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Where's Greta? U.S. pellet exports boom as Europe mixes wood with coal to reduce carbon footprint!

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posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6
lol it is alright.




posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: Oleandra88
If it rots away somewhere untouched then wood produces the same footprint.

Incorrect.

Your analysis fails to take into account the energy required to produce the pellets, as well as the energy lost converting, capturing and delivering the heat.

All things not found when wood rots.

All mentioned in my original post, and specified as to being required knowledge for calculating how much the pellet combustion compares to the local coal equivalent.



posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: peck420

I wrote wood, not pellets. I thought it is clear because I made distinctions throughout my message.

But yes, pellets take some energy but other ways it would be waste or used as animal stray or other things. End up in your food in the worst case, not kidding you.

It is saw dust and little wood with a binder and these have to be certified here so there is nothing in it.



posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: Oleandra88
You are making the mistake of assuming what occurs in your market, occurs in all markets.

The closest thing I have to a local pellet supply is going to be produced from raw lumber (not cut for logging so can't be used for anything but waste), and powered by coal or old NG burners (for the drying and pressing needs).

It is done this way because it is cheap, fyi.

The only high efficiency local producer produces for international shipment only.

Should my area be switching to pellet power? No. But, we are, because the marketing says it is good for everyone!

I guess I could just ship efficiently made pellets in...but that seems like a pretty large energy waste versus just using the abundant, and local, NG sources.



posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 03:30 PM
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La reply to: dantanna
Reminds me of Cheryl Crow saying to use one square of paper to wipr your butt. Love Cheryl ...butt.....



posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: Waterglass


Where is Greta???

She is making music videos with her bud AOC and the Eat Babies lady.




posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 05:39 PM
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originally posted by: highvein

originally posted by: odzeandennz
Who are the dummies here.... Greta and the western Europe not cutting their own forests for energy or the people deforesting and removing all regulations on their eco system...?


The dummies are the one's that cry about it, but still uses products that are made via things they claim causes the problem.





posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 06:50 PM
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originally posted by: odzeandennz

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: odzeandennz

Earth Matters

In the United States, which contains 8 percent of the world's forests, there are more trees than there were 100 years ago. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), "Forest growth nationally has exceeded harvest since the 1940s. By 1997, forest growth exceeded harvest by 42 percent and the volume of forest growth was 380 percent greater than it had been in 1920." The greatest gains have been seen on the East Coast (with average volumes of wood per acre almost doubling since the '50s) which was the area most heavily logged by European settlers beginning in the 1600s, soon after their arrival. This is great news for those who care about the environment because trees store CO2, produce oxygen — which is necessary for all life on Earth — remove toxins from the air, and create habitat for animals, insects and more basic forms of life. Well-managed forest plantations like those overseen by the Forest Stewardship Council also furnish us with wood, a renewable material that can be used for building, furniture, paper products and more, and all of which are biodegradable at the end of their lifecycle.

It looks like the US forestry system isn't run by dummies.





If you believe tree numbers are on the increase in america thats on you. Nice quote from a random article in 2011 which basically regurgitated an article posted in 2000 in the very first link of the article...

Maybe you should have googled a little harder... Tree/ shrubs plants are all on the decrease at a steady rate.

Keep googling..


No bs

I realize it may seem counterintuitive to you, but there are more trees now than there were 100 or even 200 years ago. Centuries ago, no one planted non fruit trees on a large scale basis. Now trees are planted and farmed for pulpwood, lumber and Christmas trees.
Did ever think about what happened when there were wildfires in the 1700’s? Who put them out? No one did.
They burned until they ran out of fuel or a rainstorm put them out.
There were ‘dark days’ in the early history of New England where you couldn’t see the Sun for up to a week at a time. I hen it rained, the rain was black. Fires to the West carried smoke and soot eastward to cause this. Smoke and soot from forest fires that burned massive swathes of forest.
Then we get to logging.
Not only were trees being cut for fuel and to build houses. Large, virgin forest trees were being cut for the shipbuilding industry, not only here, but in other countries.



posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 08:22 PM
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originally posted by: odzeandennz

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: odzeandennz

Earth Matters

In the United States, which contains 8 percent of the world's forests, there are more trees than there were 100 years ago. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), "Forest growth nationally has exceeded harvest since the 1940s. By 1997, forest growth exceeded harvest by 42 percent and the volume of forest growth was 380 percent greater than it had been in 1920." The greatest gains have been seen on the East Coast (with average volumes of wood per acre almost doubling since the '50s) which was the area most heavily logged by European settlers beginning in the 1600s, soon after their arrival. This is great news for those who care about the environment because trees store CO2, produce oxygen — which is necessary for all life on Earth — remove toxins from the air, and create habitat for animals, insects and more basic forms of life. Well-managed forest plantations like those overseen by the Forest Stewardship Council also furnish us with wood, a renewable material that can be used for building, furniture, paper products and more, and all of which are biodegradable at the end of their lifecycle.

It looks like the US forestry system isn't run by dummies.





If you believe tree numbers are on the increase in america thats on you. Nice quote from a random article in 2011 which basically regurgitated an article posted in 2000 in the very first link of the article...

Maybe you should have googled a little harder... Tree/ shrubs plants are all on the decrease at a steady rate.

Keep googling..


No bs



Okay Capt. Planet, what is your solution?



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: peck420


You are making the mistake of assuming what occurs in your market, occurs in all markets.

No I do not, I wrote I speak for my country only



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