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My New 1280 Lbs Pull Force Magnet - Did I find a Leprachaun Pot ?

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posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

I tried this earlier on in the year in the UK on the river Nene. I found a moped and some some rusty nails.

Any advice on the best river locations? Like over bridges etc? I would like to get back into it.




posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: fatpastyhead

Sure, do some history research of the place. Battles, trade ports. Check how old is the bridge.



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

Very interesting!

My guess is the pot and the tools are unrelated. I think the tools are toys. I think the pot might be an old hearth pot. That might actually be worth some money depending on what it looks like when cleaned up.

I'd love to see some pictures of what it looks like after it's been cleaned



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

Definitely an antique smelting pot and associated tools.

I can't account for the small size, maybe for portability on a ship? Replacement parts during voyages?

I did find small vintage anvils that size where there original purpose was for jewelers?

Interesting find.



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 03:52 PM
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Tinker's tools??



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Maybe a naughty kid didn't have a case to take his toys to the river and took dad's smelting pot, then he dropped by accident.

- Where is my smelting pot ??!!!
- I don't know dad.




posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 03:57 PM
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Why would anyone throw a bunch of tools into the lake. Maybe the wife was mad at her husband so she tossed everything where he could not get it. They used to buy scrap metal even back in the eighteen hundreds.



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 04:05 PM
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originally posted by: Caractacus
a reply to: Trueman
Definitely an antique smelting pot and associated tools.
Interesting find.


That's the strongest theory we have now.



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 04:08 PM
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"Definitely an antique smelting pot and associated tools".

That's the strongest theory we have now. Just thought about another detectorist that knows about smelting. I'll ask him now.
edit on 10-11-2019 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: Trueman

originally posted by: Caractacus
a reply to: Trueman
Definitely an antique smelting pot and associated tools.
Interesting find.


That's the strongest theory we have now.


Google image search antique smelting pot. The legs are a give away, plus small anvil and hammer. It looks like a quickly fashioned "scoop" as well (That thing that looks like a spoon).



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 04:44 PM
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Due to the size, I think the anvil, axe, hammer, rake and shovel are part of a children’s toy tool set.
The cast iron pot is a cooking pot that had legs so that coals could be placed under it and rings for a bail so that it could be hung over a fire on a swing arm or a tripod.
Example[edit by]edit on b000000302019-11-10T16:46:18-06:0004America/ChicagoSun, 10 Nov 2019 16:46:18 -0600400000019 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: Nickn3
I knew if I kept looking long enough I would read the very idea that came to me from the op. A witches cauldron.
S&F



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 11:00 PM
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I doubt it's a smelting pot. A smelting pot would be much thicker, and it wouldn't be adorned like that. This was a pot for cooking over a hearth or open fire.

Smelting pots don't usually have ornamental rings around them, or any other cast feature, because those features would cause the pot to heat unevenly and break under the extreme temperatures required for smelting. Smelting pots are usually very uniform and smooth on the outside so they don't get hot spots or differential heating.

Also, smelting pots usually don't have feet like this one does. This pot was made for sitting over a fire, not "in" a fire or furnace. The legs elevate the pot above the coals. There was probably also a bail on the pot at one time so it could be suspended in a hearth.

Looks like a 19th century bean pot actually. Maybe 1850's-1860's or so. You might want to take it to an antique dealer and see what it is.



posted on Nov, 11 2019 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
I didn't think about the details but now that you mentioned it, I think you're right.

I still can't understand the connection between the pot and those strange artifacts found inside it.

edit on 11-11-2019 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2019 @ 01:40 AM
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It looks like the plastic price tag holder is still attached to the cauldron.

Cool finds.



posted on Nov, 11 2019 @ 02:25 AM
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a reply to: staple

Hahaha....yeah, I saw it when it came out from the water, but no plastic. Just a sort of algae or similar.



posted on Nov, 11 2019 @ 04:26 AM
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a reply to: Trueman

What's really great about your find is, it's all in one piece and doesn't appear to be broken.

How badly is it rusted? Is it rusted through anywhere? Hows the metal thickness? How much does it weigh?

I am more than just a little intrigued by your find! I'd be all over that thing trying to find out the 'what', 'when', 'who' and 'why'!

I hope you have it cleaned up and stabilized against further oxidation. You might actually be sitting on a pretty valuable artifact with this one! Certainly an artifact with some historical value, people just don't make pots like that anymore.

Just a side note, even old cast iron cookware can easily fetch several hundred dollars per piece, and not stuff anywhere near as old as your piece.



posted on Nov, 11 2019 @ 05:15 AM
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The start of your journey to figure out what it is will be to get the bottom of it cleaned up very carefully. Then from there you should be looking for a "sprue" mark, or mark from the manufacturer. It may not be letters, it may be a symbol. Next look for a long thin straight line, or "gate". It may look like a weld (but it isn't). If it has one, it will date back to the late 1700's through 1800's.

Can you post some pictures next to a ruler to get a better idea of the size? Looks like it might be about a Size #2 pot, which would hold about 1-1/4 gallons, but I can't tell for sure.

Here are some tips on restoration. However, before you do anything with your oven you may want to go down to the local hardware store and get a kit to test for lead. If the pot tests positive for lead you probably might want to keep it out of your oven. Lead melts at 600F, so nothing should happen in your oven, but better safe than sorry. Also, if you get a positive test for lead definitely wear gloves and a good dust mask or respirator for the following process.

1. Wash as much of the rust off as you can under warm water using a scrub brush. Really give it a good scrubbing. Dry thoroughly.

2. For this step you can use steel wool, but wadded up tin foil actually works better (and you might want a dust mask). Wad up some tin foil into a ball about the size of your fist. Start dry scrubbing the pot with the tinfoil. You'll notice it takes the rust off quick, but you've really got to scrub it. Remove as much rust as possible, both inside and outside. Periodically blow all the rust dust off of it so you can see what you're doing. An air compressor works great for this.

3. Wash the pot under warm water with a sponge and some light soap. Scrub with a brush where necessary. Rinse thoroughly until all the soap is removed. Then dry thoroughly.

4. Coat every surface of the rust free pot with generous coat of olive oil (not EVOO, but regular). Give it as much olive oil as it will take, several coats if necessary. Then turn the pot upside down and put it in your cold oven. Turn your oven on to 350 F and bake the pot in your oven for 1 hour (from a cold start). Note: you don't want to put your pot in a hot oven because it may crack, you want to heat the pot up with the oven as it heats up.

5. After one hour in the oven, turn the oven off, leave the door closed and allow the oven to cool all the way down before opening the door and removing the pot. This will take a while, maybe a couple hours. The pot should be cool to the touch before it is removed from the oven.

Your pot will now be stabilized against further rusting, and if you've done everything right it should be a beautiful black color.



posted on Nov, 11 2019 @ 06:19 AM
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a reply to: dashen

Yes, isn't it cute?
Is there a reason that they might think these things are related?
Some look like childrens beach toys from before the plastic pail and shovel era.



posted on Nov, 11 2019 @ 06:37 AM
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a reply to: Trueman

I think those are smetling tools , that little pot looks like its used for melting ores ?

just guessing , looks cool nice find



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