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Good resource for learning to preasure can?

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posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 02:34 PM
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So I got my pressure cooker/canner with the ambition of learning to pressure can but now I'm a bit nervous about it lol

Can someone explain how pressure canning works ? I'm going to do things like Bean soup , Chili ect .. Even meat if I can get it down but I'm confused because from what I'm understanding is you actually cook stuff in the canning process how do you know how long to cook and not over cook but still make sure its canned properly also if a item is already cooked like bean soup will the canning process over cook the soup Plus if you are cooking the item while canning how do you get the recipe down and can you pressure can something that already cooked ?
edit on 11/9/2019 by Gargoyle91 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

YouTube?



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

I think that it works by cooking your food under higher pressure which makes it cook faster.

I bought one while doing my weekly ball bearing and nail shopping. Everyone gave me strange looks. Pretty sure my phone was tapped after that as well.



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

I've only used canning for sanitation for growing mushrooms so my knowledge is limited to that, but you are basically putting whatever you are canning under a certain amount of pressure and temperature for so long depending on what your are canning.

After a certain temp, for a sustained amount of time, harmful bacteria cannot survive, so your end result is cooked food in a sterile environment. Any bad bacteria is dead and cannot promote decay in this environment, or at least it is slowed drastically, or until you pop the lid off.
edit on 9-11-2019 by TheLieWeLive because: ocd



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

If you can any pears be sure to throw in some red hots gives them some taste so to say.



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

Oh damn your asking us for info.

Youtube has tons of videos about canning. I learned to can from youtube.

I was hoping that you were some kind of expert and could explain how to can on a camp fire.
I learned to can not so I could can at home using my stove and special caners for meats and stuff.
Because yes there are 2 types of caners. One for meat, one for everything else.

So if anyone has ever used a caner on a camp fire to can ether veg or meat I would love to hear about it.
I got into canning so that I could preserve foods in a true shtf scenario. I'm living outside kind of event.

Canning inside with electricity and running water is easy.



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: scraedtosleep

Couldn't you use a Pressure canner heated by fire the same way or do you mean completely without resources? I would make sure my canner was part of my stash along with a few cases of ball jars I have what I call my Jeep bug out stuff in my garage I just pull up load up and I'm out .
edit on 11/9/2019 by Gargoyle91 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/9/2019 by Gargoyle91 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

The Ball book of canning and preserving.

Either buy the book or download and print the pdf.

It also covers smoking and preserving pretty well.




posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

Purchase a "Ball Blue Book". It has all the instructions on pressure canning and tons of recipes. You can buy the book on Amazon or at most hardware stores along with canning supplies.



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

pressure cooking needs to be the right temps for the right times.

And you would need the right container.

In a shtf scenario it would be hard to find the right containers and keeping a camp fire at a set temp for an extended amount of time.

I can't find any video of anyone trying to pressure cook in the wild.
Also when you pressure cook you have to sterilize your jars before using them.



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 06:48 PM
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originally posted by: scraedtosleep
a reply to: Gargoyle91

pressure cooking needs to be the right temps for the right times.

And you would need the right container.

In a shtf scenario it would be hard to find the right containers and keeping a camp fire at a set temp for an extended amount of time.

I can't find any video of anyone trying to pressure cook in the wild.
Also when you pressure cook you have to sterilize your jars before using them.


10 tips for canning over a wood fire

To can outdoors it is easier to just use a camp fire and a cooking fire.

You feed your cooking fire from the campfire to keep a more stable temperature.




posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 07:15 PM
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You don't have to pressure everything for it to be well preserved. Hot bathing works on a lot of vegetables. I make salsa every year and only use hot bathing. The water has to be 2 inches above the tops of the jars and the water has to boil for a set time. For salsa, it is 15 to 20 minutes. I've also done corn this way. Its been a while but I believe it had to boil for over an hour. Note that this will also create pressure inside the jars. Make sure your lids are on tight and seat well or they will blow off during the boil. Yes it took awhile to clean up all that salsa on the stove!



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: TXTriker
You don't have to pressure everything for it to be well preserved. Hot bathing works on a lot of vegetables. I make salsa every year and only use hot bathing. The water has to be 2 inches above the tops of the jars and the water has to boil for a set time. For salsa, it is 15 to 20 minutes. I've also done corn this way. Its been a while but I believe it had to boil for over an hour. Note that this will also create pressure inside the jars. Make sure your lids are on tight and seat well or they will blow off during the boil. Yes it took awhile to clean up all that salsa on the stove!


The rings holding the lids need to be finger tight only.

Because when you are canning either way (hot bath or pressure) the air in the headspace and the food itself needs to be able to escape.

Then when it cools, the lid itself seals.

Lids that are on too tight will either cause the lid to buckle or the jar to explode... if it doesn't do either then what you have just canned will not seal properly.

When you are done canning and you get the satisfying "pop POP pop" when the lids seal, you don't need the rings on the jars anymore.

You can take them off and store them till next time.



And ETA, if you are unsure what "finger tight" is, buy a Sure Tight Band Tool.

Youtube linky for demonstration of Sure Tight


edit on 9-11-2019 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: Gargoyle91
So I got my pressure cooker/canner with the ambition of learning to pressure can but now I'm a bit nervous about it lol

Can someone explain how pressure canning works ? I'm going to do things like Bean soup , Chili ect .. Even meat if I can get it down but I'm confused because from what I'm understanding is you actually cook stuff in the canning process how do you know how long to cook and not over cook but still make sure its canned properly also if a item is already cooked like bean soup will the canning process over cook the soup Plus if you are cooking the item while canning how do you get the recipe down and can you pressure can something that already cooked ?


Howdy. Good topic. I'd like to know how's it different from our g-parents using just mason jars!?



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

Check the seals. That's the biggy.

And do a lot of online research for pressures, times, etc.

Big deal is REALLY CLEAN jars and fresh seals and bands.

But again - there's so much information online - you should be all set checking out YT.

Good luck...

I'm trying my hand and canned meat this year.



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 08:33 PM
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Good for you learning to can. Botulism throws me off somewhat, it's scary, I'm learning too. Oh well, if done right, you won't have this problem.

I've been watching this youtuber for a while now, off-grid, woman of God and a conspiracy and health nut too.

Here's a list of canning videos. You will learn a lot about it. Bath canning, pressure canning and butter canning.

Starry Hilder Canning



Enjoy!



posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 08:55 PM
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originally posted by: mysterioustranger

originally posted by: Gargoyle91
So I got my pressure cooker/canner with the ambition of learning to pressure can but now I'm a bit nervous about it lol

Can someone explain how pressure canning works ? I'm going to do things like Bean soup , Chili ect .. Even meat if I can get it down but I'm confused because from what I'm understanding is you actually cook stuff in the canning process how do you know how long to cook and not over cook but still make sure its canned properly also if a item is already cooked like bean soup will the canning process over cook the soup Plus if you are cooking the item while canning how do you get the recipe down and can you pressure can something that already cooked ?


Howdy. Good topic. I'd like to know how's it different from our g-parents using just mason jars!?


It isn't different at all.


A Mason jar, named after John Landis Mason who first invented and patented it in 1858, is a molded glass jar used in home canning to preserve food. The jar's mouth has a screw thread on its outer perimeter to accept a metal ring. The band, when screwed down, presses a separate stamped tin-plated steel disc-shaped lid against the jar's rim. An integral rubber ring on the underside of the lid creates a hermetic seal. The bands and lids usually come with new jars, but they are also sold separately.


Ball started making mason jars in the 1880's.

So a Ball jar is a mason jar.




posted on Nov, 9 2019 @ 09:04 PM
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I can extensively.

The key is, at sea level, the hottest you can get something by boiling it is 212F (100C).

You can get the burner hotter than that, but the excess heat just boils away in the steam.

Put a lid on it, like a pressure cooker, and you can use that heat.

You may remember a relationship, the "Magic Triangle" from high school chemistry or physics. Pressure, Temperature and Volume are all related. You can increase one of the others if you must limit one aspect of the three. So, since you cannot produce a temperature above boiling, you instead manipulate the volume or the pressure.

I can a lot of stuff.

In my experience, if something DOES go bad (which is really, really rare), you know instantly when you take the lid off.

I have friends who can chicken for a decade of storage, and you cannot tell it's that old.

My choice for canning has been fruit (jams and jellies), then vegetables. But I'm getting more and more into the meat canning business.

I know the liquid in the packed jar makes it too heavy to travel with. But for bunkering down, it is the cheapest option available.



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: Lumenari

This I knew...Ball/Mason jars grandma's used.! But, never understood why/what are...that you'd "put up" .. cumquats!?*

*I know what they are just...why?😁 Thank you Lumenari...have a great day



posted on Nov, 10 2019 @ 09:09 AM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

Buy a copy of the Ball canning book and look up Katzcradul on
you tube,she's one of the best online canners.




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