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Y300 Stirling Engine

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posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 11:26 AM
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Just came across this anyone heard of this type of engine You think it's feasible power ? Kind of cool none the less !




edit on 10/16/2019 by Gargoyle91 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

"Show me the data" in the words of Mark Dansie.



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 11:32 AM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

I believe low-temperature-differential engines like this one do not have great energy output

www.alternative-energy-tutorials.com...



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

yeah I guess they have been around for awhile 1st i've heard of them .



A Stirling engine is a heat engine that is operated by a cyclic compression and expansion of air or other gas (the working fluid) at different temperatures, such that there is a net conversion of heat energy to mechanical work.[1][2] More specifically, the Stirling engine is a closed-cycle regenerative heat engine with a permanently gaseous working fluid. Closed-cycle, in this context, means a thermodynamic system in which the working fluid is permanently contained within the system, and regenerative describes the use of a specific type of internal heat exchanger and thermal store, known as the regenerator. Strictly speaking, the inclusion of the regenerator is what differentiates a Stirling engine from other closed cycle hot air engines.[3]

Originally conceived in 1816[4] as an industrial prime mover to rival the steam engine, its practical use was largely confined to low-power domestic applications for over a century.[5]



Source Wikipedia

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edit on 17/10/2019 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

Couple disadvantages I noticed without looking it up but now confirmed:

1. Size. Very large and heavy.
2. Start time. Takes a while to get it going.

Many more but another one is constant speed. It can be throttled but it's not easy to achieve. It is ideal though for some applications. NASA is using it right now on some KRUSTY application.

But this is the case for all engines. Depends on the application. Mazda rotary engines are great for sports cars. It's like have Mighty Mouse under the hood but it totally inefficient and dirty and why nobody uses them anymore. Fun as hell though in a sports car.



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 11:41 AM
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Yep lots of easy diy Stirling engines on YouTube my friend.

This is a pretty example, but I've seen these done with toilet paper tubes and soda bottles. They're very (this is neat) but no reasonable output.



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: Gargoyle91

The cool thing about Stirlings is that they can run with pretty much any source of heat.

There are Combined Heat and Power units available which are pretty impressive.
www.okofen-e.com...
helec.co.uk...



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: Gargoyle91

The cool thing about Stirlings is that they can run with pretty much any source of heat.

There are Combined Heat and Power units available which are pretty impressive.
www.okofen-e.com...
helec.co.uk...


That is true, NASA is using uranium I believe. Great for long range and applications that have to have something that is simple and damn near bullet proof. It could have backup solar power, geothermal power. Doesn't matter, just some heat source.



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 12:44 PM
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originally posted by: Gargoyle91
Just came across this anyone heard of this type of engine You think it's feasible power ? Kind of cool none the less!

From what I understand, it's really hard for them to generate any usable power / torque. You get out what you put in. A little bit of movement from a heat exchange. And heat exchange is pretty slow. Not like explosions.



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 01:03 PM
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They are mostly not so powerful, however:

Philips did some research back in the day and made major improvements, even had a city bus and a boat running on Stirling engines. Even the US air force experimented with it and had a car running on a stirling for dayly use in and around the airport.

Another advantage is that it is a very efficient cooler ( refrigerator ) still in use to day in labs and medical. They call it cryogenerator or something like that i believe. It works by using the system in reverse and you can generate heat and extreme cold very fast.

Here is an extensive in dept documentary about it:





The cooling applications once lead to a camping or truck cooler that was very very very efficient. Coleman sold these for a while.

Unfortunately they were so efficient they stopped selling them for a reasonable price to the public, and started to sell the same Technic to the medical world as portable containers for transplants for 20 times the price.


edit on 16-10-2019 by EartOccupant because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 01:34 PM
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They have limited applications for there power output and size. I read a scifi space story where they were used on habitats using the heat from sun to run huge sterlings.

That old tech may become very useful when space and gravity isn't an issue. Imagine huge flywheels being spun up storing mechanical energy for later use. No friction in space to slow them down so it is just stored that way to be used when needed.



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 01:52 PM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
That old tech may become very useful when space and gravity isn't an issue. Imagine huge flywheels being spun up storing mechanical energy for later use. No friction in space to slow them down so it is just stored that way to be used when needed.

A big space station spinning in the Earth's magnetic field might generate a little bit of usable electricity.



posted on Oct, 16 2019 @ 02:21 PM
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Always been fascinated by stirling engines .

I got this for Christmas last year. Might be a good gift selection for somebody .

Quite the conversation piece over a cup of coffee .



I haven’t used it in a while. It almost sounds like a hit miss engine . 😁
edit on 16-10-2019 by Fallingdown because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2019 @ 12:14 PM
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Sterling powered Swedish patrol sub
en.wikipedia.org...




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