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Rural people are bad and make bad decisions

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posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: PhilbertDezineck
a reply to: Notoneofyou

You sure opened a can of worms here, so I will add to it. Cost. What does it cost to run utilities to a sub division compared to a home ten miles out of town? Do they pay extra to run and maintain these rural services? Clearing snow through out town whats the cost compared to plowing 10 miles of road so a person can get to their rural home? Do they pay extra in taxes? No that would be unfair.



Whoa there, Hoss!!

You actually think the city folk pay the overhead burden on the additional utility costs for rural customers???? LOL!! Hardly!! We pay MORE!! Our utility co-op stops at the utility right of way on the nearest County road, and our rates are all based on the capital costs to bring the power that far. From there, it's up to us to extend power...AT OUR COST! So, for example, I needed 3 phase power in our out building. The nearest 3 phase power was 4 miles away. Guess who got to pay for the line upgrade from single phase to 3 phase to the entire power line??? I needed to run power up to the building, which required a pole line, 3 poles up the hill and all the line work. That was another $50k...another $50k that YOU didn't pay, but I did. So, we actually pay more for utilities than those subdivision dwellers! Because many times we have to pay not only the usage charges, but also for the capital improvement costs to get the infrastructure there in the first place!

Do you actually think they even plow at all to most of our rural areas??? Please come remind me of that next time it snows so I can leave all the equipment in the out-building and not plow our 2+ miles of road! So I can save the gallons of diesel fuel keeping everything warmed up, so I can sleep in and not be starting equipment all the time when it's below zero! So I can save the hundreds of gallons of diesel fuel I use actually plowing and clearing the roads. Heck, so I can sell the dump truck we use to haul the snow to the snow dump when we have nowhere left to pile it! That'd be great!

**shakin' my head** I swear!




posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Face it; they'll never get it. Some people can't see past their own 9-to-5, regulated lifestyle.

If I was an evil person, I would suggest one year of strike from the farmers. Just keep the food out here. Grocery shelves would be empty within a couple of months and the cities would crumble as people began killing each other for food. The only problem with that is the financial burden it would put on the farmers.

It's the same way with trucks. I was amazed when I discovered just how little truck drivers are thought of. Yet, everything these slickers enjoy comes on a truck, including food. The average city maintains a two-week supply or less of food for the residents. Stop the deliveries for two weeks and the attitude would change drastically, laws would be put in place to actually protect the drivers while delivering, and every driver's life would be much, much easier afterwards. But, truck drivers are a special breed... you can't get three drivers sitting at a truck stop to agree on what time it is, much less organize.

So we'll keep on keeping on out here, watching the idiocy as it continues to unfold. We don't need the slickers nor really even care what the slickers think... they're just fools who don't even know where their food comes from. And occasionally, we'll get a laugh when we get to inform some ignoramus that those hash browns they're enjoying for breakfast were dug up out of dirt with worms in it.

It's funny to watch them throw up.

TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: Notoneofyou

That's Berkeley for you. They're going bankrupt and are calling out people who aren't like them. It's just typical everyday democrat behavior.



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 09:58 AM
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originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: Notoneofyou

That's Berkeley for you. They're going bankrupt and are calling out people who aren't like them. It's just typical everyday democrat behavior.


Isn't your post calling out people who aren't like you?

🥺



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
I can walk out and piss off my back porch. Beat that.

But I guess if you have 10 Starbucks within 2 blocks that makes you better.

City folks.


I can't. If I did that my Aussie Shepherd would hit the stream about 15 times while she ran circles around me. But other than that, I can wiz pretty much anywhere on my property without the neighbors seeing me. I've even done the hooheehaha in my pool in the middle of the day but my closest neighbor was mowing his yard so he could see our heads.




posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

No. While they're not like me, I don't care what they do or how bad they screw up their own local economy and state. I'm calling them out for talking about what they don't know.

Would you like to see pictures of how Berkeley treats and thinks of those who don't think like them?



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Don't forget the price tag on our water wells.

My 6" cased potable water well ran 107ft, through 3 layers of rock.

22k for drinking water. + the pressure tank, pitless pump, heat tape, etc...



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck


Had to laugh at that. I remember the surprise on friends face when they wondered why we pick the dropped apples off ground and binned them to the processors. Apple sauce and apple juice on store shelves are not made from #1 nor#2 grade apples.

The more processed the food on the shelf is...is that way for a reason. You would never eat the original product.



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: CynConcepts

Yep! Just like those delicious, heavenly hamburgers... that's not ribeye they're grinding up into burger.

TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Notoneofyou

Wow...only 107 feet? That's not even legal here (not for domestic wells anyway, only livestock and irrigation). We had to go 800ft for the domestic well, and we've got the pump set at 680ft. And the pump for that sucker was not cheap either...and it takes a derrick to get it out because it weighs about 400lbs. All at our cost, of course!

Yeah, and I just replaced our pressure tank this past year because we blew the bladder in the other one, so I put in a new, bigger, pressure tank. Fortunately, we've got that inside, and everything else buried below the frost line outside, so no heat tape required.

BTW...you have a PM



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 10:55 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: CynConcepts

Yep! Just like those delicious, heavenly hamburgers... that's not ribeye they're grinding up into burger.

TheRedneck


Hey, wait a minute! We ground up ribeye (tenderloin, sirloin, rib roast, flank, chuck, brisket and every other cut) into our burger from the animal we had processed a couple months back. Best burger you'll ever eat!

**whispering**...it's a good way to process older cows.



edit on 11/15/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 12:18 PM
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Frankly, I think the "country folk are better than city folk" argument is as much a limp-spined one as the reverse is. Just as many people forget who PAYS their bills as who feeds them. Both rural and city alike are at fault for the animosity between them.

Focusing on rural farmers specifically, what I think is a poor life choice is selling your crop further than your region. It might make you a quicker buck, but that really hurts the local area more than it's worth. Farmers used to take great pride in keeping the food local. Preferably, I'd like to see farms keep it mostly within a few hours' drive, it forces both the farmers in each state to plan & plant better, and consumers in those states to plan and buy better (thus live a little better at the kitchen table, too)

I do my damnedest to buy from within a few hours of where I live (in a metro) when it's in season, because it just doesn't make any damn sense otherwise. My apples & juice don't come from fricking Washington, they come from orchards I can get to in 30 minutes or less. My blueberries come from the lakeshore, not Chile, cherries from a ways north. My onions come from about 30 minutes' drive. Potatoes are in-state only, we will not buy Idahoan ones, period. Truthfully, they're not as good as MI spuds anyway (grainy & bland) and MI grown are cheaper, too. We do get things like oranges and bananas occasionally, but they keyword there is occasionally, and it's a splurge when we do. We try to keep the fruit entirely local and are working on getting the kids to see out-of-state goods as a splurge item, not a necessity item.

Imported food from the opposite side of the continent/another one entirely is supposed to be a pricey splurge/luxury (see the Christmas Florida Oranges boxes of the 70s as an example) not the cheap status quo for daily life. I don't get much in the way of things that can't be grown in MI, or slaughtered here (so I really don't GAFF about Texan or similar beef/Iowan pork, Georgia chicken, etc)

Instead of trying to figure out how you can give the city slicker the figurative finger in a snide remark and them in return to you, you're SUPPOSED to help each other out. They buy your harvests/slaughters, and eat well, you take their money and pay the bills. That used to be the point of being an old-time farmer and feeding the folks closest to you in terms of distance, you had a real & vital purpose in your area that people respected.

Now everybody that owns enough land to be classified a farm in BFE USA thinks they're a farm giant in terms of importance (contracted or not) but is really just barely hanging in there before they get edged out by the corporate vultures' bargain basement prices you can't compete with anyway.
It's a shame to see old farms die off because the family that held it got greedy, or stupid, and sold out to the corporations for a buck. It's an equally big shame to see people not eating local and preferring to get their overpriced Smithfield ham instead of a ham for half the cost from Bob's Farm 45 minutes out.
edit on 11/15/2019 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Great post and very similar to how I grew up. We did not even lock our doors when we went on trips, so the neighbors could get in if they wanted. We would help each other and do things like irrigate and tend to gardens and orchards for each other or feed the animals when we took vacations. It was always reciprocal. As children we were neighborhood children and we knew as we played we could cross fences and move from property to property and the worst that would happen is someones mother bringing us out a treat or some lemon aid. The whole area was one giant yard we shared.

Right now I live on nice quiet street, no crime, no problems, but my neighbors are all city folks. When I first moved in I tried smiling and waving at neighbors to get to know them, but only one waved and smiled back in all the years I've been here. Other than one family they only talk to us when they want something from us. None of the neighbors interact with each other or know each other.

The kids never play outdoors. We only see them when they get in or out of a car to go somewhere. It's frankly weird living in an area with lots of kids, but you never see them playing outside. They all live in their little insulated worlds cut off from the community around them.



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: CynConcepts

Yep! Just like those delicious, heavenly hamburgers... that's not ribeye they're grinding up into burger.

TheRedneck


Hey, wait a minute! We ground up ribeye (tenderloin, sirloin, rib roast, flank, chuck, brisket and every other cut) into our burger from the animal we had processed a couple months back. Best burger you'll ever eat!

**whispering**...it's a good way to process older cows.




...and old dairy cows


(post by Ironclad1964 removed for political trolling and baiting)

posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

107 ft is where the pump is. 187ft total depth.

You could stick a pipe in the ground and get water here, were right on a million springs/aquifers.

Average depth is about 50-60 ft for most people in the area, I elected to go deeper.

And I saw the P.M.

Thankyou.



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: okrian

originally posted by: MisterSpock
a reply to: okrian

Haven't seen you around lately.........

It was kind of nice....




I'm even noticed? You are too kind. I enjoy the folks of ATS, no matter the affiliation.

In all truth, I have a split love of city and middle-of-nowhere. I feel lucky to have grown up camping, hiking, knowing the land and how to navigate it. I wouldn't trade that, or the beauty of it, for anything.

I know we are referencing the left of the city vs the right of the rural. But these worlds aren't so black and white. I say this as a vegan who is far to the left of the centrist democrats, who also works on old cars, loves me some old country music, and will smoke a cigarette at the end of the night on a porch looking out into the fireflies.

All this push for polarization... all the time. Ugh.


Thanks for letting everyone know that you think of yourself as vegan.
Very important to share that in every conversation.

But: ahhmmmm, this is kinda awkward...
Smoking cigarettes isn't considered vegan, so...




Testing the act of smoking on animals allowed the tobacco industry to hide the connection between smoking and cancer for decades since the tested beagles did not develop cancer. Although there was a clear link between smoking and cancer, doctors were encouraged to keep quiet and government was not willing to take on the tobacco companies and so the testing continued (and still does) and the public remained confused.


Source: The South African vegan directory




posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 03:03 PM
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Yeah: seems like the guy is a legit Berkeley PHD candidate, but, something smells fishy.

We have read here on ATS, that one of the tactics used by Ruskie trolls, is to post false twitter messages, then delete them.
The goal is to cause divisiveness, and discord in the good peoples.

Whether that tactic is being used here, or not: the end result seems the same.
Sad to see our good ATS rural members, getting pissed-off, at some idea, that may or may not be 'real'.

Looked into it a bit, and there does seem to be a profile of him there at Berkeley, but could we not wait a bit to see it this was a legit brain-fart, or some pro-trolling ?

Thanks and blessing to our farmers:



posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 03:35 PM
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Rural person here from the UK.
Get orff moi laaand.
As the opposing fans at Norwich football matches (its a Norfolk england thing) chant to the Addams Family thing:
" Your mother is your sister
Your father is your brother
Your all shagging eacthother
The norfolk family
De de dum etc."
Apologies.
Bit like your version of "Deliverance" i suppose.
Little legs dangling over bridge and banjo and stuff.
Apologies.
Its friday night here and i have had enough of our election nonesense.
Might watch Deliverance now.




posted on Nov, 15 2019 @ 03:49 PM
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I have driven through many different rural areas in different states and find that US farmers are very well off in that they live in modern mansion style houses. Houses that are usually suited for a multi millionaire. Seems to me they are living very well. So, what is the premise behind the title of this thread?
edit on 15-11-2019 by eManym because: (no reason given)



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