It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Use water-jets to cut asteroids or comets that may be potential impact threats...

page: 2
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 07:18 PM
link   
Just attach a cable with an anchor and then use an even bigger rocket or thruster to pull the rock off of its current trajectory.
Wouldn't that work?




posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 07:58 PM
link   
a reply to: JHumm
Yes it probably would



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 08:03 PM
link   
a reply to: YouSir
The laser idea is a good idea also


Going more high-tech maybe also some type of antimatter emitting device.
Thanks for adding YouSir.



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 08:20 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage
Pushing the whole thing is a plausible approach, hopefully it's a not pushed into another impact trajectory.
I was more looking at eliminating the threat entirely. Basically by sending a group of drones that can attach to or get near the object close enough to cut. Using the existing data of said asteroid, place the contact points then inject at each point and drones glide off with the parts. Possibly taking them to a salvage yard or mining site for mineral extraction.
I get the point though there may be easier ways to conquer the issues with deflection processes.
I figured I would share a brainstorm with the ATS Scientific faculty that may have better access to hands on technology.

Thus far the ATS membership has shared it does not seem to be a good idea. And I can accept that.
Hopefully that advanced technology discussed among the Conspiracy theorists like myself Exist to eliminate such threats now.
Thanks to you all for taking time to brainstorm with me💪



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 08:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Ophiuchus 13




Pushing the whole thing is a plausible approach, hopefully it's a not pushed into another impact trajectory.
That can be pretty easily determined. And the earlier the effort is undertaken, the less the effort required to deflected it enough to miss. (sort of like global warming)

I looked it up. And don't want to waste the effort entirely. Let's use aluminum, nice and soft. Lets use a 6" deep cut because that's the deepest we can use:
www.kmtwaterjet.com...

At 90,000 psi we can make that cut at 3 in/min. At 9.2 gallons per minute.
www.kmtwaterjet.com...

You've just used 552 gallons (4,600 pounds) to make a 15' long cut, 6" deep. How many 15' long cuts, 6" deep are you going to have to make? I guess you could make a supersized unit, but that means more power and more water.

edit on 10/1/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 09:06 PM
link   
Tons and tons of water.
try sand blasting! and you use the rock for the sand.
still need a lot of liquid gas.

But they dont see big ones now,
untill 24 hour before it passes earth.
it would take 6 months to cut it up!!!
LOL...



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 09:42 PM
link   
better to just send a rocket up with a thruster to push it out of the way...assuming you can land on the asteroid...the further out the better as it would require less fuel, but of course, the harder it would be to target it to begin with.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 12:57 AM
link   

originally posted by: Ophiuchus 13
Space drone group or crafts approaches potential impact object surrounds or attaches to potential impact object P.I.O
Water-jets cut at engineered cut points to separate P.I.O into pieces.
The objects are often in pieces already which are only loosely bound by gravitational attraction into a "Rubble Pile". You can see pieces already there in this image of asteroid Itokawa:

Rubble Pile Asteroids


The moniker rubble pile is typically applied to all solar system bodies with Diameter between 200m and 10km - where in this size range there is an abundance of evidence that nearly every object is bound primarily by self-gravity with significant void space or bulk porosity between irregularly shaped constituent particles. The understanding of this population is derived from wide-ranging population studies of derived shape and spin, decades of observational studies in numerous wavelengths, evidence left behind from impacts on planets and moons and the in situ study of a few objects via spacecraft flyby or rendezvous. The internal structure, however, which is responsible for the name rubble pile, is never directly observed, but belies a violent history. Many or most of the asteroids on near-Earth orbits, and the ones most accessible for rendezvous and in situ study, are likely byproducts of the continued collisional evolution of the Main Asteroid Belt.


Here's one that's potentially dangerous, also a collection of pieces:

Potentially Dangerous Asteroid Is Actually a Pile of Rubble

In the past decade, scientists have confirmed that many asteroids are not solid rocks, but are instead cosmic rubble piles made up of jumbles of rocks. Researchers typically suggest that these asteroids stay together due to gravity pulling them into clusters and friction locking them in place.

Asteroid 1950 DA is covered with sandy particles known as regolith


So if it's a rubble pile, and it's already in pieces that are just loosely bound like that, no need for water jets to make pieces, since pieces are already there, but what to do with the pieces? I think it's better to not separate the pieces, leave them together, and use something like a gravity tractor to move all the pieces together, which may work on rubble piles if they aren't too big.


If an approaching asteroid were detected early enough, it could be possible to divert its path using the gravity of a spacecraft. Instead of sending an impactor to ram into an approaching object, a gravity tractor device would fly alongside the asteroid for a long period of time (years to decades) and slowly pull it out of Earth’s path. Gravity tractors would be most likely to work on any shape or composition of approaching asteroid, even if it were just a pile of rubble.



originally posted by: SaturnFX
better to just send a rocket up with a thruster to push it out of the way...assuming you can land on the asteroid...the further out the better as it would require less fuel, but of course, the harder it would be to target it to begin with.
If it's a rubble pile as many are, pushing on it could be a bad idea if it could break the object into pieces, because then you have multiple objects to deal with, instead of just one loosely bound rubble pile.

edit on 2019102 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 01:02 AM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Itokawa looks like a Guild Navigator. Sort of.


(God that was a terrible movie. Lynch butchered the story. Frickin "weirding modules.")



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 02:32 AM
link   
a reply to: Ophiuchus 13




Pull drone group or crafts near P.I.O and cut at engineer approved points


Let me get this straight, engineers will have close up view of the moving asteroid to make precise calculations?

Carry on



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 12:28 PM
link   
No, the engineers and scientist will use the data that is similar to data used to launch and land on asteroids like the Hayabusa2 spacecraft did.

I don't recall mentioning a close up view?

a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 12:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

Read the "Troy Rising" series by John Ringo. The story is OK, the Physics is dead on.

www.baen.com...



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 03:36 PM
link   
a reply to: Ophiuchus 13
Cool idea, but how do we get the asteroid into a water jet here? We need to build a huge one, and a good water source.
As soon as it impacted, we can start building one around it.




top topics



 
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join