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11,300 year old temple found in Mardin Turkey

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posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:06 PM
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It looks like a fourth cousin to Gobekli Tepe is being unearthed. Again, in the area of SE Turkey.

I couldn't find additional reports or stories. The article say that they found four steles and have not yet reached the base. I would be thrilled if they unearthed artifacts that could illuminate the era, people, or the Gobekli site.

This is pretty exciting news to me.

Daily Sabah

Hurriyet Daily




The archaeological excavation project, initiated by the Mardin Museum Directorate in 2012 within the scope of “Studies for the Documentation and Rescue of Cultural Assets Remaining in the Interaction Area of the Ilısu Dam and HES Project” in rural Ilısu neighborhood, continues.




The temple from the same period of Göbeklitepe was unearthed in the field, where a Neolithic period structure with rubble stones and hardened clay floors was also unearthed,.
“According to analysis, the temple has four steles. We think it’s about 11,300 years old. Excavations are underway, but we have clearly revealed the steles. One of the four steles we uncovered was broken, but the other three were still preserved to this day as they were,” Kodaş said.








posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:07 PM
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a reply to: LedermanStudio

Got to have been some kind of builder/technologically superior race that predates history.

But can we handle that?



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:26 PM
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Stele


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



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This article is about the stone monuments. For other uses, see Stele (disambiguation).

"Stela" redirects here. For other uses, see Stela (disambiguation).

"Stelae" redirects here. For the town of ancient Crete, see Stelae (Crete).

"Stelai" redirects here. For the battle, see Battle of Stelai.

"Stone tablet" redirects here. For the Ten Commandments stone tablet, see Tablets of Stone.





Stele N from Copán, Honduras, depicting King K'ac Yipyaj Chan K'awiil ("Smoke Shell"), as drawn by Frederick Catherwood in 1839




Stele to the French 8th Infantry Regiment. One of more than half a dozen steles located on the Waterloo battlefield.
A stele (/ˈstiːli/ STEE-lee)[Note 1], or occasionally stela (plural stelas or stelæ), when derived from Latin, is a stone or wooden slab, generally taller than it is wide, erected in the ancient world as a monument. Grave stelae were often used for funerary or commemorative purposes. Stelae as slabs of stone would also be used as ancient Greek and Roman government notices or as boundary markers to mark borders or property lines.

The surface of the stele usually has text, ornamentation, or both. The ornamentation may be inscribed, carved in relief, or painted.

Steles are occasionally erected as memorials to battles. For example, along with other memorials, there are more than half-a-dozen steles erected on the battlefield of Waterloo at the locations of notable actions by participants in battle.[1]

Traditional Western gravestones may technically be considered the modern equivalent of ancient stelae, though the term is very rarely applied in this way. Equally, stele-like forms in non-Western cultures may be called by other terms, and the words "stele" and "stelae" are most consistently applied in archaeological contexts to objects from Europe, the ancient Near East and Egypt,[2] China, and sometimes Pre-Columbian America.



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:35 PM
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Just a dumb person's guess here, but I've always thought that they should be digging up that whole area- all those miles of plains with nothing but dirt hills on them, with stuff obviously underneath. Same in Egypt. They should just start shoving sand aside out there until they hit more tombs and temples. And whatever else!



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:38 PM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: LedermanStudio

Got to have been some kind of builder/technologically superior race that predates history.

But can we handle that?


We could, but rubble walls and some rectangular stones shoved into the ground don't seem that technologically advanced to me...



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

Did not say technologically superior to us in this day of age.

Our ancestors through, or what we assume to be our ancestors, might have known a thing or two that we are still yet to fathom about moving stones around, and big ones at that.



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:42 PM
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Some of the techniques they used are far more advanced than we use today. Moving giant stones weighing tons that fit tightly together without any milling machines, cranes and the like? Yeah, they definitely had us beat back then in some areas.



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:44 PM
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originally posted by: KansasGirl
Just a dumb person's guess here, but I've always thought that they should be digging up that whole area- all those miles of plains with nothing but dirt hills on them, with stuff obviously underneath. Same in Egypt. They should just start shoving sand aside out there until they hit more tombs and temples. And whatever else!


Should we do the same in our part of the world to expose the Inca and Aztec ruins that we don't know about? Napalm should do the trick nicely.



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: HalWesten

Nice to find out what's inside the likes of say the first emperor's tomb through or whats under the Giza Plateau.

The use of say LIDAR and other remote sensing methods such as ground-penetrating radar are a lot less intrusive than Napalm all the same.

Plus the technologies are only getting better.

edit on 31-10-2019 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:53 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Fair enough



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 09:56 PM
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originally posted by: HalWesten

originally posted by: KansasGirl
Just a dumb person's guess here, but I've always thought that they should be digging up that whole area- all those miles of plains with nothing but dirt hills on them, with stuff obviously underneath. Same in Egypt. They should just start shoving sand aside out there until they hit more tombs and temples. And whatever else!


Should we do the same in our part of the world to expose the Inca and Aztec ruins that we don't know about? Napalm should do the trick nicely.


It would be cool to know what's under there too, yes. Probably not as old though as all that stuff over in Turkey and Mesopotamia and Egypt though.

What's with the Napalm comment? You seem bitter.
edit on 31-10-2019 by KansasGirl because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 10:00 PM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: HalWesten

Nice to find out what's inside the likes of say the first emperor's tomb through or whats under the Giza Plateau.

The use of say LIDAR and other remote sensing methods such as ground-penetrating radar are a lot less intrusive than Napalm all the same.

Plus the technologies are only getting better.


I agree, but it takes some of the fun out of it.


Actually I would love to see what's under all of that foliage. And that sand. Centuries of growth and covering by nature along with layers upon layers of civilization fascinates me. We know from history that things are there but we can't see them. That makes me want to see them all the more.


What's with the Napalm comment? You seem bitter.


Bitter? Nah, just tired and punchy.
edit on 31-10-2019 by HalWesten because: (no reason given)

edit on 31-10-2019 by HalWesten because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: LedermanStudio

Turkey seems to be hoarding ancient sites like this. Before everything is
said and done, all will be revealed.


edit on 31-10-2019 by carsforkids because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

Its what off the coast the likes of Turkey, Egypt, and India that will be of interest.

Given that we build most of our civilizations on shorelines and flood plains, and the fact that sea levels rise and fall as the epochs go by, one can only wonder whats ancient remains are yet to be detected just a few 100 meters down and a mile or so out to sea?

As to Napalm, you can make it from petrol and styrofoam, but the ancients were better at that, with the likes of "Greek Fire" which we still cannot fathom the entire process of how they made the stuff.
edit on 31-10-2019 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 10:31 PM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: LedermanStudio

Got to have been some kind of builder/technologically superior race that predates history.

But can we handle that?


Sure were builder races around forever.

Superior is a broad term, especially regarding technology.

Rock walls, erected rocks vs probes orbiting Saturn and beyond, an electric car orbiting our planet.

One is far more superior in technology. Both definitely were builders.

Could be civilized intelligence beyond our current development in our galaxy alone.

Definitely impressive what man is capable of throughout the ages though

edit on 31-10-2019 by Elementalist because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: LedermanStudio
Cool discovery.
But, am I the only one who wonders why they are so sure these kinds of finds are necessarily temples? It could be a marketplace or a town hangout. Why is it always a place of worship?



posted on Oct, 31 2019 @ 11:30 PM
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originally posted by: KansasGirl

originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: LedermanStudio

Got to have been some kind of builder/technologically superior race that predates history.

But can we handle that?


We could, but rubble walls and some rectangular stones shoved into the ground don't seem that technologically advanced to me...


The rubble walls lasted eleven thousand years, foundations around here and stone buildings fall apart within two hundred years. I think our technology may operate backwards.



posted on Nov, 1 2019 @ 12:08 AM
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originally posted by: new_here
a reply to: LedermanStudio
Cool discovery.
But, am I the only one who wonders why they are so sure these kinds of finds are necessarily temples? It could be a marketplace or a town hangout. Why is it always a place of worship?


Yeah. I think sometimes that archaeologists, etc, just get into the guild and they all agree to buy into the same theories while never admitting they really don't know.



posted on Nov, 1 2019 @ 12:11 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: KansasGirl

originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: LedermanStudio

Got to have been some kind of builder/technologically superior race that predates history.

But can we handle that?


We could, but rubble walls and some rectangular stones shoved into the ground don't seem that technologically advanced to me...


The rubble walls lasted eleven thousand years, foundations around here and stone buildings fall apart within two hundred years. I think our technology may operate backwards.


Good point.

And we do know that as far as our "tech" today, they intentionally build it to break down. What would Apple do if people didn't have to keep buying new iphones? or even replacing the sh!t screens that break if you look at them too hard?



posted on Nov, 1 2019 @ 02:10 AM
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originally posted by: KansasGirl
Just a dumb person's guess here, but I've always thought that they should be digging up that whole area- all those miles of plains with nothing but dirt hills on them, with stuff obviously underneath. Same in Egypt. They should just start shoving sand aside out there until they hit more tombs and temples. And whatever else!


I guess I'm a dumb butt too, how did all these sites get filled in were they part of the preflood era?



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