you perceive here. It's an act of pride more than one of selflessness.

See how good and virtuous I am? Rather than eat a nice meal once a year, I gave it all to the homeless. Ergo, I am better than you.

Allow me to tell you this much: roasting a whole turkey like this is actually a semi-regular thing for us. We get more than one meal from it. The leftovers from this one bird will feed us for this week. We will make stock off the carcass that will go into several pots of soup/stew or where we need broth for the next 3 to 4 months starting with pot of turkey chili next week that will completely polish off the meat from this bird.

Considering we spent less than $1/lb on the bird, I'd say this is far from a grossly lavish feast we're having tomorrow.


Enjoy if it makes you feel good👍


Honestly, it's a modest meal. Turkey is cheap, and each dish like mashed potatoes or stuffing is dollars as well.

The whole point is you have a traditional meal, but you're thankful for those you spend it with. Thanksgiving is one of the holidays I see extended family I don't normally have the opportunity to see, I'm not alone in that regard.

I think you are missing the whole point of this holiday.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker

Truth there.

The only dish I listed we go out of our way for is the stuffing. The rest is made with modest ingredients. The magic there is in the preparation.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:40 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: CriticalStinker

Truth there.

The only dish I listed we go out of our way for is the stuffing. The rest is made with modest ingredients. The magic there is in the preparation.


Yea, typically the only variations I see in dishes are how people executed it... The ingredients typically tend to be the same or very close.

The only reason I'm doing variations instead of the typical is I'm cooking for a friendsgiving, so I'm sure they'll have already had the "traditional" meal.

That, and I think technically duck is considered traditional seeing as the early stories just specified wild fowl which could have been turkey or duck.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker

I've wanted to try goose one of these years, but those suckers are really expensive!



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: CriticalStinker

I've wanted to try goose one of these years, but those suckers are really expensive!



Yea, I noticed that, and also, I've never had goose.

The duck I got was a steal... Almost 8 pounds for 17 bucks. The feeling of luxury without breaking the wallet.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Messy as hell but tastes phenomenal.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny


I plan on hauling this creamy chocolate cheesecake to my sister's house. I make it with a nice, thick Oreo cookie crust.


Looks great, but a lot of work?!

I just did a trial run on a no bake pumpkin cheesecake pie that turned out absolutely delicious for something so simple and only took 10 minutes to throw together without baking!

1 - 8 oz. block of cream cheese
1 cup of pumpkin puree
1/2 cup of suger
1/2 tsp of pumpkin spice

Mix with electric beater and then fold in 2 cups of whipped cream before placing in a crushed pecan ready to use pie crust. Refrigerate for 3 hours. Yum!


edit on 27-11-2019 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe

I donate to the less fortunate every Friday, so I don't feel compelled to do it on Thursday too.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:25 PM
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As for the main meal...

Smoked turkey (did this for the first time last year and will never go back to anything else)
Stuffing (Seasoned bread crumbs, celery, onion, mushrooms)
Grandma's homemade noodles (the kids demand it)
Mashed Sweet Potatoes (choice of butter and/or brown sugar)
Spinach salad (family favorite - spinach topped with strawberries, mandarin oranges, red onion, pecans, poppy seed dressing)
Baked Beans - (this is a must with smoked meats for me - choice of beans with barbecue sauce, ketchup, spicy brown mustard, Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar, onions, red and green bell peppers, topped with bacon)
Green bean casserole or cream cheese corn

The cream cheesey corn has been a long family favorite. You'll love it. Did the recipe ask for you to combine cheddar cheese cubes with the cream cheese?





edit on 27-11-2019 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: Deetermined

What's "Grandma's homemade noodles"?

Baked beans is an interesting tradition.

Our unusual item (which I neglected to mention in the OP) is boiled pearl onions.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Grandma's noodles are just that. Flour, egg, and baking powder mixed together to make dough that has to be rolled out and cut with a pizza cutter to get the noodles as thin as possible. Boil them in chicken broth for approximately 20 minutes and they're done. My husband's mother used to insist on making everything from scratch and the noodles are just one thing that the kids associate with grandma, holidays, and comfort food.

ETA: When I make them I add melted butter to give them more flavor and make the dough easier to work with.


edit on 27-11-2019 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I agree. The day and the meal isn't nearly as important as the people.

The meal is just the fun part...whenever it takes place.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: usernameconspiracy
Wife just had major spinal surgery on Monday, so it's looking like the hospital cafeteria Thanksgiving for us. She might get discharged today, but more likely sometime tomorrow.

Maybe I'll cook up a breast on Sunday?


Hopefully the spinal surgery went well. And if it did, and you and your wife are together are eating cafeteria food on Thanksgiving, that sounds like it fits the true bill of the holiday.

I hope she has a speedy recovery, and that you two may enjoy a more home cooked meal soon to cash the raincheck



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 02:39 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: ketsuko

I agree. The day and the meal isn't nearly as important as the people.

The meal is just the fun part...whenever it takes place.



Thanksgiving is actually one of my favorite family holidays. It's not bastardized like Christmas, it's just a modest day where you celebrate breaking bread with those you love.

Ironically, many people aren't really super found of the spread. The proof is that turkeys don't really sell the rest of the year. But something about that day, and that day alone makes people look forward to it, because it's not just about the food. It's about having it with those you care about, and making a tradition of it.



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