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Russia has admitted it knows what happened with drill hole in ISS - But it's a state secret

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posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 01:36 PM
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A suspicious hole in a Soyuz spacecraft vented air from the International Space Station.

Now, it’s the centre of a new rift between the United States and Russia.

It was only 2mm wide — but the hole had been carefully concealed. It had been plugged with a resin that slowly disintegrated in the cold dryness of space and was hidden in a corner, beneath a lining of insulation.




‘Nasty surprise’: Russia goes silent on mysterious drill hole in International Space Station

Roscosmos says it knows for sure how the drill hole got in the ISS. But will not tell because it is a state secret.

If Russia decides to stop giving the US rides (for cash) to the ISS there is not much NASA could do. I can't believe the US has gone this long without the ability to send humans to low Earth orbit. Makes you think maybe there really is a secret space program.


edit on 29-9-2019 by LookingAtMars because: add pic




posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 01:50 PM
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Well, it's a Russian capsule, so let them keep their secret. No big deal. You do know SpaceX will be launching astronauts before the end of this year, right? So Falcon 9 to the rescue.



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
Well, it's a Russian capsule, so let them keep their secret. No big deal. You do know SpaceX will be launching astronauts before the end of this year, right? So Falcon 9 to the rescue.


I sure hope so.

And maybe Bigelow will soon deploy it's hab's. Then the US can have their very own safe place in space.



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

The Russians aren't exact famous for their build quality and safety measures.
We may never know how many cosmonauts they killed in the early years.

Wonder why they patched a 2mm hole with epoxy?
I have pop rivets in my workshop that would work better than epoxy..



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

That is why your country buys rocket engines from them, right?



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 02:31 PM
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a reply to: Oleandra88

No, thats because politicians destroyed nasa...



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22
So NASA is the only rocket engine builder in the USA? Give the Russians some credit, they have their fields where they are very good.

Rocket engines for example. Not exactly low tech. That is where the saying comes from "It does not take a rocket scientist to figure out..".

But yeah, Russia bad.
edit on 29-9-2019 by Oleandra88 because: I came back to correct a wrong, see further down the page.



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: Oleandra88

Where did I say Russia was bad?
They have done some great things over the years.
But
They have a terrible record within their space program for loss of life.
Their nuclear industry does to..
Want to talk about their submarine force and the issues they had with build quality?



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 02:52 PM
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Now, it’s the centre of a new rift between the United States and Russia.


Interesting repercussion of these new findings. So why would it cause problems between these two nations? Sounds like Russia is on to the United States secret space games.

Having the hole drilled from the inside is a safer way to make sure the hole does not hit anything important on the way through. Was tucked away in a sneaky little spot that would not of been found unless they had to look for it.

So why would America do that? Have a little back door for some tiny bugs? Maybe some experiments? Maybe as a way to interfere with the internal atmosphere of the cabin? Once you know the hole is there could just pull up in a stealthy space ship, quietly do you thing and on your way again. Hmm...

edit on 29-9-2019 by kwakakev because: format



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22
I will not edit it away because see the confusion in another thread where someone did smth like that. But you never said that, I am wrong on that one, yes. It was the impression I got from your message.

I apologize.



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: Oleandra88

No worries..



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 03:28 PM
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I can’t imagine that any astronaut would do that to there own ship while in space but who knows. Could it be that one of the Russians sabotaged it in order to halt Americans from hitching a ride to the ISS by framing them? My money’s on it was someone on the ground that did this. I do believe it was deliberate though and not a random manufacturing oops. Bizarre nonetheless.



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: mtnshredder
I can’t imagine that any astronaut would do that to there own ship while in space but who knows. Could it be that one of the Russians sabotaged it in order to halt Americans from hitching a ride to the ISS by framing them? My money’s on it was someone on the ground that did this. I do believe it was deliberate though and not a random manufacturing oops. Bizarre nonetheless.

Could have been someone like that guy at American Airlines that sabotaged an aircraft just to get overtime. Stupid, I know, but that's the reality we live in.



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: LogicalGraphitti

originally posted by: mtnshredder
I can’t imagine that any astronaut would do that to there own ship while in space but who knows. Could it be that one of the Russians sabotaged it in order to halt Americans from hitching a ride to the ISS by framing them? My money’s on it was someone on the ground that did this. I do believe it was deliberate though and not a random manufacturing oops. Bizarre nonetheless.

Could have been someone like that guy at American Airlines that sabotaged an aircraft just to get overtime. Stupid, I know, but that's the reality we live in.

Yes, that was along the lines I was thinking exactly. Something malicious but for reasons IDK?
edit on 29-9-2019 by mtnshredder because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 04:13 PM
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a reply to: mtnshredder



Something malicious but for reasons IDK?


Not necessarily. If it was done as part of a secret space program project it could of be done on the sly to help keep top secret data secret. Snooping is likely, adding something to the cabin to help the astronauts is a possibility.

If the motive was malicious then a much better job could of been done.



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 05:58 PM
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Pfft...it was a Russian laser weapon that got pinted at the wrong target. Pretty obvious.



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: kwakakev
Having the hole drilled from the inside is a safer way to make sure the hole does not hit anything important on the way through. Was tucked away in a sneaky little spot that would not of been found unless they had to look for it.

So why would America do that? Have a little back door for some tiny bugs? Maybe some experiments? Maybe as a way to interfere with the internal atmosphere of the cabin? Once you know the hole is there could just pull up in a stealthy space ship, quietly do you thing and on your way again. Hmm...


I think it's more likely a Russian technician drilled a hole where he wasn't supposed to while assembling the capsule, didn't tell anyone, and tried to cover it up (figuratively and literally).

If the Russians investigated and found out this was the case, then they would likely want to keep the details quiet because quality control issues such as this make their program look bad.


edit on 9/29/2019 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

Also Boeing Starliner is completing final test flights and will be shuttling astronauts and cargo to ISS



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 07:25 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
Well, it's a Russian capsule, so let them keep their secret. No big deal. You do know SpaceX will be launching astronauts before the end of this year, right? So Falcon 9 to the rescue.


[Note: "Fireresue" beat me to this, but I'm posting anyhow
]

And Boeing will be relatively close behind launching their CST-100 Starliner.

SpaceX's scheduled first manned test flight is (for now) set for November 15 of this year. Boeing's first manned test flight is said to be no earlier than December of this year, but that seems unlikely because they haven't even launched an unmanned test yet (that unmanned test for Boeing is tentatively set for next month). Both companies have been having problems holding to their schedules, so even SpaceX's announced date of November 15 might not happen.

SpaceX tentatively set their first manned test flight for 2018, then it slipped to April of this year, and then it slipped to July of this year, and then it slipped again after the explosion of an unmanned version of SpaceX's manned capsule during a test firing after it returned from a mission. It is now set for November, but who knows if it might slip again.

Boeing's schedule has slipped as well. They, too, once said their spacecraft would be ready for manned missions by 2018, but then last year they said the first manned test launch of the Starliner would be in August 2019. However, other issues caused a delay of at least 6 months, which puts the first manned Boeing Starline launch into 2020.

On the bright side, even with all the delays from both SpaceX and Boeing, it does seem that both will have operational spacecraft in the near future for ferrying astronauts to the space station, giving the U.S. at least two options.

Boeing CST-100 Starliner

SpaceX Dragon2


edit on 9/29/2019 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 07:30 PM
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Why does the headline say "Hole in the ISS?"




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