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Irene mccammon scotts book "ufos today, 70 years of lies misinformation etc"

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posted on Oct, 24 2019 @ 01:44 AM
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So recently i got this book by her,and have a couple of questions that the ats search engine dosent help with. Cant say im familiar with her at all

First of all who is she



Irena (McCammon) Scott is an American author and physiologist. She received a BS from Ohio State University, an MS from the University of Nevada, and a PhD from the University of Missouri in the Department of Veterinary Medicine. Her post-doctoral studies were done at Cornell University.

She has been employed as an Assistant Professor (Department of Biology) at St. Bonaventure University, and has done research and teaching at the Ohio State University, the University of Missouri, the University of Nevada, and at Battelle Memorial Institute.[1] She worked in related fields and for many years studied many species including bonobos and their behaviour.[2] She was a correspondent for Popular Mechanics magazine.[2] Scott has also worked as a volunteer astronomer at the Ohio State University Radio Observatory, as well as participated in UFO investigations for Defense Intelligence Agency and Center for UFO Studies.[3] She is the author of six books, including on UFOs,[4] and has contributed chapters and articles to several scientific journals, magazines, and newspapers. Her listings include Who's Who in the World, World Who's Who of Women, Who's Who in the Midwest, Dictionary of International Biography, and Who's Who in Frontier Science and Technology.[1]

Her 2008 book, Uncle: My Journey with John Purdue, is a biography of John Purdue, founder of Purdue University and of the Purdue Block in Lafayette, Indiana.[5][6][7] The foreword is by William Allen, author of Starkweather: Inside the Mind of a Teenage Killer, Aransas: The Life of a Texas Coastal County. The book is the first of the Founders Series, published by the Purdue University Press.




From her book i got this for Kenneth arnold,




My research showed that although most UFOlogists view Arnold’s sighting as the event that precipitated UFO study, the government actually might have begun to study the phenomena as early as January 1947. This claim is supported by a government document given to me by Dr. Bruce Ashcroft, who was then the official base historian at WPAFB, titled “Technical Report No. F-TR-2274-IA Unidentified Aerial Objects Project ‘Sign’ AMC Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (B1 UFO 1947).” This document describes the Arnold sighting and includes additional sighting information dating back to January 1947. In addition, the book Arnold co-wrote with Raymond Palmer, The Coming of the Saucers, reports that the government had been investigating discs for six months before Arnold’s sighting.



I have to say i didnt know this. Is this true? If yes how-when-where-why.If this is indeed true then they dont take into account the Battle of LA . Maybe she meant 6 years? in 1940 we had foo fighters in WW2


My second question is with regards to the Coyne mansfield case we got a thread here and here . She writes in her book




A strange government interest in this is shown by the fact that three weeks after the event Coyne received a call from a man who identified himself as being from the Office of the Surgeon General of the US Army Medical Department. This caller asked if Coyne or other crewmembers had had any unusual dreams since the UFO experience. Coyne had had two.

In one, he was outside his body. In the second, he was holding a bluish white sphere in his hand and he heard a voice say, “The answer is in the circle.”

Coyne said that every two months he was telephoned and asked a series of questions about whether certain things had happened to him or if he had dreamed of them since his UFO experience. He was told to question the rest of the crew as well and to mail their answers to the Pentagon.

Crewmember Healey said the Pentagon contacted him with similar questions; in particular, he was asked if he ever dreamed of body separation. He had. He was also asked if he had dreamed of anything with a spherical shape. He hadn’t.





In his 1991 book, The Watchers: The Secret Design behind UFO Abduction, author Ray Fowler says the CIA has an interest in extra-sensory perception (ESP). He thinks the agency is investigating whether a link exists between UFOs and ESP and whether UFO witnesses might have ESP abilities.

Fowler thinks the questions asked of the helicopter crew were based on investigations of abductions within the ranks of the military and NASA. He asserts that this crack in government secrecy lends credibility to abduction cases. The Coyne event was not thought to involve abduction, but perhaps the government felt that because a green light was shined on the witnesses the incident was abduction-like. Or perhaps the helicopter’s inexplicable climb suggested abduction.



I have to say i didnt know this aspect of the coyne mansfield case either. Can anyone confirm this?


I read here and there that there might be a secret book ala mj12 somewhere studying the phenomenon and while many researchers claim this no evidence has ever been presented except from hearsay. Irenes scott is no different in that regard. And if indeed the above 2 excerpts are any indication it seems highly possible that there is a secret group somewhere that knows





posted on Oct, 24 2019 @ 06:52 AM
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originally posted by: IMSAM





A strange government interest in this is shown by the fact that three weeks after the event Coyne received a call from a man who identified himself as being from the Office of the Surgeon General of the US Army Medical Department. This caller asked if Coyne or other crewmembers had had any unusual dreams since the UFO experience. Coyne had had two.

In one, he was outside his body. In the second, he was holding a bluish white sphere in his hand and he heard a voice say, “The answer is in the circle.”

Coyne said that every two months he was telephoned and asked a series of questions about whether certain things had happened to him or if he had dreamed of them since his UFO experience. He was told to question the rest of the crew as well and to mail their answers to the Pentagon.

Crewmember Healey said the Pentagon contacted him with similar questions; in particular, he was asked if he ever dreamed of body separation. He had. He was also asked if he had dreamed of anything with a spherical shape. He hadn’t.




:

Wow!, Sounds to me like evidence of the early rk'er activities and investigations that would lead to A####'s "breakaway civilization's" eventual breakaway!
edit on 24-10-2019 by Osirisvset because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2019 @ 07:55 AM
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a reply to: IMSAM

The Battle of LA (1942) was never considered a UFO case until the late 1980s. You won't find it in any of the UFO literature before then. What everyone thinks of as the famous UFO picture is actually enhanced to show up on cheap quality newsprint paper.



The original negative was found a few years ago.



There could be something there of course. It's just not as impressive as the version with the contrast whacked up for the newspaper. But the origins of the story are suspicious because they come directly from what most consider to be fraudulent documents. The MJ-12 papers to be exact. The Battle of LA specifically relating to this....



This Headquarters has come to a determination that the mystery airplanes are in fact not earthly and according to secret intelligence sources they are in all probability of interplanetary origin......

www.majesticdocuments.com...


The official verdict of the Battle of LA is contained in the’ The Army Air Forces in World War II report’. Basically war jitters caused by weather balloons. Before you scoff you have to remember that the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor just a few months prior and the mindset was one of fear from a foreign attack.




....A careful study of the evidence suggests that meteorological balloons — known to have been released over Los Angeles — may well have caused the initial alarm.....

This theory is supported by the fact that anti-aircraft artillery units were officially criticized for having wasted ammunition on targets which moved too slowly to have been airplanes.

After the firing started, careful observation was difficult because of drifting smoke from shell bursts. The acting commander of the anti-aircraft artillery brigade in the area testified that he had first been convinced that he had seen fifteen planes in the air, but had quickly decided that he was seeing smoke. Competent correspondents like Ernie Pyle and Bill Henry witnessed the shooting and wrote that they were never able to make out an airplane.

See Page 285 & 286



Even after the war the mindset was very much one of fear of what the Soviet Union was up to in the post war era. Ghost Rockets were reported over Scandinavia in 1946. The US military were also involved in investigations with Operation Charlie in Jan 1947 when a mysterious craft seemed to be evading British Air defences. There were reports of flying discs through the spring of 1947 across Europe and Project Grudge documents a case from April 1947 over Virginia. Other cases exist before Arnold's case.

But even when Arnold's sighting and then Roswell happened the mindset was not of spaceships from other planets. Flying Discs or Saucers were very much suspected to be secret Soviet technology. So the military would be investigating anything in the skies with that in mind.



posted on Oct, 24 2019 @ 01:25 PM
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The Arnold sighting was never touted as the start of UFO investigations. It is famous for the naming of UFOs as "flying saucers".



posted on Oct, 24 2019 @ 01:46 PM
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There's no doubt that the UFO field in general still tends to downplay any kind of high strangeness when looking at the reports. Time "bending," psychic communication, etc. It's gotten a little better, but who knows how much potentially valuable information was lost over the years by investigators or advocates (looking at you RIP Stan Friedman) who only wanted to know about the nuts and bolts, and likely just didn't know what to do with witnesses and their odd dreams or telepathic messages.

I suppose it's not surprising. We know more about our machines than we do about our own minds, and exploration into those fields tends to make you cross paths with a huge number of kooks and weirdos who generally tend to be no help at all.

But if we could figure it out, that's probably where the big payoff is.



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