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Navy audit finds $126M in parts

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posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 11:49 AM
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If you think logistics in the military is cutting edge or even modern you'll be let down. When I was in the Navy as a FC I was the RPPO/WCS for me division. Working with LSs was a nightmare. I had to get in with them so I was allowed to get in and physically look through racks for parts that the system said wasn't there.

So either the system would say it wasn't there and it would be, or the system would say that it was there, but it really wouldn't be.

Made for a great time when your chief, DIVO, and even CO are coming down on you for a CIWS mount being down asking why the part/s haven't come in.

Like sorry sir, all I can do is put in the request. You'll get more information from FCC or LT so and so and ask them why they haven't approved it.

edit on 29-10-2019 by AutomateThis1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: Identified

Yeah they do, but this is "hold my beer" level of bad management. I've seen some pretty bad screw ups by the military, but losing an entire warehouse and parts is a new one for me.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Have you ever seen a hundreds of thousands of dollars in parts fall into the ocean? I have.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

Personally, no, but yes I've heard about things like that happening.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 12:37 PM
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They discovered this last year.

How long had the parts been there? Months? Years?
How long had the unknown warehouse existed?

When was the last time an audit had been done of this nature? Years? Never?



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: queenofswords

Considering they said there were F-14 parts in it, and the last F-14 flew in 2006, at least 13 years.

This is the second year they've done a full audit. In addition to this facility they found $26M in parts for the E-2 and F-18 in San Diego, $53M in missile motors in Utah listed as bad that weren't, UH-60 blades listed as good that weren't, fuel injectors that had no paperwork, so no one even knew who owned them, facilities that were demolished that were still showing active....



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 01:27 PM
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Wonder if this has something to do with the new contract with MS and people are starting to look at what they have and where it is to save on importing in duff data.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: Maxatoria

It's definitely playing a huge role in trying to consolidate things. They're saying it's going to take several years of auditing to account for everything.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 01:43 PM
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I think people/businesses, etc - - are only accountable when they are held accountable.

Otherwise - - why bother.

Imagine if the military was actually held accountable for their spending.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:05 PM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1
a reply to: Zaphod58

Have you ever seen a hundreds of thousands of dollars in parts fall into the ocean? I have.


I can neither confirm nor deny.........

I do know that I had a brand new Ready Room reclining chair in my apartment at one time.

1985 I was TAD to Supply because I had hurt my ankle and couldn't work the Flight Deck. We were inventorying some of the Supply spaces and found parts for A-4's, F-8's, A-1's and S-2 Trackers. The funny thing was that the ship was just out of the yards from a four year overhaul.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:16 PM
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This thread, in a few posts, explains the myth of the $200 hammer and with it half the conspiracies that follow.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Zaphod58

It's all right there on that 5" floppy.
No problem.


they are 5.25 or 5 and 1/4". I may still have a system that can use them, if you need data. I even have a 3.5 in USB.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:18 PM
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I remember a readiness Chief, long ago who knew so much about the avionics on P3 aircraft, that when required to procure and requisition certain instruments, he would purposely over-order because he knew so much about failure rates and how hard it was to get certain items.

When the parts arrived, he would ferret the excess away in buildings all over the base and keep a mental note of where they were. Sure enough, when parts dried up and the Squadron was in a pinch, he was the go-to guy that kept the birds in the air and everything running smoothly.

The squadron never ran the same after he retired.

When the base closed in the late 90's, I can just imagine all of the stuff he hid away surfacing and no one could probably figure out where the hell it all came from.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: Phage

No idea. It was the first and last time I ever got involved in it. I was just low-rank muscle for the clipboards.

I heard stories though, of mechanics burying tool chests out in the field so the could order new ones. I am pretty sure that is unspoken SOP because in one field exercise we were digging fox holes and came across some equipment that was obviously buried that looked like parts to the old jeeps.


As a flightline guy, we had a different way with tools. I remember after putting down a floor panel on a 130, (think 500 screws, by hand) I went to turn in my tool box and a socket was missing. I can't go home without turning in the tools, and I can't turn in the tools without all of them present. So I had to go pull that panel, find my socket, and put it back down. That is how you learn to track your tools.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: network dude

I ran the night shift line crew. We usually worked Sunday thru Thursday. One Thursday night we had just finished our Daily and Turnaround inspections and were getting ready to leave when we noticed that we were missing a "stubby" screwdriver. We started going through the helos looking for it. We were still there when day shift came in. About 8:00 AM one of our junior pilots comes in and he has the screwdriver. He borrowed it to fix something on his car and stuck it in his pocket and forgot about it until he got home. The CO, XO, Maintenance Officer and Maintenance Master Chief all took a piece of his a$$.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

I would have killed him. No ifs ands or buts about it.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:45 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

There used to be guys running around with $50,000 in parts in scrounge bags. They would do the same thing, only they'd carry them with them, because they'd travel with the aircraft. It was always really oddball crap, that was ridiculously expensive too.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

SNAFU+FUBAR=MILLITARY



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I remember the "scrounge" bags. Senior techs knew what was important and hard to come by. It was interesting learning the right way, and then the "right" way. Results not excuses.



posted on Oct, 29 2019 @ 04:17 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: charlyv

There used to be guys running around with $50,000 in parts in scrounge bags. They would do the same thing, only they'd carry them with them, because they'd travel with the aircraft. It was always really oddball crap, that was ridiculously expensive too.


Hear that. Oddly enough, they probably save the military a magnitude more in money and readiness. Very expensive having a bird grounded due to the unavailability of an oddball part, especially on a deployment.
edit on 29-10-2019 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught




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