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Koalas are.... or aren't functionally extinct

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posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 06:53 AM
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Since when is 80,000 not enough of a species to breed successfully? I swear this number keeps going up, when reality clearly disagrees. Sure inbreeding is bad, but it's not THAT bad. We have species alive today breeding successfully that can be linked to two adults breeding from two birds of slightly different breeds (one from a different island that got lost), who's children only breeded within the new hybrid family, creating a whole seperate species, then nearly all dying off (due to a storm not malformities), bottle necking AGAIN, and are still doing fine today.

Now I'm aware these are birds, and mammals have more issues with inbreeding than birds do, but it's not anywhere near so bad that 80,000 should come anywhere near breeding death for an entire species...
edit on 11/26/2019 by Puppylove because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 07:21 AM
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Set them free here in San Diego we have plenty of eucalyptus trees lol that would be just as crazy as seeing a chicken outside of the carls jr in a tree for a couple months.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 07:27 AM
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80,000? They're better off than Cali condors (170 captive; 276 wild) and black-footed ferrets (300 in zoos; 500 in the wild), both of which have been re-introduced back to the wild from the brink and have less members intheir species.
edit on 26-11-2019 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-11-2019 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

It isn’t the strongest species that survives, but the most adaptable to change. We should allow nature to take its course. Nature always wins in the end.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: DrumsRfun
I came across this tear jerker just today.

No clue why this won't embed so here is the link.
www.youtube.com...






Take out from and including the ampersand forward as well.

edit on 26-11-2019 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 02:12 PM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: ketsuko

It isn’t the strongest species that survives, but the most adaptable to change. We should allow nature to take its course. Nature always wins in the end.


I agree and disagree. When we bring species together or create an extinction through changes almost nothing could easily adapt, then I think intervention is warranted. But fires are a natural event that happen with or without human intervention. Anything that can't adapt to fire is in real trouble.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

I'm cynical.

There's been bush fires in Australia since the first little Koala climbed his first eucalyptus tree.

And - there's still still Koalas.

Now the hunting part? Yeah, that might be a huge factor here... But fires? I'd have a hard time believing the cute little cuddlie (that will rip your face off) will succumb to anything natural.

'Man' I'd say - before fire.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 03:02 PM
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The bush fires may have a short term negative effect on Koala populations, but'll actually have a long term positive effect on the Koalas that survived.

That's because gum trees have evolved not only to survive bush fires, but also to thrive after a bush fire... The bush fires have burnt all the old highly toxic gum leafs from the tree's, which Koalas tend to avoid anyway, and within weeks the trees will begin bursting with lush clumps of fresh low toxic foliage, which is what Koalas need to thrive.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 03:48 PM
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Everything you ever needed to know, right here:


edit on 26-11-2019 by TheTruthRocks because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: ketsuko

It isn’t the strongest species that survives, but the most adaptable to change. We should allow nature to take its course. Nature always wins in the end.


We would need to stop removing their "nature", in order to just let that happen. IMHO We need to make it a priority to think about those things long term.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko
a reply to: Puppylove

Yeah, that is what I was wondering.
80,000 seems like an awfully big number.

Now, I've read here that some or the habitats are like virtual enclosures as the koalas cannot move into different areas to get their eucalyptus.
But, you'd think with the intervention of Australian preservation groups, they could help that situation.

I think there is a good possibility the MSM is making more of this that is warranted.
Not saying fake news, but perhaps agenda driven.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus
Um, we interfere with nature constantly




posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: ketsuko
a reply to: Puppylove

I think there is a good possibility the MSM is making more of this that is warranted.


Possibly... personally, I doubt with all the conservation programs going on that there's any chance of koalas actually going extinct, or even being close to extinct.

But then again, there's nothing wrong with keeping your guard up when it comes to preserving the existence of these amazingly unique animals. After all, we all saw what happened to the tassie tiger... Here today then gone tomorrow.



posted on Nov, 26 2019 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: vonclod
a reply to: Metallicus
Um, we interfere with nature constantly





Yeah, the animals adapt to nature well, not so well to humans though.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 07:37 AM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa

Yeah, though with the right fuzzy having issues, you can use their cuteness to coax people into donating the help the fuzzies. Koala's are cute and adored by many. My worry here is that some may be trying to take advantage of the koala's cuteness to drum up fear about their continued existence to open a program to skim from for personal wealth. It's the 80,000 number that clues me in, and the constantly increasing required populace for a species survival.

I'm all for conservation efforts, but, I'm also against fraud, and am skeptical of anything that looks like it might be leading to fraud, or involves manipulating the heart strings of the gullible.

80,000 is a fine populace, or it most definitely should be. At best, it might be a cause for keeping a close eye on them, but it's not this koala armageddon it's being made out to be.

I think peeps are trying to pull on the heart strings of the gullible to cash in on the fuzzies. By all means keep an eye on them in case the due come under real threat, but in the meantime there are many animals far more threatened and actually do fall into the kind of issues they are trying to convince us the koalas have.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 08:12 AM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

This is pic from Bally's backyard to give you an idea how devastating for the koalas in the area it would have been, and it's not just the koalas that were getting decimated.



There's was a recent study into koala numbers in the northern rivers area and scientists were surprised at how many koalas were indeed out and about, many more than they previously thought.

I can't say how accurate these reports are in the op but can be sure any koalas caught out in the recent firestorm are toast, and the fires will continue burning until we get rain which doesn't look to be anytime soon.

I'm going to do a thread at some point soon about the devastation where bally lives, it's pretty full on decimation over a massive area.


On the plus side though, just think of all the spiders that burnt to death. Is there someway to round them up and force them towards the next bush fire?


As to Bally's area, doesn't the flora / fauna regenerate quickly after wildfires? I always thought that was one of the bonuses? (but may be very wrong about that).



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 11:34 AM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

This is pic from Bally's backyard to give you an idea how devastating for the koalas in the area it would have been, and it's not just the koalas that were getting decimated.





G'day Hope. Again, thanks for your visit. Your pic really does justice to the scene around me.

As you know, the smaller space and trees around my house were cleaned regularly and I was able to save my good trees. Have roos and other wildlife back around the place. Someone dropped some bags of roo feed/pellets and some lucerne hay on the block. I think that's because it's one of the few remaining places that the animals can get up pick up my way.

Birds are nesting in the trees near the building including crows along with the magpies, butcher birds and kookaburras.

My only advice to those that grow Eucalyptus trees is to cut away the lower hanging branches up to 2 or 3 meters and keep dry matter away from them. I burn regularly each winter and try to ensure there is no fuel beneath the trees. This lessens the tree's explosive material. Unfortunately I can't do the whole forest. The neighbors I used to have complained a lot when we went about our business of protecting the surrounds.

Just touching on what you say, can you believe this, an armchair warrior got on our local village social media site advising not to feed the wildlife after the fires. Being an expert in his own head he went on about that the fauna should be allowed to exist naturally. True perhaps, but look what happened! Leastways I still have my pocket of native animals on my selection and I will sustain them as your pic demonstrates. There is nothing left outside my ring of fire.

Kind regards, PM sent.

Bally




posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: bally001

So, in your opinion, are these fires a bit like the ones we have in Cali and due somewhat to forest mismanagement? You said it - the treest are suited to burn badly if not handled correctly and burned of regularly. California's ecosystem has plants that depend on fire to propagate but the forestry practice has been to prevent burns at all costs leading to explosive fires thanks to brush build-up.



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: bally001

So, in your opinion, are these fires a bit like the ones we have in Cali and due somewhat to forest mismanagement? You said it - the treest are suited to burn badly if not handled correctly and burned of regularly. California's ecosystem has plants that depend on fire to propagate but the forestry practice has been to prevent burns at all costs leading to explosive fires thanks to brush build-up.



Thanks for you reply ketsuko. To be honest I am not qualified in that respect to pass opinion on fires in other countries. I do see a common denominator in some wildfires overseas and that's where Australian Eucalyptus have been propagated. They are a hardy tree, shady, good wood, range of types and colors and can be selected to grow almost any where.

I manage those close to my habitat. They are still standing along with the micro-ism (if that's a good word) of flora and fauna, I saved this small spot but lost a lot as Hopenotfeariswhatweneed may testify. My reason for asking him to come and take some pics as I could not describe it in adequate terms.

I am not critical or angry to those around me who probably thought I was some sort of nut with my bush management and preparation ideas over 6 years. Sadly they lost their homes except my immediate neighbor who sided with me and I saved his house too. I work better by myself and stick to my plans hence sending the missus, child and dogs away along with the neighbors to evacuate at short notice, very little time.

In my humble opinion, better management practices would save a lost of bush/forest but I'm up against it with those persons who do not wish to clear safe spaces or havens and with the authorities in a sense who are the experts and know better than me.

I'm happy I still have my animals, some trees and a house.

Kind regards,

Bally



posted on Nov, 27 2019 @ 01:03 PM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

originally posted by: vonclod
a reply to: Metallicus
Um, we interfere with nature constantly





Yeah, the animals adapt to nature well, not so well to humans though.


Some can, like raccoons, but few and far between..I'm praying you guys get some rain!




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