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Hubble photo captures more than 265,000 galaxies in one image

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posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 05:37 PM
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www.technologyreview.com...
May 13, 2019

This Hubble photo captures more than 265,000 galaxies in one image




The image mosaic was created using 16 years’ worth of data from the Hubble Space Telescope, and it shows roughly 265,000 galaxies stretching back 13.3 billion years, to just 500 million years after the Big Bang. Background: This isn’t the first Hubble deep-field image. The first one was released back in 1995, with further deep-field images following in 2003, 2004, and 2012. However, this is by far the most comprehensive. It was created by weaving together several of the previous Hubble photos. The image, dubbed the Hubble Legacy Field, represents 7,500 separate exposures. It contains about 30 times as many galaxies as the previous shots.


Fascinating. Gotta wonder how many suns/solar systems in those galaxies each and combines. Where has Hubble been perusing all these years anyways. Apparently its a Satellite and has been in space for nearly 30 years already and has things like its gyroscope break but somehow they get it fixed remotely. Will it last another 30 years? Where is it right now, anyways? Does it ever get images of earth, too?

gizmodo.com...



Have you seen this photo of Earth from the perspective of the Hubble telescope? Well, it’s 100 percent fake. It’s a stunning image, but it’s actually computer generated. And there’s still some confusion over who first created it.






posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: letni

How can we see 265,000 galaxies? Is there a way to blow up the photo?



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 05:46 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

At the scale of this image every point of light will be a galaxy.



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 05:47 PM
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Good question. Maybe ATS expert Phage knows.

Paging Dr Phage..



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

There's a link to the image in image on the Hubble site in the article.
hubblesite.org...
Blow the pic up and you can see the shape of quite a few galaxies.



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 06:00 PM
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Just go to the site mentioned in the article, here is the link

hubblesite.org...

Then select the full size image on the bottom left, have to warn you it is 927mb in size

Here is the direct link to the full resolution image

imgsrc.hubblesite.org...



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: letni

Nope. Sorry. I just counted them all. Twice.

There are exactly 264,998 galaxies in that photo.




posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 06:38 PM
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originally posted by: ABNARTY
a reply to: letni

Nope. Sorry. I just counted them all. Twice.

There are exactly 264,998 galaxies in that photo.



Are you an excellent driver?




posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: Oraculi

I am an excellent driver. An excellent driver. AND counter.



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 07:09 PM
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There is a lot of empty space in space.



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: letni

The sad thing is most of those galaxies are already dead.

In six billion years our Sun will fizzle out, those stars are twice as old as Sol, the weird thing is that we don't see as many supernovae as we should be.



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 08:08 PM
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[Small version of image referenced in the OP]

I'll say the same thing about this image that I said about the similar "Hubble Deep Filed Image". It's wild to think about this image from a different perspective, but figuratively and literally.

Let's imagine you are an alien in a galaxy half way across the universe looking at their own similar version of this in which our Milky Way galaxy might appear. Our entire galaxy -- billions of stars -- might be just one of those very dim single pixel dots (and there are thousands of single-pixel dots in that image).

that alien likely would not even take any notice of our galaxy. We would just be lost in the noise.

So if we now look at our version at all those tiny little dots, we too would likely not even take notice of the little dot of a galaxy from which that alien was looking.


edit on 9/26/2019 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 08:15 PM
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The wider view contains about 30 times as many galaxies as in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, taken in 2004. The new portrait, a mosaic of multiple snapshots, covers almost the width of the full Moon.

hubblesite.org...

Almost the width of the full Moon. The full Moon is about 1/2 degree across. You can cover it with the tip of your little finger held at arm's length. It is a tiny bit of the whole sky.

Space is big.
edit on 9/26/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 09:07 PM
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it looks like the Hayden Planetarium finally got a big upgrade!



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