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Looking for a superb ATS burger. Who knws what goes in it?

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posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 02:09 PM
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There are a lot of factors that go into a good burger. Type of meat, fat content, spices ( Like a few others have already said, I'm in the camp that for burgers salt and pepper are all that's required ), things mixed into the meat before forming it into patties ( Some personal favorites are chopped, freshly cooked bacon, small frozen butter cubes, caramelized onion and / or small chunks of cheese - Swiss or cheddar are good ).

Cooking methods are equally as important. Over flame is my preference but a great burger can also be prepared in a pan. The key is to start with a properly shaped patty ( I prefer a patty that's about 1" thick before cooking ), sear the patty on both sides to lock in juices and then lower the temperature to medium after searing to allow the interior to cook adequately.

I prefer rare beef but when it comes to burgers I tend to err on the side of caution and go for at least medium well.

One of the biggest keys, though, is cooking discipline. Resist the urge to poke, cut and squish the burger as it's cooking. Interfering with your meat will cause it to be leathery and dry. Just touching the top with a spatula or fork and waiting for the resistance to feel about the same as the part of your palm closest to your thumb is a fair indicator of the burger being done. Also the juices will become clear and bubbly around the medium well range.




posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: Hefficide


The key is to start with a properly shaped patty ( I prefer a patty that's about 1" thick before cooking ), sear the patty on both sides to lock in juices and then lower the temperature to medium after searing to allow the interior to cook adequately.


I put a hearty dimple in the middle of my patties too to prevent it from turning into a ball on the grill.

Aside from that, I think you gave the best rundown thus far.
edit on 14-10-2019 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: zatara

The Food Depot Sirloin Burgers, Newnan, Georgia @ $3.29 / pound. Gourmet quality that will blow McDonald's away and they are light on the grease. I cook em on the grill such that they will be pink on the inside. Never had a bad one in 4+ years.

So above is a hint. Buy your own sirloin and grind it. Use only Choice grade!

Another hint is to take a cast iron frying pan. Put it on the grill and squirt some liquid butter and put those burgers on it so as to sear the meat for a minute or two; each side. That's what restaurants do for steaks but it can be applied to burgers. Then remove and put over the flames. It with keep them juicy. Also hotter the better; Natural Gas Grill is 300+ degrees hotter as compared to Propane.

BUBBA VEGGIE Burgers. Anywhere USA. Try them on an Arnold's Potato Hamburger Bun with Lighthouse chunky blue cheese dressing with a tomato and crispy dill pickle.
edit on 14-10-2019 by Waterglass because: added

edit on 14-10-2019 by Waterglass because: added



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 02:20 PM
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Heres one i make from time to time:

Slice up a yellow, a red, and a green bell pepper into thin strips, then a medium yellow onion into thin strips.

Sautee them in butter and a packet of fajita seasoning,
Mixing up your own seasoning is easy too, and recipes for it abound online.

Sautee thos veggies till they are well done, and the seasoning is carmelizing nicely.

Patty up your fav meat, and season with salt pepper, and a little more fajita seasoning. Cook to your desired doneness, then top with a bunch of the veggies, then cover liberally with shredded mozzarella.

Other cheese styles could be substituted as desired, but mozzerella melts nice and blends flavors well.

After the cheese melts nice, put the burger on a toasted bun and top with your favorite salsa.

My wife likes a side bowl of salsa as well to dip the burger in.

Viola, the fajita burger.



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 02:39 PM
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I don't know about mc'd burgers, but when I make mine I sprinkle a few red pepper flakes on them. Can't say I'm a fan of spicy food or anything like that, but a trick I learned a few years back is just a splash of red pepper flakes on the patty really brings out the flavor of the meat... and as far as I'm concerned, the meat is the purpose of the burger- why drown it in fancy sauce?



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: Hefficide

You are absolutely right. If the cooking is not done correct than it will be a shame for all those wondeful ingredients. Two weeks ago I was in Prague, Czechoslovakia with some friends and we decided to have our lunch in a restaurant. Two of us ordered a hamburger which was presented with the most exclusive meat. The entire hamburger was rated a three out of ten because of the bunny. Although there was nothing wrong with it just didn't fit the burger and had a greasy shine to it. Somehow it disturbed the "experience". Presentation is also an ingredient which can make or brake a dish.




edit on 14/10/2019 by zatara because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 03:21 PM
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80% sirloin 20% bacon ground together.
Salt and pepper.
Toast the buns with butter on a griddle.
2 slices of cheese.
Grilled onion slices.
Pickles jalapeno slices.
Extra Sam's Choice spicy maple bourbon pickles.
Salad on the side.
edit on 14-10-2019 by Homefree because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: zatara

What is "exclusive meat" and "bunny"?

Was it rabbit meat? I'm confused.



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 03:43 PM
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Most places do a course salt and pepper than if it's a "special " burger they put steak seasoning on it

One of the most important parts is making every burger the exact same I do this with a food scale and a burger press

I normaly do salt and pepper than put them on the cold side to smoke and let the salt get into the meat than I'll slide my grate over the fire to cook them ... never had a burger go un eaten



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Sorry..some beef from Argentina and the bunny ..you know..sorry you do not know. The spherical bread used for hamburgers?


edit on 14/10/2019 by zatara because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 03:45 PM
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Element 115?
Wider mystery meat than the bun
So it looks like a flying saucer



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: serpo
Element 115?
Wider mystery meat than the bun
So it looks like a flying saucer


Sorry..english is not the language I speak at home and make mistakes.




posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: zatara

I know I’m late to your hamburger party, here’s a good read. The most important take from this article I believe is this

“ Avoid over-handling the patties ———-Instead, barely combine the ground brisket and short rib in your hands and then press them into patties on the skillet with a spatula.”

One way to make a burger



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: zatara

I've made burgers using various spices, but have pretty much settled on the simple. After making the patties (ground chuck), season each side with:

A little bit of Worcestershire.
Salt
Pepper
A little Mrs. Dash.

One thing I have found that make the burger taste amazing is cooking it on the same grill I have smoked meat on. I rarely clean my grill, just scrap a little of the stuff off with a wire brush and spray it with oil, and that smoked stuff on the grill imparts an amazing flavor.

I also never cook my burgers until well-done, but still pink. I usually use swiss, mushrooms, occasionally some jalapenos, horseradish sauce, and/or horseradish mustard, and/or sometime a little hummus.

As an occasional option, which I learned from a burger joint here in Atlanta, is, after cooking and after putting it on a bun, add a few jalapeno kettle chips. It's...different
edit on 14-10-2019 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 05:12 PM
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This is a favorite in our house and I'll admit it's off the wall and not to everyone's taste but we're an odd bunch.
Lean ground beef
Salt and pepper
Lawry's seasoning salt
Crushed Doritos ( favourite flavor is BBQ )
There's definitely a balance between meat and Doritos and if you put in too many chips it doesn't bind well and overpowers the burger but the correct amount is about 1/2 cup to each pound of beef.
We cook them in the oven but can be pan fried as well.



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: zatara

What is "exclusive meat" and "bunny"?

Was it rabbit meat? I'm confused.


Maybe English is his second language? There are a lot of errors in that writing so I'm thinking it is. Kudos for learning another language though.

Edit - Well, I was right.
edit on 14-10-2019 by HalWesten because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: HalWesten

That's okay, I understand. Does a great job. I just didn't understand.



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 07:16 PM
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I mix soy sauce...worchester sauce, and some hot sauce in with the mince. Then i make two thin patties and put different combos on top...like wasabi and chedder. You then press the two patties together and pinch em closed so your ingredients are in the middle of the burger.

Its gawddang delicious.

I like some jalapanoes and blue cheese as well.
edit on 14-10-2019 by lakenheath24 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: zatara

Your English is excellent!! Don't apologize for your English!

I absolutely love your English, but I just didn't understand what you were saying on that one particular thing.

I have the highest regard for someone who speaks / writes English. It's a very difficult language, but it's also very specific. Chinese is difficult too, but not nearly as specific because it's regional. The language I really struggle with myself is Latin American Spanish, which is completely different from the Spanish I learned, and I speak fairly good Spanish. Latin American Spanish is like a hybrid of Portuguese and Spanish, and it's damn near impossible to learn (for me anyway). Not even the Spaniards can speak it very well.



posted on Oct, 14 2019 @ 09:27 PM
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Beetroot or pineapple slices always pop



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