It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

One way special relationship? The disgusting behaviour of the US government!

page: 6
13
<< 3  4  5    7  8  9 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:31 PM
link   

originally posted by: alldaylong

In America it appears you can be charged before you have even been questioned.

What a bloody system they have.


So in the UK do you issue arrest warrants? In the US before a judge approves an arrest warrant the prosecutor needs to provide evidence to the judge to justify it and that is called a charge. Also, an arrest is not admission of guilt.




posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: ScepticScot

Which means you NEED to speak, which can lead to self incrimination. In the US you don't need to speak jack squat and it can never be held against you.


It doesn't mean you need to speak at all. It specifically says that. You can go thorough the entire process of a criminal charge without uttering a word and it won't be legally held against you.*

* My personal view is that in a jury trial it will be regardless of what the law says but that applies everywhere.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:35 PM
link   
a reply to: ScepticScot

You need to or it WILL be held against you. In the US it can't be.

and it won't be legally held against you.


I just sourced that is not true. If you do not speak then it will be used against you.

You do not have to say anything. But, it may harm your defence



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: alldaylong

In America it appears you can be charged before you have even been questioned.

What a bloody system they have.


So in the UK do you issue arrest warrants? In the US before a judge approves an arrest warrant the prosecutor needs to provide evidence to the judge to justify it and that is called a charge. Also, an arrest is not admission of guilt.


There are arrest warrants in English law but they mean something different I think than the US system. They are mainly a way of getting someone to appear in court rather than part of the police arrest process.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:38 PM
link   

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: alldaylong

In America it appears you can be charged before you have even been questioned.

What a bloody system they have.


So in the UK do you issue arrest warrants? In the US before a judge approves an arrest warrant the prosecutor needs to provide evidence to the judge to justify it and that is called a charge. Also, an arrest is not admission of guilt.


There are arrest warrants in English law but they mean something different I think than the US system. They are mainly a way of getting someone to appear in court rather than part of the police arrest process.

Semantics, same thing in the US. You are suppose to turn yourself in, if you don't, they issue a warrant, the police arrest you, and you go to court.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: ScepticScot

You need to or it WILL be held against you. In the US it can't be.

and it won't be legally held against you.


I just sourced that is not true. If you do not speak then it will be used against you.

You do not have to say anything. But, it may harm your defence



You cut off the end of statement which is rather dishonest.

"You do not have to say anything, but it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in Court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence”.

Not saying anything doesn't harm defence. As already covered it means courts may decide to put less weight on statements that you only provide once the case is underway.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:44 PM
link   

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: alldaylong

In America it appears you can be charged before you have even been questioned.

What a bloody system they have.


So in the UK do you issue arrest warrants? In the US before a judge approves an arrest warrant the prosecutor needs to provide evidence to the judge to justify it and that is called a charge. Also, an arrest is not admission of guilt.


There are arrest warrants in English law but they mean something different I think than the US system. They are mainly a way of getting someone to appear in court rather than part of the police arrest process.

Semantics, same thing in the US. You are suppose to turn yourself in, if you don't, they issue a warrant, the police arrest you, and you go to court.


Not really semantics as they , as far as I understand it, are used in different circumstances between the US and UK.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: ScepticScot

You need to or it WILL be held against you. In the US it can't be.

and it won't be legally held against you.


I just sourced that is not true. If you do not speak then it will be used against you.

You do not have to say anything. But, it may harm your defence



You cut off the end of statement which is rather dishonest.

"You do not have to say anything, but it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in Court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence”.

Not saying anything doesn't harm defence. As already covered it means courts may decide to put less weight on statements that you only provide once the case is underway.

The end doesn't have a qualifier for the beginning and thus doesn't change the meaning, so no dishonesty. If you do not tell the police your defense, then it will be held against you when you use it in court. What I quoted or what you quoted, they both say the same thing.

In America what you DO say can hurt your case (or help it), but not saying anything can never hurt your case, you do not need to tell the police your alibi or your defense, and if you do not, it will NOT harm your defense.

Anyways, the post was geared towards the other poster who foolishly decided to post about how superior and amazing the UK is and how horrible nazi like the US is.
edit on 10-10-2019 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: alldaylong

In America it appears you can be charged before you have even been questioned.

What a bloody system they have.


So in the UK do you issue arrest warrants? In the US before a judge approves an arrest warrant the prosecutor needs to provide evidence to the judge to justify it and that is called a charge. Also, an arrest is not admission of guilt.


There are arrest warrants in English law but they mean something different I think than the US system. They are mainly a way of getting someone to appear in court rather than part of the police arrest process.

Semantics, same thing in the US. You are suppose to turn yourself in, if you don't, they issue a warrant, the police arrest you, and you go to court.


Not really semantics as they , as far as I understand it, are used in different circumstances between the US and UK.



I am actually interested how it is used there. In the US if you do not turn yourself in they will go before a judge and give the evidence and ask for a warrant. That warrant is then used to arrest you and bring you in to court.

How is warrant used there? How do you deal with a person who is suspected of a crime, runs, and refuses to turn themselves in?



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: ScepticScot

You need to or it WILL be held against you. In the US it can't be.

and it won't be legally held against you.


I just sourced that is not true. If you do not speak then it will be used against you.

You do not have to say anything. But, it may harm your defence



You cut off the end of statement which is rather dishonest.

"You do not have to say anything, but it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in Court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence”.

Not saying anything doesn't harm defence. As already covered it means courts may decide to put less weight on statements that you only provide once the case is underway.

The end doesn't have a qualifier for the beginning and thus doesn't change the meaning, so no dishonesty. If you do not tell the police your defense, then it will be held against you when you use it in court. What I quoted or what you quoted, they both say the same thing.

In America what you DO say can hurt your case (or help it), but not saying anything can never hurt your case, you do not need to tell the police your alibi or your defense, and if you do not, it will NOT harm your defense.

Anyways, the post was geared towards the other poster who foolishly decided to post about how superior and amazing the UK is and how horrible nazi like the US is.


No, they don't say the same thing at all.

You claimed that if you do not speak it may be used against you and misquoted the warning to back that up.


edit on 10-10-2019 by ScepticScot because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:57 PM
link   
a reply to: ScepticScot

Serious abuses against the USA

Hope that helps.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: alldaylong

In America it appears you can be charged before you have even been questioned.

What a bloody system they have.


So in the UK do you issue arrest warrants? In the US before a judge approves an arrest warrant the prosecutor needs to provide evidence to the judge to justify it and that is called a charge. Also, an arrest is not admission of guilt.


There are arrest warrants in English law but they mean something different I think than the US system. They are mainly a way of getting someone to appear in court rather than part of the police arrest process.

Semantics, same thing in the US. You are suppose to turn yourself in, if you don't, they issue a warrant, the police arrest you, and you go to court.


Not really semantics as they , as far as I understand it, are used in different circumstances between the US and UK.



I am actually interested how it is used there. In the US if you do not turn yourself in they will go before a judge and give the evidence and ask for a warrant. That warrant is then used to arrest you and bring you in to court.

How is warrant used there? How do you deal with a person who is suspected of a crime, runs, and refuses to turn themselves in?


Going slightly off topic but my understanding of US system (and please do correct me where I am wrong) is that arrest warrants are a requirement before the police can arrest you in many circumstances.

In UK more of a court device after person has already been charged to them appear at court.

Perhaps Oldcarpy who I believe is a lawyer (albeit not criminal law) could explain better.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: thedigirati
a reply to: ScepticScot

Serious abuses against the USA

Hope that helps.


Article from 2 years that mentions a few cases over a few years (none of which involve a death).

Doesn't suggest it happens all the time.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: thedigirati
a reply to: ScepticScot

Serious abuses against the USA

Hope that helps.


Article from 2 years that mentions a few cases over a few years (none of which involve a death).

Doesn't suggest it happens all the time.


where or when did I say death happenes all the time?? sorry it was not as tragic what about the two officers??

thanks for moving the goal posts yeah a few million in leves is is nothing.

so your ONE instances is HUGE . what makes your rights more important? seriously?



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:06 PM
link   
Possible double standard from US?

en.m.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:07 PM
link   
a reply to: ScepticScot

did you edit that before posting it? wiki's are easy to edit.

Try once again....



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: thedigirati
a reply to: ScepticScot

did you edit that before posting it? wiki's are easy to edit.

Try once again....


Also shows was last edited a year ago.

Would you like to try again?



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: thedigirati

originally posted by: ScepticScot

originally posted by: thedigirati
a reply to: ScepticScot

Serious abuses against the USA

Hope that helps.


Article from 2 years that mentions a few cases over a few years (none of which involve a death).

Doesn't suggest it happens all the time.


where or when did I say death happenes all the time?? sorry it was not as tragic what about the two officers??

thanks for moving the goal posts yeah a few million in leves is is nothing.

so your ONE instances is HUGE . what makes your rights more important? seriously?






What have my rights got to do with anything posted???

I said serious cares of abuse don't seem to happen that often. I certainly don't count parking fines etc as serious ( if you do you might want to check out how much they US embassy owes in London).

Sexual assault etc absolutely terrible abuse of diplomatic immunity, but still seems pretty rare and fact it has happened doesn't really excuse use of it to avoid a death by dangerous driving charge.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:15 PM
link   
a reply to: NotSoBigG

If Justice be Served , the Law Will take Care of Her .



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:16 PM
link   
a reply to: ScepticScot

2019

we had an entire embassy shoot it out
edit on 10-10-2019 by thedigirati because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
13
<< 3  4  5    7  8  9 >>

log in

join