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Rare weather event over Antarctica driving Australia's hot, dry outlook

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posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 05:57 AM
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So the big dry looks like it's going to get dryer.


A rare event that took place 30 kilometres above the South Pole last week is expected to impact upon Australia's rainfall outlook.


The upper atmosphere above Antarctica warmed by as much as 40 degrees Celsius in the course of a few days — and it is continuing to warm.


They are calling this SSW Sudden Stratospheric Warming, and is apparently a natural event and not global warming. That being said it's so dry where I live now as it is and we might not get any decent rain until after Christmas.

What a bizarre weather event.
LINK


I can't get the link to work from my mobile...
edit on 4-10-2019 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/4/2019 by Blaine91555 because: fixed link




posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 06:24 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

This worked for me



posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 01:16 PM
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They are calling this SSW Sudden Stratospheric Warming, and is apparently a natural event and not global warming.
a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed


Well that's refreshing.



posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: Pilgrum


Pretty dry over in Tassie too I believe. I'm on tank water here, looks like I will be getting a water truck in.




posted on Oct, 4 2019 @ 07:52 PM
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originally posted by: Wide-Eyes



They are calling this SSW Sudden Stratospheric Warming, and is apparently a natural event and not global warming.
a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed


Well that's refreshing.




Yes it does make a change, not sure about refreshing, it would be if it would frigging rain


This is what it looked like with a similar event back in 2002, I'm betting its gets even dryer.

edit on 4-10-2019 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 12:57 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

The Eastern side of Tas was always a bit dry being in the rain shadow of the central highlands but recent times have been drier than average. Got family on the east coast with tank water and the water trucks are doing good business last few years.

Going by that map, things look a bit back to front with record rain in the desert while traditional grazing/cropping land is in drought.



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 02:20 AM
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The actual temperatures are the same as always, if you look at historical records for your own region. It is usually within a specific range of temps, which often vary year to year.

There is obviously man-made pollution of our environment, that's for sure. Water and air pollution is a reality, and harmful to all life, which is the REAL problem we must address here.

This does not create 'climate change', or anything. The climate is no different than ever before. It's simply used as a red herring, to avoid the real problems we have to solve.



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

Its a man made event, by heisting the ionosphere the bounce back is severe, particularly against the Ozone layer, which allows much higher UV to penetrate the surface. Hence all of the trees in areas that are green appearing to be dying. it was also don't to move the Polar Vortex, some 8 weeks later, it's still off its axis by a large degree. By doing this, "they" stop the cold fronts from reaching Australia. It is still as far away from Australia as they can make it.

Winds at 10 HPA
edit on 5-10-2019 by Ozforsale because: Bad link



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 07:21 PM
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a reply to: Ozforsale

Interesting, so I take it you are referring to harrp when you refer to heisting the ionosphere?



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: Pilgrum

I was wondering about that blue in the desert there it does seem out of place, unless there just happened to be a freak rain right at that time.



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: turbonium1

I absolutely believe pollution to be the largest of issues we face as of of now, climate change which will happen regardless.



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: Ozforsale




by heisting the ionosphere

Say what?



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I'd put that record desert rain down to a cyclonic depression crossing the continent, it happens after a cyclone blows itself out when crossing over from sea to large dry inland areas. The data is acquired over a very short time period which can lead to a picture that doesn't faithfully represent longer time trends and the 'record' figures are from data collected over a time period that's too short to reveal longer time cyclic climate trends (centuries compared to millennia).



posted on Oct, 5 2019 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: Pilgrum

That makes sense.




posted on Oct, 6 2019 @ 04:19 AM
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originally posted by: Pilgrum
a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I'd put that record desert rain down to a cyclonic depression crossing the continent, it happens after a cyclone blows itself out when crossing over from sea to large dry inland areas. The data is acquired over a very short time period which can lead to a picture that doesn't faithfully represent longer time trends and the 'record' figures are from data collected over a time period that's too short to reveal longer time cyclic climate trends (centuries compared to millennia).


Good point. We are using a limited period of data, instead of factoring for potential longer cyclical patterns that may possibly happen over a thousand years time, or whatever.

Saying that, the historical records we DO have over the last century or so are very consistent, anyway. Nothing different in all that time suggests it doesn't change at all, but we don't know for sure, which goes to your point as a possible consideration, in future.



posted on Oct, 6 2019 @ 11:50 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Sorry for the spelling error, yes they heat the Ionosphere, regularly. And they can warm or cool any area of the globe they like. At the moment, the microwave is sending the furnace to Australia.

Ionisatio n process taking place



posted on Oct, 6 2019 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: Ozforsale


At the moment, the microwave is sending the furnace to Australia.


Microwaves go right through the ionosphere. And they don't warm air. Try running your microwave oven with nothing in it then measuring the temperature inside it.

Maybe they're bouncing them off the Moon?

Following the 1961 Moon-bounce success, the Navy continued development on what was called the Technical Research Ship Special Communications System (TRSSCOMM). TRSSCOMM allowed a ship, anywhere in the world, to transmit a message by beaming microwave transmissions toward the Moon. The Moon, acting as a passive reflector, would bounce the emission back to receiving stations on Earth, located at 90-degree quadrants around the globe.

airandspace.si.edu...

Nice satellite imagery of water vapor in the upper troposphere. But it's not the ionosphere and its not ionization.

edit on 10/7/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 11:39 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Yes but they do vaporise water vapour and hence allow a furnace with no clouds to build up over the inland regions.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: Ozforsale

Water vapor is already vaporized water. That's why it's called water vapor.
edit on 10/9/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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