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Celery storage??

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posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 06:27 PM
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Anyone know of a way to keep celery long term? Celery is such a vital ingredient in so many dishes, but you usually don't need a lot. So, while we usually have celery in the fridge, it usually winds up looking like a wilted noodle.

Can you blanch it and freeze it?

It's such a fresh flavor, I don't think you'd want to can it in vinegar.

I know you can freeze dry it, but it's totally not the same.

Any ideas appreciated.




posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 06:38 PM
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I think if you wrap an moist paper towel around it, keep in in a large zip lock with the air removed it stays fresh longer. I dry celery in my dehydrator for soups etc. You can also grow some in your garden . I did this year



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 06:41 PM
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Always check the root end when you but it, Get the lightest colored end, even if you have to dig it out from behind the pile. Brown ends have been on the shelf longer



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 06:46 PM
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It must be hard to live in your house without gaining weight. LOL



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

What do you do with it after you dehydrate it?

Do you Vac seal and freeze it, or what?

And what's the consistency when you re-hydrate it (in a soup or whatever)?



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I freeze dry most of our crop, then reconstitute. It keeps all of the flavour for things youd use it as mire pois, etc.

Not so great in a stir fry, but weirdly perfect in stuffing.

Also, I keep a few standing in water for fresh cooking and crunching on. They'll grow forever, but are a little bland.



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 06:58 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: visitedbythem

What do you do with it after you dehydrate it?

Do you Vac seal and freeze it, or what?

And what's the consistency when you re-hydrate it (in a soup or whatever)?


I put it in Mason jars on the kitchen counter for use in soups. It has to simmer a bit or it will be crunchy



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
I cut it into sticks straight away and store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
Celery lasts a lot longer that way.
Although it generally gets eaten pretty fast in my house anyway. Often with peanut butter spread into the concave. Mmmmmmmm.



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 07:07 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Anyone know of a way to keep celery long term? Celery is such a vital ingredient in so many dishes, but you usually don't need a lot. So, while we usually have celery in the fridge, it usually winds up looking like a wilted noodle.

Can you blanch it and freeze it?

It's such a fresh flavor, I don't think you'd want to can it in vinegar.

I know you can freeze dry it, but it's totally not the same.

Any ideas appreciated.


In a root cellar in wet sand.

Before I had a (mostly) year-round greenhouse, it would last through the winter for me.



edit on 25-10-2019 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Okay, now I'm really confused!!!

Can you explain a 'root cellar' in Montana to me?? (Wyo native asking here).

What, is it 100' feet deep covered by 189 layers of R-950 insulation, and a small thermo-nuclear energy source inside?

Where I came from, a root cellar would be down near the mantle of the Earth inside a volcanic fissure...and it would still freeze!



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I chop mine up, throw it in a freezer bag and toss it in my freezer so when I need some I just take out what I need and zip it back up. I do the same with onion, green onion and bell pepper. No need for blanching- you can freeze them raw.



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: Lumenari

Okay, now I'm really confused!!!

Can you explain a 'root cellar' in Montana to me?? (Wyo native asking here).

What, is it 100' feet deep covered by 189 layers of R-950 insulation, and a small thermo-nuclear energy source inside?

Where I came from, a root cellar would be down near the mantle of the Earth inside a volcanic fissure...and it would still freeze!





I live on the Clark Fork river in western Montana... my growing zone is either a 5b or 6 depending on which service you use.

My root cellar is in my basement.

Sorry I answered your question as it would seem to have little use to you.

I'll let myself out of the thread now.




posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari


It was was a joke, silly! Your responses are always valuable to me.

Gosh, does no one have a sense of humor anymore? I actually thought you'd think it funny. (Granted, I may have a twisted sense of humor).

I should have added...what temperature? (i.e. what is the max temp?) Would high 50's to low 60's be okay?

If so, our basement would work.

edit on 10/25/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 07:45 PM
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I usually go through the whole stalk of celery before it goes bad. Occasionally I do have to throw a little bit out, but only about once a year or more. Considering I buy celery about every two weeks, I have little waste. I do not eat it raw, it goes into soups and stews and is used in stuffings and when I roast a chicken. The organic celery tastes a lot better than the commercial stuff, but is about one and a half times the price except when all celery is high, then the organic is just a little more.

Sorry I cannot help you with the problem you are having with storing it, I do not know the answer because I use it quite a bit. My daughter asked me what I do too, I told her I never have it go bad, after all, I usually bring the two daughters a big pot of soup at least once every other week.



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 08:04 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Anyone know of a way to keep celery long term? Celery is such a vital ingredient in so many dishes, but you usually don't need a lot. So, while we usually have celery in the fridge, it usually winds up looking like a wilted noodle.

Can you blanch it and freeze it?

It's such a fresh flavor, I don't think you'd want to can it in vinegar.

I know you can freeze dry it, but it's totally not the same.

Any ideas appreciated.


'Plunge the cut celery into the hot water for three minutes, then chill it in the bowl of ice water. After blanching and cooling, you will want to pat the celery dry before you place it in the freezer for flash freezing.'

www.thespruceeats.com...

Er, nobody said could it be simple...but, you can't really store burgers like that any which way for so long. You could try foil though.
edit on 25-10-2019 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 08:10 PM
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One of the hacks I picked up from somewhere o the internet was to wrap it in tin foil when you first put it in the fridge.
Of course I thought it was ridiculous. Till I tried it.

Damned if it didn't work!
Kept it fresh an crunchy for about a month-5 weeks!

For your purposes Lumenari was referencing the older methods of long term veggie storage. Like they used in the early 1800's. She gave you enough info for a decent google search.
Good Luck!!!



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I've always done the basic chop & freeze method, when needed. Works for celery, leeks, bell peppers, onions and similar for me.

If I think I'm going to use it in short order, I store it in the (**very cold) fridge with the cut end in a container of water. I have a head of romaine in the fridge right not staying crisp that way, so it does work. BUT it's a short-term solution, because once it starts to regrow, it's bland, and the new parts, if they sprout, don't have much in the way of nutrition to it.

** I keep the fridge just a hair over frost-friendly temp. It keeps fresh things edible longer for us that way. Just have to keep an eye on it in the winter, I've had frozen heads of lettuces in the crisper drawers that way, that's a surefire way to render them wilted and gross.



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 09:00 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: Lumenari


It was was a joke, silly! Your responses are always valuable to me.

Gosh, does no one have a sense of humor anymore? I actually thought you'd think it funny. (Granted, I may have a twisted sense of humor).

I should have added...what temperature? (i.e. what is the max temp?) Would high 50's to low 60's be okay?

If so, our basement would work.


My apologies... rough week for me on ATS and I'm a little thin-skinned.

Root cellars are usually just to store things like fruit and tubers for the winter.

There is a 1970's one here on the property that was used for exactly that by the former owner.

When we built the new house I put a root cellar in the basement that by itself is about 52 degrees all the time.

With ventilation, some fans and a thermostat I keep it at about 38 degrees in the winter... I just bring in the outside cold air.

It doesn't need to be that cold in the summer because I'm not storing anything there but apples and potatoes till fall (keep them separate!!!).

A lot of a perfect root cellar has to do with humidity... it needs to stay high.

So it's a lot better then a refrigerator.

I obviously didn't build it just for celery, but it works very well for most veggies.




edit on 25-10-2019 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

While not a storage method, an alternative that is almost as good would be celery seed and a mortar and pestle to grind it up. I use it fairly often in several dishes and even then keeping celery on hand is hard to do.



posted on Oct, 25 2019 @ 10:39 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Wrap the celery tightly in aluminum foil. The heavy duty foil, not the cheap Walmart crap. Celery often goes bad rapidly because it releases ethylene, a ripening hormone. Not sure what you have in mind for long term but this method should last 3-4 weeks in the frig.




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