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Scientists discover potential cure for alcoholism in the brain

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posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 12:00 AM
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originally posted by: valve
That’s why I made the distinction.

But the occasional use of alcohol doesn't cause a hard and fast come down even though it has a short half life, so the theory isn't consistent.

Also, I don't know how bad the barbiturate withdrawals you went through were but were they life threatening like they can be for a long term heavy drinker?
edit on 25-11-2019 by daskakik because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 12:08 AM
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originally posted by: daskakik

originally posted by: valve
That’s why I made the distinction.

But the occasional use of alcohol doesn't cause a hard and fast come down even though it has a short half life, so the theory isn't consistent.

Also, I don't know how bad the barbiturate withdrawals you went through were but were they life threatening like they can be for a long term heavy drinker?


I agree with you on the alcohol. Moderation is always key. As far as the alcohol/barbiturate comparison, I would say alcohol withdrawal = very brutal, but quick. Barbiturates= long, drawn out misery. Very much like a bad flu.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 12:08 AM
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DBL
edit on 25-11-2019 by valve because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 12:10 AM
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a reply to: valve




Moderation is always key.

Moderation doesn't help an alcoholic.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 12:40 AM
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a reply to: valve

All I was pointing out was that, with alcohol, it isn't the short half life that makes it brutal. It is, from what I have read, the continued use for long periods of time that causes that reaction from abstinence.

Just looking at a substance's half life might not be conclusive and you did say "The difference with any substance is it’s half-life."


edit on 25-11-2019 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 01:04 AM
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I drink 4 litres of Beer every night, sometimes more, sometimes less, have been since I was 18, now mid 40's. I farking love it, the crack of the can and chugging the first one right down, to below half (500ml cans), love the buzz, make me interested in films, games and food.

And then i wake up, sometimes completely blank memory and my actual memory is getting worse, even though I love it, its not good for me so I am cutting down, having at least a week off a month and maybe two and getting more exercise, ideally I would like to not drink on work nights as I risk being over the drink drive limit every morning.

I have one night of sweats and shakes, perhaps two then no more physical symptoms but mentally I am itching for another beer and I cannot go a week without fighting it, the taste, the buzz...

Smoking on the other hand, is something I pick up or dont, so for example, I know if I am going away with work for a few days I will buy a pack of fags or more if longer, the minute I return I stop, no cravings not need. I went on holiday for a month and smoked a bit (was staying with old buddies who smoke) and I was like a chimney, had my last one, flew home a couple of days later and didnt have another until the annual golf day when I always take a pack.

Incidentally what i was younger I smoked for a few years then one day just stopped without a craving.

Weird how I have no physical addiction to nicotine which is notoriously addictive but live for the beer.
edit on 25 11 2019 by Forensick because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 02:01 AM
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a reply to: Forensick
I just have to go back to the findings in the OP. Individuals are different, to a point.

Predisposed to alcohol, not to nicotine, but everyone is predisposed to opioids.

Makes me think about a guy I met in the early 90's who was sharing, "I have done everything, but crack? I'm afraid of that, cause I know that if I even try it, I'm going to love it." Not the exact words cause he cursed a little more.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 02:21 AM
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I think we need to make a distinction between physiological and psychological dependence.

As Phage has pointed out your body quickly forms a dependence to a substance like heroin and the only alcoholic i know suffered severe withdrawal when giving up alcohol to the point he was hospitalised with sickness, dizziness, loss of bowel control etc. He was prescribed Valium from his GP which he just ended up abusing as well. I really think some people are just hiding emotional pain and will use whatever drug they can find to take the edge off whatever psychological turmoil they can't face sober. If you find the root cause of their drug use and change their other habits then i think it's a good step in the right direction to conquer addiction. People that find themselves in a hole need a reason to quit.

For the record i believe heroin is just refined morphine and they have very similar effects. I felt no need at all to use it once the pain was gone. In fact i didn't enjoy the floating feeling i had when using it. Heroin is such a destructive drug, you have to wonder why people would even try it in the first place.

In my late twenties i also tried Cocaine over the course of around 6 months. Again, just didn't enjoy the feeling and had no craving to use it again. Yet i have friends who take it every weekend and get really upset if they can't source it. A lot of the time people are chasing a state of mind, i guess if you are happy within yourself then addiction is less likely to take hold.

With substances like tobacco and weed i think its more psychological in nature as their only withdrawal symptoms are anxiety etc. That said it took me 5 years on and off to eventually kick my daily smoking habit. Even now in the right setting i'll smoke a joint if relaxing with old friends, or have a cigarette if i get drunk at a party.


edit on 25/11/19 by Grenade because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 06:06 AM
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originally posted by: daskakik
a reply to: one4all
I don't mean to knock what you have brought here but people do move on to sobriety, at least for some amount of time, after detoxing with valium and xanax. According to your post, the onslaught of parasites should make this impossible if they are just masking symptoms.

Had a friend go through detox with valium IV and then prescribed xanax. He took the xanax for 2 days and then decided to stop taking it. He went 2 months after that without a drink. Where was the scream from his sick body during those 2 months?

Just spit-balling here. This is why I brought up the alcohol resistant parasite, maybe they more efficiently use alcohol as an energy source. It causes the craving and in turn gets rid of competition. So everything is going great for them. But if the well runs dry and they start to get stressed, what if during this, they dump something into your blood stream that causes withdrawals?

Someone tries an anti-parasitic protocol and kills and flushes them out before they can release their stress induced substances? Then you have the success stories you mentioned but that parasite would have to be the cause and if it isn't then the treatment would not work.

You will often hear there is no single magic bullet.


I am not postulating...I am speaking from Personal experience and witnessed experiences of others ….and the drugs masked the post-sobriety symptoms.Everyone reacts the same ways to parasitic impacts....diets are the mitigating factor.Regularly intaking an anti-parasitic will eliminate these symptoms and the illnesses connected to them.

You are talking about using pharmaceutical drugs to mask the central nervous systems messenging processes...long enough for the body to become solidly infested with multiple types of parasites.....once the bugs are in and firmly established the Red-Flag warnings from your body change and diminish to some degrees.....soooo...all you are suggesting is sabatoging yourself with Pharma poisons and setting yourself up for sickness and disease.

Soome say to try Auhwasca to begin with and start by cleaning out the parasites in your brain the hardest to get to....it only gets easier from there on.I personally do not discuss anything I have not experienced .
edit on 25-11-2019 by one4all because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-11-2019 by one4all because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: one4all
You talked about an onslaught if an anti-parasitic isn't used but I posted about a case, which I witnessed fist hand, where the person discontinued "pharma poisons" without using an anti-parasitic and didn't experience what you propose for 2 months.

Sorry, if you can't accept that maybe not every case of alcoholism fits your theory.
edit on 25-11-2019 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Rather than giving alcoholics a little lobotomy to keep them from drinking, why not just look for a cheaper, safer alternative to give those folks who want to take some of the sharp edges off existence? Oh, wait there already is one. At least one.

I like to think that it's everyone's individual choice as to how they want to deal with this horror of a world, and unless it hurts somebody, how they want do it is really nobody's business but theirs.


Alcoholism is a living hell....

The alcoholic is no longer "taking the edge off" they are drinking to stave off horrible deadly withdrawal....

While living a miserable existence in a deteriorated mind and body.

And they are powerless over the addiction.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: trollz

Great.... for alcoholic mice.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 10:48 AM
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a reply to: Homefree

The industry doesnt need alcoholics to sustain it. There is enough demand from the general public.
Right now its the only legal buzz in most states.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 10:49 AM
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originally posted by: one4all

originally posted by: daskakik

originally posted by: one4all
I stopped cold turkey using parasitic relief methods as the only support

Care to share?


My earlier post outlines the process as it works in your brain...you simply replace alcohol with a stronger anti-parasitic of which there are only a few because Alcohol is so effective....MJ used in non-combustive forms happens to be one if it is legal in your neck of the woods....if not the Hulda Clark protocal will work dandy as candy.....remember you are simply retraining your brain there is no secret majic to it....so be patient and give it a week to kick in....set constant and consistant times spaced widely apart so your body can develop a growing affinity to its new best friend.....in extremely short order your brain will forget about the booze and only remember its new stronger friend.Just a week or two to mbed the message and then consistant applications of dewormer that doesn't come with the name Alcohol.

Remember an alcoholic has actually trained their body to utilise one of the worlds most effective anti-parasitics…..its just that the message to stop after a single drink when the bugs are dead gets lost in the translation.

Overdrinking is not a poor personal decision or a poor moral choice....lol...nope we are tricked plain and simple....some really smart Anti-humanitarian Terrorists thought it would be a good idea to screw us all over and make Trillions doing it by taking advantage of and harnessing a simple Natural fact that they have intentionally suppressed from all of is in terms of complete knowledge.

I have experienced a 100% success rate amongst Friends and Family who have used this method. Five People have corrected their brains receptors and have stopped Alcohol use cold turkey.None including myself have returned to drinking and that's Six people in total.





I call BS

The addict mind and the phenomenon of craving manifests in many different ways.....

The inability to have just one drink is the same mental process of not being able to have just one Oreo.....

It's the disease of addiction.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Grenade

Morphine is not the same thing as heroin.

I was on Demerol for a week after abdominal surgery. Never seemed to get a recognizable buzz, maybe the anesthetic effect used that up. I sure knew when I needed another fix.

No physical withdrawal effects after that but several nights of very disturbing dreams. I don't know if it was related.

But Demerol is not the same thing as heroin. And alcoholism seems to be something else entirely.


Morphine and Demerol are strong opiates just like heroin.....

They all do the same thing to addicts and normies, just at varying speeds due to the strengths...

Alcoholism is simply addiction to the drug alcohol.....

Alcohol addiction and the consequences can be just as, if not more so severe than heroin addiction......

It's all the same disease, just with different looks..



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 11:27 AM
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Opiate addiction is avoidable....granted it's a stickier trap....

The people who can use a prescription of painkillers as prescribed and stop when the doctor says are the same people who can drink socially.....

We addicts call them "normies"

I believe alcoholism and drug addiction are one in the same.

The path, however, to opiate addiction is much broader and easier to walk down..
edit on 25-11-2019 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-11-2019 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-11-2019 by GoShredAK because: Oops



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 11:30 AM
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originally posted by: GoShredAK
And they are powerless over the addiction.

That AA stuff is just brainwashing propaganda designed to promote religion. As comedian Doug Stanhope says, "There's no such thing as addiction, only things that people like doing more than life." Which when you honestly think about it, makes sense because life is an ongoing horror that only gets worse with time and eventually leads to a miserable end.

Addiction? Well, most people agree that heroin is pretty addicting but a study they did of US servicemen who were "addicted" to heroin in Vietnam showed that once they were sent home and out of the stressful environment, approximately 95 percent of them quit cold turkey.
www.npr.org...

So don't give me that nonsense about anything being too hard to quit. Maybe a tiny bit of it has to do with physiology. But most of this kind of behavior is a result of a combination of environment, access, social interactions and good old fashioned willpower and not whether or not a person degrades themselves before a deity of some sort.

But hey, maybe these guys working with alcoholic mice will find other areas in our brains to burn out with a laser that will help us quit all of our bad habits. No brain = no pain.
edit on 25-11-2019 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Addiction? Well, most people agree that heroin is pretty addicting but a study they did of US servicemen who were "addicted" to heroin in Vietnam showed that once they were sent home and out of the stressful environment, approximately 95 percent of them quit cold turkey.

This seems to fit with Dr. Ameisen's theory. Stress/anxiety is the underlying cause of alcoholism and maybe other types of substance abuse.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 12:40 PM
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originally posted by: daskakik

originally posted by: Blue Shift
Addiction? Well, most people agree that heroin is pretty addicting but a study they did of US servicemen who were "addicted" to heroin in Vietnam showed that once they were sent home and out of the stressful environment, approximately 95 percent of them quit cold turkey.

This seems to fit with Dr. Ameisen's theory. Stress/anxiety is the underlying cause of alcoholism and maybe other types of substance abuse.

Since I have a degree in Sociology, I tend to also think that a person's social environment plays a huge role in the process. People will do anything to conform to group behavior. If a person really wants to stop drinking to what they feel might be an excess, they basically need to remove themselves from whatever social situation they're in. Divorce if your marriage is crappy. Quit your job if it's stressful and filled with other people who like to medicate with alcohol. Pack up, leave, get the hell out. Oh, well that's hard they would say. What about my family? You mean the family that's driving you to drink? Fine. Keep drinking and die. Sometimes you gotta make hard decisions if you want to live. If not, keep drinking. Or do something else that will kill you faster so you'll cause less problems for other people.



posted on Nov, 25 2019 @ 01:13 PM
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originally posted by: daskakik

originally posted by: valve
That’s why I made the distinction.

But the occasional use of alcohol doesn't cause a hard and fast come down even though it has a short half life, so the theory isn't consistent.

Also, I don't know how bad the barbiturate withdrawals you went through were but were they life threatening like they can be for a long term heavy drinker?


The occasional use of opiates does not cause a fast hard comedown at all.....it's actually rather easy on the body, and instead of a alcohol hangover there is a pleasant afterglow...

What happens is physical dependence occurs rapidly and the user quickly finds them self using only to feel ok...

Stimulants like meth or coke on the other hand, provide that hard fast comedown...




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