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Cali to allow college athletes to be paid

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posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
Well let's be honest here.
Many colleges are actually football stadium with schools attached.....


Which is why it's a joke that the school and it's employees are the only ones who can make money. It's goddamn ridiculous that typically the highest paid person on each state's budget is the effing football coach.

Let the athletes sell their brand like everyone else can, if it screws up the paradigm even better.




posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: hyperlexic

I know what you're saying but I think you are overestimating the amount of endorsement money available for women's sports.

Jenny finch, cat osterman,
They made good cash after college on endorsements.
There just isn't that much money left over for anyone else...

That's why I say they need paid a stipend by the schools.



posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: hyperlexic

The NFL is ruined. If you start paying college players, they might not be trying as hard anymore. College is still enjoyable because the players are trying to get to that next level for the money. There, they'll begin to face away for the most part because they got a huge sum of money.



posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: hyperlexic

originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: hyperlexic

Because they knew what they were getting when they signed on. Playing for 4 years at Stanford would pay off $310,280 in your schooling. Everyone else who is working through college will be paying that back for a long long time. This is another can of worms that will kill college football as we know it.

When the sport dies, "It sounded like a good idea at the time" isn't going to bring it back...


It will never ruin the sport . There is more than enough money to go around. They are handing out 100 million dollar contracts like candy in the NFL and it hasnt ruined that league at all.

The rich guys swore it would ruin it though if they had to share.


The NFL is ruined. If you start paying college players, they might not be trying as hard anymore. College is still enjoyable because the players are trying to get to that next level for the money. There, they'll begin to face away for the most part because they got a huge sum of money.



posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: LSU2018

originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: Bluntone22

Very stupid. Only California would make a move this stupid. They'll be in violation of NCAA rules and not allowed to play in any bowl games once this takes effect. I'm 99.9% sure every game they play in the regular season will be forfeited as well.

You said not to bring up the scholarship, but that's tens of thousands of dollars PER semester that's paid for. That should be more than enough.


So should an engineering student who is also on a scholarship be prevented from taking paid internships or working part time?


Getting a scholarship for Engineering is different than a scholarship in football. Paying the players is too easy to take for granted and take advantage of. For that reason, I don't see an issue with it.

Not only that, but most of their time is spent practicing, would they have a chance to even hold a job?



If most of their time is spent practicing, then why are they even in school? In other words, they really aren't "student" athletes... just athletes that happen to play for a University.

I spent practically every waking hour studying. I barely had time for anything.

Schools already try to one up each other with the non-financial incentives so I don't really see how allowing the athletes to earn money would result in an unlevel playing field any different than it is now.


I wouldn't care if they had a job, but being paid to play would, in my opinion, rurn the sport as we know it.



posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 03:46 PM
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a reply to: hyperlexic

not when teams start avoiding talented people to save on costs and purposely tanks themselves, after a few years of being trash, talented people would start refusing california schools just because reputation alone at that point.

california probably just ruined their entire college sports future with this move because paying their players won't be profitable enough to be sustainable for most schools.



posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 03:47 PM
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originally posted by: namehere
california probably just ruined their entire college sports future with this move because paying their players won't be profitable enough to be sustainable for most schools.


Hur-dur, I didn't read the article.

California is not paying their athletes, they're allowing them rightly to go out and earn money from their brand on endorsements.



posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 03:53 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

guess i didn't read it very thoroughly did i, nevermind my previous post.



posted on Sep, 30 2019 @ 07:04 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: namehere
california probably just ruined their entire college sports future with this move because paying their players won't be profitable enough to be sustainable for most schools.


Hur-dur, I didn't read the article.

California is not paying their athletes, they're allowing them rightly to go out and earn money from their brand on endorsements.

Which is still against NCAA rules.
Cali
Always doing things against law and order.
And getting burned
Every single time



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 05:18 AM
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a reply to: Gothmog


Screw the NCAA, it's just a support system for an anti-capitalist agenda.





edit on 1-10-2019 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 06:33 AM
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I have no problem with college athletes getting some benefit from their talent. But their success is not just theirs; those coaches that people complain are paid so well? They are paid so well because they can take green talent and turn it into gold performance. All that equipment they have unlimited access to? Paid for by the school.

The money made (and there is a vast amount being made) is going to fund scholarships. Not just athletic scholarships, but academic and need-based scholarships. The money that so many seem to want pulled from the schools is the reason many kids get to go to college in the first place. People need to understand that.

The complaint about athletes being exempted from normal college standards is mostly bunk. Yeah, there may be a few exceptions, but consider this: say Joe Jones gets a scholarship at, say Notre Dame, to play football and goes into Business Management on his football scholarship, and becomes a major Notre Dame star. Now he's suddenly dreaming of all those big bucks flowing his way in the NFL. So why study? Say Joe decides screw this hard homework... I'm a star, and I'm just going to coast through life being a star. His grades start sliding. His degree is going to be meaningless. His instructors have tried to get him to straighten up, but he's made up his mind.

Now, what does the school do? Kick Joe out of school by rescinding his scholarship? Who would that help? Not Joe, and not the kids getting scholarships from money Joe is bringing in. Not the school. No one gets helped in that scenario. So the best way to help the most people is to let Joe slide as long as he does the minimum to maintain his academic standing, and get the cash. If Joe cracks a ankle in the last game of his senior year and loses his chance at the NFL, that's not the college's fault. It's Joe's fault. He could have had a good degree and just move over into management in a company somewhere, had he studied.

I have no real issue with letting these kids make some cash. My biggest concern is that these kids making sudden, unimaginable (to them) amounts of cash will go to their heads and cause them to be like Joe Jones above. No, if you want to pet kids get paid, here's how you do it:
  • The first 10% of any endorsements goes directly to the athlete, capped at, say, $5000 per product endorsed.

  • 60% goes to the University sponsoring the player, with a minimum of 90% of that to be used for non-athletic scholarships.

  • The remainder of the endorsement, with no cap, goes into a retirement/disability fund for the player. It can be accessed at retirement, if the player has a disability or disabling injury, or if the player chooses to open a business after school.
So in one fell swoop, the players can make a few bucks, secure their future and help those who do not have their inherent talent. That is a workable solution, and one I would like to see the NCAA adopt.

But that's not my issue here.

My issue is that California, as usual, thinks they are above everyone else. They think the rest of the nation should either get on board with them or get screwed. That's really what this is about... California schools want an edge in recruiting talent. When was the last time a school in California won the NCAAF championship? Better question: has a school in California ever won the NCAAF championship?

But now, if this goes as they hope, California schools will get first pick of all the talent in the country. The rest of us? Bah, who cares?

I keep hearing people from California complaining about how the rest of the country uses them for the butt of jokes. Well, right here is why; get a grip, drop the (completely undeserved) arrogance, get with the program, and maybe we'll stop.

As Burdman30ott06 pointed out early in this thread, California does not control the NCAA. If you ask me, any school which allows their athletes to accept endorsement deals under this law, in violation of NCAA rules, should be immediately disqualified for any championships or playoff spots during the season in which the violation occurred. I am even good with kicking schools completely out of the NCAA for multiple violations. Nip this in the bud, now, and nip it in the bud hard. If California wants to set their own rules, fine; they can play ball with themselves. Let's see how much endorsement cash unknown players (outside their locality) can rake in.

The sheer arrogance is what gets me. I don't pay much attention to the NFL any more, I watch college ball, for a few reasons:
  • In college ball, the players are good but not professionals. They make mistakes. The best receiver in the conference can miss a perfectly thrown ball at any time (witness Waddle dropping a TD pass in last Saturday's Bama game... no offense, Waddle, if you're reading. You're still awesome!).

  • College players aren't just in it for the money. Sure, there's that dream of joining the NFL and making boo-koo big bucks later on, but the entire push is on academics.

  • The (vast) sums of cash raised by college football are plowed back into the Universities, primarily as scholarships to make college education more available for future students. Not just athletic scholarships, but academic and need-based scholarships as well.

  • College ball is more locally prominent. By that, I mean that in the NFL, a quarterback can be playing for Oakland this week and next week be playing for Denver. College players commit to a University, and while they can switch schools, it's a lot harder to do than it is to switch employers in the NFL. NFL Draft rules are supposed to prevent this, but we all know how easy that is to break.

  • I haven't seen any washed-up wanna-be legends in their own mind using their position to make political statements in college ball.

  • The epicenter of all things football (Alabama) does not have an NFL team. What?
Now California wants to bring their male-cow-refuse-impermeated political faux-superiority to my college ball?

I don't think so.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 06:58 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Part of the problem is that California has also imposed rules on how football may be practiced out in their sainted air concerning contact among other things, and left cultists being who left cultists are, the California talent pools aren't what they used to be.

So the PAC-12 isn't what it used to be when it comes to football, and California being what it is, a giant sucking black hole for money, they need new taxpayers. This proposal nets both, hopefully greedy outside football talent from states that still allow their little boys to play rough and tumble and a slight source of tax revenue for the state from kids dumb enough not to realize the high rate of taxes California will take off the top of any endorsement deal.



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 07:04 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
The money made (and there is a vast amount being made) is going to fund scholarships. Not just athletic scholarships, but academic and need-based scholarships. The money that so many seem to want pulled from the schools is the reason many kids get to go to college in the first place. People need to understand that.


The money made typically goes to other sports teams of the college and their athletes as this example from Michigan, one of the most profitable colleges in terms of sports revenue, shows:


So, the short answer of where it all goes is that Michigan’s football revenue (along with surpluses from men’s basketball, men’s ice hockey and men’s lacrosse) goes to support two dozen other teams and nearly 650 other student athletes. Source



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 07:17 AM
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If you start paying college players, they might not be trying as hard anymore.


The general idea is that the best players names are to be associated with the brand and get money. People buy from the company identifed with the best players. Lazy players get left behind.



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

That's about normal. When I say "athletic scholarships," I should have said "football scholarships." In Alabama, football is King, Queen, Prince, Princess, and Court Jester (aka Auburn).

Revenue Destinations for the University of Alabama from AL.com

Still, that link shows $15 million going to non-athletic uses. That's a lot of money for those who don't help make it, and refutes this idea that football revenues only go to football.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 07:42 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

The problem is that California has imposed so many rules on their own citizens that they now have to try and impose rules on the other states as well. It's become their major export.

When I was driving a truck, it was understood that if one got a load to Southern California, one had better start looking for a load out yesterday. It wasn't unusual for a driver to be stuck for literally weeks at a time waiting to find a load out. The northern half of the state produces things (primarily agriculture, which typically requires 'reefers' to haul), but Southern California has become a consumer rather than a producer economy. The only real hope for drivers stuck in Southern California is to get a load coming in from overseas, and even a large number of those are coming in through more northern ports now.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 07:58 AM
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a reply to: roadgravel


Lazy players get left behind.

It's not about lazy.

Each sport has its own requirements. To be a top basketball player, one needs height and speed and strength. To be a track champion, one needs speed and stamina. To excel in football, one needs size, strength, and toughness. Not everyone has those qualities.

When I was of a sports-playing age, I was 6'-2" tall... plenty for basketball, but I was not coordinated enough and didn't have the speed. I played non-varsity football... I was tough enough, but I didn't have the weight and speed needed to make the varsity team. I was never going to become a football or basketball star. It wasn't about laziness, but physical attributes. No one has full control over their physicality. It's the luck of the draw.

There is also a lot of luck involved. Players who get the most play time get the most attention. Players who happen to be in the right place at the right time to score that winning score get more play time. There is also the aspect of corruption... the players more open to giving kickbacks would, in all likelihood, get more play time so the coaches can get kickbacks easier.

Saying it's to combat laziness is a cop-out.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

It's a combination of genetics and psychology and a bit of luck.

I was lucky enough to get good coaching added to fortunate genetics and I had a killer instinct and the drive to win.

You also have to land under the eyes of the coaches who might eventually recruit you in some way which also takes some luck.

Laziness alone won't sink you if you never had it to begin with.



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 08:23 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Agreed.


TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 1 2019 @ 08:24 AM
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I heard through a friend that the NCAA has an internal memo going around talking about not sanctioning any Cali team that has players that are getting cash from this, effectively kicking them out of any NCAA tournament and none of the games counting if they play a sanctioned NCAA team.


( this is a joke) but I can see it happening.. and I was making fun of the WB laws..




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