It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A woman was shot and killed by a Fort Worth police officer in her own home

page: 1
28
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:05 AM
link   
Another person shot in their home by police in the DFW area.

This time through a window from the outside.


A black woman was shot and killed by a white police officer in her Fort Worth, Texas home after a neighbor called dispatchers to report the woman's front door was open, police said.
The officers were searching the perimeter of the woman's home when they saw a person standing near a window inside and one of them opened fire, killing her, Fort Worth police said.

The Tarrant County Medical Examiner identified the woman killed as 28-year-old Atatiana Koquice Jefferson. She died at 2:30 a.m. Saturday in the bedroom of her home.

Hours after the shooting, police released a heavily edited version of the officer's body camera footage. The nearly 2-minute video shows officers walking outside the home with flashlights for a few minutes before one of them yells, "Put your hands up! Show me your hands!" and shoots his weapon through a window.
...
James Smith, Jefferson's neighbor, told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram he called a non-emergency police number when he saw her doors open and lights on in the early morning hours. He said he knew Jefferson was home with her nephew.

Link


USA today




posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:10 AM
link   
Is this some training/protocol issue?

Officer "feels" threatened.

"show me your hands" while looking through a window versus moving out of the line or seeking a different vantage.

Just shoot and wait for the dust to settle?



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:11 AM
link   
Highly doubt any criminal charges in this case, unlike Dallas.
Officer should lose badge & be dismissed for bad judgement and improper firearm use.
No rush to judgement here, just my take on likely outcome. Unless of course there's more to the story.

ganjoa

edit on 2019-10-13 by ganjoa because: To be or not to be? Izzat the question? Spellin'


+6 more 
posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:14 AM
link   
a reply to: ganjoa

The troubling part to me is if this is deemed OK then it means police can shoot anyone through a window with no ramifications.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:17 AM
link   

The officer who shot her was identified by police only as a white male who has been on the force for about 18 months. Police also released a photo of a gun found in the home.

Lawyer S. Lee Merritt, who represents the families of Jean and of Jefferson, said Jefferson had been playing video games with a nephew before Saturday's shooting.

He said police had provided no connection between the gun found inside the home and the shooting.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:17 AM
link   
He should be publicly hung by the neck until DEAD. Texas style.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:25 AM
link   

originally posted by: roadgravelThe officer who shot her was identified by police only as a white male who has been on the force for about 18 months. Police also released a photo of a gun found in the home.


getting in a bit of implied justification right from the off.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:34 AM
link   

originally posted by: RoScoLaz5

originally posted by: roadgravelThe officer who shot her was identified by police only as a white male who has been on the force for about 18 months. Police also released a photo of a gun found in the home.


getting in a bit of implied justification right from the off.


That’s exactly how it looks to me. And they only released still shots of the gun, so we have no idea where it was found and where it was in relation to the resident.

But beyond that, the call came in that the door is open, both vehicles are there. It’s not at all unreasonable to think the homeowner may be home, and it’s not at all unreasonable to think the homeowner may notice flashlights flashing around their house, and going to investigate it.

Short of coming around the corner to find a gun leveled at his face, I can’t see any reason for an officer to move from verbal commands to lethal force so quickly in this situation. One can presume he did not come nose-to-barrel with a gun, judging by the commands he gave.

Absolutely mind boggling.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:52 AM
link   

originally posted by: roadgravel
a reply to: ganjoa

The troubling part to me is if this is deemed OK then it means police can shoot anyone through a window with no ramifications.


I would go so fsr as to say that has already happened. How many of hesr police-shooting-before-questions incodents have we had the past few years? How many officers have been punished, much less lost their jobs as a result? Most of them don't even get a slap on the wrist. The ploice departments will do and say anything they have to, in order to not punish an officer for even a clearly wrong shoot.

Cue the members on this forum who will be in shortly to yell at me and tell me what a cop-hater I am.

Which is untrue. Expecting police officers to use the extreme power they have in a responsible manner does not equal cop-hater.

As far as this story goes: why does an open door=call the police? Why in the world did the neighbor call the ploice for that? I know they called the non-emergency line, but still. Why?

I love how the PD released a picture of a gun they found in the home, after they'd already killed the woman; before even entering the home, in fact. Unfortunately, their obvious hope of "If we just show a pic that the woman had a gun in her house, the public will get the inference and assume she was a criminal and it's ok that we shot and killed her from outside her house." will work on many.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 11:55 AM
link   

originally posted by: RoScoLaz5

originally posted by: roadgravelThe officer who shot her was identified by police only as a white male who has been on the force for about 18 months. Police also released a photo of a gun found in the home.


getting in a bit of implied justification right from the off.


Yes.

Cleatly the officer was wrong to kill this woman from her front yard, but the idiot media with their race baiting is deplorable. Why else mention the race of each? If it were reversed, would they specify that? "The white woman was shot by a black male officer." They would never print that.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:03 PM
link   

originally posted by: ganjoa
Highly doubt any criminal charges in this case, unlike Dallas.
Officer should lose badge & be dismissed for bad judgement and improper firearm use.
No rush to judgement here, just my take on likely outcome. Unless of course there's more to the story.

ganjoa


Its manslaughter anyway you look at it when you are shot through your own bedroom window doing nothing. In many places it is shoot first ask questions later. 8 years would work...


Manslaughter is an unlawful killing that doesn't involve malice aforethought—intent to seriously harm or kill, or extreme, reckless disregard for life. The absence of malice aforethought means that manslaughter involves less moral blame than either first or second degree murder.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: Shamrock6

originally posted by: RoScoLaz5

originally posted by: roadgravelThe officer who shot her was identified by police only as a white male who has been on the force for about 18 months. Police also released a photo of a gun found in the home.


getting in a bit of implied justification right from the off.


That’s exactly how it looks to me. And they only released still shots of the gun, so we have no idea where it was found and where it was in relation to the resident.

But beyond that, the call came in that the door is open, both vehicles are there. It’s not at all unreasonable to think the homeowner may be home, and it’s not at all unreasonable to think the homeowner may notice flashlights flashing around their house, and going to investigate it.

Short of coming around the corner to find a gun leveled at his face, I can’t see any reason for an officer to move from verbal commands to lethal force so quickly in this situation. One can presume he did not come nose-to-barrel with a gun, judging by the commands he gave.

Absolutely mind boggling.


The call was classified as a "Welfare Check". Isn't SOP in that case approach the front door (with caution as always), ring or knock on the door, identify themselves as police called out to check on the welfare of the resident, all done first before entering to actually DO the check?

What kind of SOP does this dept have where they surround a house, at night, inspect with flashlights, with sidearms drawn? Seriously?



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:15 PM
link   


Outright murder, if you ask me. weak as piss cowards...



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: Krakatoa

originally posted by: Shamrock6

originally posted by: RoScoLaz5

originally posted by: roadgravelThe officer who shot her was identified by police only as a white male who has been on the force for about 18 months. Police also released a photo of a gun found in the home.


getting in a bit of implied justification right from the off.


That’s exactly how it looks to me. And they only released still shots of the gun, so we have no idea where it was found and where it was in relation to the resident.

But beyond that, the call came in that the door is open, both vehicles are there. It’s not at all unreasonable to think the homeowner may be home, and it’s not at all unreasonable to think the homeowner may notice flashlights flashing around their house, and going to investigate it.

Short of coming around the corner to find a gun leveled at his face, I can’t see any reason for an officer to move from verbal commands to lethal force so quickly in this situation. One can presume he did not come nose-to-barrel with a gun, judging by the commands he gave.

Absolutely mind boggling.


The call was classified as a "Welfare Check". Isn't SOP in that case approach the front door (with caution as always), ring or knock on the door, identify themselves as police called out to check on the welfare of the resident, all done first before entering to actually DO the check?

What kind of SOP does this dept have where they surround a house, at night, inspect with flashlights, with sidearms drawn? Seriously?



Good point. Man!!!! The more one thinks about this situation, the worse it gets. It will be interesting to see what more "justifications" the police department tries to float.

Because that gun-found-in-the-home picture they released would be comical if it weren't so serious a subject.

Think about that decision being made- to release a photo of a gun in the woman's home (where, by the way, no crime was being investigated!). How desperate was the ploice chief and the department's PR officer, to release that photo just hours after the event? How panicked must they have been, to have released such an out-of-context (or maybe we should say no-context) picture? Stupid and obvious.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Krakatoa

As far as I’m aware it was dispatched as an “open structure call.” Essentially that means “this building is unsecured, that’s unusual, find out why it’s unsecured.” That also means it could be anything from somebody is in the middle of carrying groceries into their home to somebody is in the house that isn’t supposed to be.

Even on a welfare check it’s not uncommon to look in windows before announcing. With an unknown cause, it probably isn’t the best idea to announce at the front door before checking out the rest of the house.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:31 PM
link   

originally posted by: KansasGirl

originally posted by: RoScoLaz5

originally posted by: roadgravelThe officer who shot her was identified by police only as a white male who has been on the force for about 18 months. Police also released a photo of a gun found in the home.


getting in a bit of implied justification right from the off.

Cleatly the officer was wrong to kill this woman from her front yard, but the idiot media with their race baiting is deplorable. Why else mention the race of each? If it were reversed, would they specify that? "The white woman was shot by a black male officer." They would never print that.


what is worse than the race baiting is comments i have read on the news stories. racist comments saying that only black police should police black people. and that no white police should ever be involved in policing black people. of course feeding off the racist narratives pushed by the media. after all the years fighting for equal rights and desegregation, it seems the leftists are pushing hard for resegragation. but i guess that should be no surprise since it was the democrats that were the biggest hinderance to desegregation and stopping slavery in the first place.

seriously race is not even a factor in this (as per usual). the issue is out of control and scared of their own shadow police. they were there for a welfare check. that means they should not only have been expecting the legal resident to be there, but were there to protect her. not to kill her. if you think about it, crying racism is actually a ploy to protect the police and the way they do things. it takes away the responsibility of what happened from the police and their operations, when people think it's just another racist. instead of highlighting that it was the actions caused by the way police have a habit of operating that is at fault. and if things get bad, they can always throw the officer under the bus, call it racism, and continue on as before. and people would gladly accept that outcome instead of demanding that police be brought under proper control.



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:33 PM
link   
a reply to: gallop

In that body cam video, you see the officer is sneaking around the property, walking around and looking into the cars and door/windows with a flashlight at approx 2:30am. Had I been in the house, and saw someone sneaking around my property, at that early hour, with a flashlight, I'd have retrieved my sidearm in anticipation of protecting myself and family from home invaders. These officers NEVER identified themselves at all, not once.

Now if you freeze it at the 1:34 mark you will see the officer with his sidearm drawn and held up next to the flashlight. He see's a figure in the window as he sneaks up to it, light in the face of the victim, and shouts rapidly.

"Put your hands up!!.. Show me your hands!!"

Then immediately discharges his weapon into the window.

WTF kind of SOP is that for a welfare check call????
Did the station attempt to call the home number, or lookup the resident's cell number? To call first to do the welfare check before even entering the property?



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: Krakatoa

As far as I’m aware it was dispatched as an “open structure call.” Essentially that means “this building is unsecured, that’s unusual, find out why it’s unsecured.” That also means it could be anything from somebody is in the middle of carrying groceries into their home to somebody is in the house that isn’t supposed to be.

Even on a welfare check it’s not uncommon to look in windows before announcing. With an unknown cause, it probably isn’t the best idea to announce at the front door before checking out the rest of the house.


Is it SOP to attempt to contact the homeowner by telephone fist to check before even entering the property?

Or is it to shout to show/raise hands, and when they do, shoot them out of fear for their own lives?
Or is it to shout to show/raise hands, and when they do not, shoot them out of fear for their own lives?

Nice two deadly options to choose from in less than a second.

Because, THAT is what I saw in the body cam footage, sir.


edit on 10/13/2019 by Krakatoa because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:37 PM
link   
a reply to: roadgravel

straight up murder



posted on Oct, 13 2019 @ 12:39 PM
link   
a reply to: Krakatoa

Absolutely. I think anyone seeing and hearing someone sneaking around their house would be thinking the worst, especially with no identifying remarks or notice.

But I don't even believe she had the gun in her hands.. I certainly don't think the officer saw her with it, before firing. I think his 18 months on the job was inadequate, his training inadequate and his ability inadequate to be in that position, and he panicked. It was only on entering the home was the gun found, pictured and posted.

As if to justify the legal crime that has just been committed.

People are saying it's not murder, but he'll still be punished for it.

I hope he has nightmares for the rest of his life, personally.. the sort that fill you with horrid feelings for the entire day, if he's not found guilty of what he committed.



new topics

top topics



 
28
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join