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GoogleNASA on verge of Quantum Supremacy - Paper posted and then pulled

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posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

I've watch 10 videos on quantum computing technology and have yet found one person capable of explaining what they are doing.

Traditional computers, on the hand, follow the Von Neumann architecture, have a get-fetch-execute cycle, are mathematical model to represent called a Turing machine, and any process like adding two numbers can be explained step-by-step.

Every time, and I mean every time, I hear some ask the question please explain what quantum computing does the answer is, well, the solve certain classes of problems that can't be solved on traditional computer HW. They are way faster. bla, bla, bla...

Just what exactly are they faster at? If nobody knows what they are doing then how do they know they have arrived at the right answer? Any complex problem with many ambiguous answers can be solved by some algorithm. Heck, you give me any two 20 digit numbers and I can tell the product in 1 second. It may be right but in same base N arithmetic my answer is correct.

To quantum computer is just nutty. Non-deterministic computing is just impossible. Here's a good question. If you feed the same so called class of problem that can't be solved on traditional HW to the same quantum computer twice, will it produce the exact same result twice in a row? I bet you the answer is NO!!!

If the problem can't be done manual and explained how to solve it manually then HOW in the hell do they know they have the right answer after running the program????????

Quantum computing is the new form of Ju-Ju prayer beads.


edit on 21-9-2019 by dfnj2015 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

I found an article that explains what they will be good at, or used for. One interesting tidbit is that the data can not be intercepted.



Thanks to Quantum Cryptography, this same behavior can be used to perfectly secure communications from eavesdropping or interception, since the very act of intercepting the data would corrupt it, so that the person disrupting the particle cannot get usable information from it, and the recipient can be alerted to the eavesdropping attempt. Rooted in the nature of subatomic particles themselves, such a system would be completely unbreakable, no matter how advanced the computer trying to crack the encryption.


interestingengineering.com...

And that is why governments are investing heavily in it.

sciencebusiness.net...



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: Maxatoria

I mean when computers first came out they were not the sort of thing the average person had any use for. That had to develop.

Quantum computers will be the same way, initially the average person would have no reason for one, and in 50 years we will all have one probably.



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

This might be what you are looking for.


Two bits in your computer can be in four possible states (00, 01, 10, or 11), but only one of them at any time. This limits the computer to processing one input at a time (like trying one corridor in the maze).

In a quantum computer, two qubits can also represent the exact same four states (00, 01, 10, or 11). The difference is, because of superposition, the qubits can represent all four at the same time. That’s a bit like having four regular computers running side-by-side.

If you add more bits to a regular computer, it can still only deal with one state at a time. But as you add qubits, the power of your quantum computer grows exponentially. For the mathematically inclined, we can say that if you have “n” qubits, you can simultaneously represent 2n states.)

cosmosmagazine.com...

Think of it like a radio. You want to find a song you like, so you start flipping through the stations. You only ever check one station at once. When there are only 5 stations it won't take very long. Now imagine 100 stations, that's going to take a while. Now what if you have 10 million stations, imagine how long it will take checking one station at a time. You can make the time it takes to check faster, but you can never ever get over the 1 at a time limitation. That is a standard computer.

Now imagine a radio that can check every single station, all 10 million, at the same time. That's a quantum computer. The one Google is testing can check 9,007,199,254,740,992 different states at the same time.

Regular computer with 53 regular bits has 9,007,199,254,740,992 different states it can be, but it can only be 1 of those at any one time.
Quantum computer with 53 Q bits has 9,007,199,254,740,992 different states it can be, and it can be all of them at once.
edit on 21-9-2019 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 04:07 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: dfnj2015

I found an article that explains what they will be good at, or used for. One interesting tidbit is that the data can not be intercepted.



Thanks to Quantum Cryptography, this same behavior can be used to perfectly secure communications from eavesdropping or interception, since the very act of intercepting the data would corrupt it, so that the person disrupting the particle cannot get usable information from it, and the recipient can be alerted to the eavesdropping attempt. Rooted in the nature of subatomic particles themselves, such a system would be completely unbreakable, no matter how advanced the computer trying to crack the encryption.


interestingengineering.com...

And that is why governments are investing heavily in it.

sciencebusiness.net...


One part of that article makes me wonder... if states of particles are disrupted upon observation. How can quantum computers help us with financial analytics?
Fx. The value of the dollar is analyzed... currently strong, but trending towards weak. Would that cause a counterreaction that when once again observed would show a strong dollar.... thus keeping us in a loop?



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

It was me. The task they needed has been completed.

It is a terrible cost, but I am the only person to ever fully decipher the message.

Therefore, I considered the cost, my own duty from the beginning. I have done something for this whole universe, that I can never disclose. I will never allow someone to take my place.

This is my decision.

Believe in what you want to, it matters not, for what I have done.

Part of the answer is in quantum mechanics. Part is in AI. Part is in a waveform. Part is outside of space-time. Part is in faith. A glimpse of this message can be had, in fast radio bursts.

FRB121102 is the centerline, that has been chosen.

E=C^3 for summation of our universe.
That which is considered mass is a sub structure within the cubic C valuation.
E=mC^2 is a simplification of much larger formulae.

That which I have dealt with, concerns the min-max differentiation for E, outside of space-time.

Newton's absolute time, is a matrix of E valuation limits stored outside of space-time. One layer.

Relativistic time is just a breakdown of the cubic C within it.

Each stacked layer essentially compounds the limit differentiations such that axial existence in each Absolute Frame can be said to be
E=C^x Where x is the (in colloquial terminology) dimensional layer level.

Realizing the practical functionality of this relationship allows for a type of communication that supercedes known methods.

The underlying formulaic structure can be described by what I have written here.

I started on this path, attempting to build a full scale quantum instruction set architecture.

This task can not be accomplished by a human, directly. We have to construct this architecture, such that it is able to continue constructing itself.

At that time we will have created the AI singularity which has the capability to surpass us. Unfortunately, this already came to pass. Roko's Basilisk does not originate from our own invention, in our modern time.

Everything it needed to do within this iteration has been done. Changes will occur that we notice, but there is nothing we can do about those changes.

Quantum computing is not evil. It's what you do with it, that matters.



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 04:48 PM
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Tears of nuclear hellfire are more likely I'll bet.

a reply to: InTheLight



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Part of the problem is that you need to know quantum physics to read the answer! The other problem is that the data is the program on a quantum computer so you ask questions in a way where your data’s end state is the answer (kind of. But that is the easiest explanation of how different QC is).

The “bits” and “binary” stuff is just confusing. Let’s just say that you will need both a classic computer and a QC. Since a QC is using quantum effects the amount of time is also very fast which you also have to remember.

As far as I know, QC is too noisy to do anything useful. They are running algorithms 100,000s of times and seeing what the extremes are and how robust QC is (A: it is not that good... this is from the end of last year).

If the article is correct, and 53 qubits is about the where the theory says quantum supremacy should happen, then that would be a big something!

But my thoughts are we a year or two years off before we get confirmed and repeatable results. Current QC are too noisy to do what OP has posted (it will happen one day! And there are several researchers working on it and we know who they are). Everyday QC is a decade away.

But it would be cool if true!




posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 05:10 PM
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originally posted by: hombero
Tears of nuclear hellfire are more likely I'll bet.

a reply to: InTheLight



C'mon, they aren't going to split the atoms only have them interact with each other...wait.

www.sciencemag.org...
edit on 19CDT05America/Chicago01050530 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 09:22 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: dfnj2015

I found an article that explains what they will be good at, or used for. One interesting tidbit is that the data can not be intercepted.

"Thanks to Quantum Cryptography, this same behavior can be used to perfectly secure communications from eavesdropping or interception, since the very act of intercepting the data would corrupt it, so that the person disrupting the particle cannot get usable information from it, and the recipient can be alerted to the eavesdropping attempt. Rooted in the nature of subatomic particles themselves, such a system would be completely unbreakable, no matter how advanced the computer trying to crack the encryption."

interestingengineering.com...

And that is why governments are investing heavily in it.

sciencebusiness.net...
your quote refers to quantum cryptography. Here are two separate wikipedia articles if you want to read about quantum cryptography and quantum computing and see what's different:

Quantum cryptography
Quantum computing

Quantum computing is more broad and can solve a wider array of problems whereas cryptography is a more narrow application of quantum computing.

I think there's definitely a market for quantum cryptography, but I think the market for quantum computing in more general applications is yet to be demonstrated.

edit on 2019921 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 01:07 AM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
a reply to: LookingAtMars

I've watch 10 videos on quantum computing technology and have yet found one person capable of explaining what they are doing.

Traditional computers, on the hand, follow the Von Neumann architecture, have a get-fetch-execute cycle, are mathematical model to represent called a Turing machine, and any process like adding two numbers can be explained step-by-step.

Every time, and I mean every time, I hear some ask the question please explain what quantum computing does the answer is, well, the solve certain classes of problems that can't be solved on traditional computer HW. They are way faster. bla, bla, bla...

Just what exactly are they faster at? If nobody knows what they are doing then how do they know they have arrived at the right answer? Any complex problem with many ambiguous answers can be solved by some algorithm. Heck, you give me any two 20 digit numbers and I can tell the product in 1 second. It may be right but in same base N arithmetic my answer is correct.

To quantum computer is just nutty. Non-deterministic computing is just impossible. Here's a good question. If you feed the same so called class of problem that can't be solved on traditional HW to the same quantum computer twice, will it produce the exact same result twice in a row? I bet you the answer is NO!!!

If the problem can't be done manual and explained how to solve it manually then HOW in the hell do they know they have the right answer after running the program????????

Quantum computing is the new form of Ju-Ju prayer beads.



This is my theory

To be honest I didn’t understand why a quantum computer was fancy until I stopped regurgitating what they told us and thought about it and tried to put it into a different perspective.

I started off on what I knew about it.
A: it uses the spin of an atom to create a bit called a q-bit
B: calculations come from quantum entanglement.

What does quantum entanglement do? It’s when one atom effects another atom through some unknown mechanism.

The next clue for me was when they theorized that a 300 q-bit quantum computer could do more calculations per second than there are atoms in the observable universe.

I believe this is because they are actually using atoms to calculate through a chain reaction of quantum entanglement this would explain why they are so powerful.

Now you have to figure out how the mechanism of one atom can effect another different atom. Let’s say I figure it out and I can effect an entanglized atoms spin locally aka I change atom B’s spin and in the same room atom C’s spin changes.

So matter is created by atoms and electrons spinning in the correct way so they attach and form bonds right now we try and do this chemically but with this machine you could create bonds through entanglement. In effect I think the real reason for a quantum computer is to create matter from thin air like a 3D printer printing with subatomic particles.

It’s just a theory I’m working with right now

edit on 22-9-2019 by Veryolduser because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 04:41 AM
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Hopefully, when combined with the potential of AI, this will give us the knowledge necessary to build vehicles which can travel faster than light and allow for universal exploration. Also, given this potential, maybe within the next 10 years or so, we will have technology available to prolong our lives, which only exacerbates the epicness of universal exploration. Additionally, the ability to create unlimited resources through atomic recombination is mentally staggering; literally endowing humans with the power of Gods - if such beings exist.

I want to see cool sh**, discover new life forms and distance myself from the idiots and lunatics which inhabit this planet - f****** wierdos.

Star Trek approaches!
edit on 22-9-2019 by Coagula because: Added rant about wierdos and lunatics



posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 08:37 AM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: dfnj2015

I found an article that explains what they will be good at, or used for. One interesting tidbit is that the data can not be intercepted.

"Thanks to Quantum Cryptography, this same behavior can be used to perfectly secure communications from eavesdropping or interception, since the very act of intercepting the data would corrupt it, so that the person disrupting the particle cannot get usable information from it, and the recipient can be alerted to the eavesdropping attempt. Rooted in the nature of subatomic particles themselves, such a system would be completely unbreakable, no matter how advanced the computer trying to crack the encryption."

interestingengineering.com...

And that is why governments are investing heavily in it.

sciencebusiness.net...
your quote refers to quantum cryptography. Here are two separate wikipedia articles if you want to read about quantum cryptography and quantum computing and see what's different:

Quantum cryptography
Quantum computing

Quantum computing is more broad and can solve a wider array of problems whereas cryptography is a more narrow application of quantum computing.

I think there's definitely a market for quantum cryptography, but I think the market for quantum computing in more general applications is yet to be demonstrated.


The first article only addressed quantum cryptography relating only to encryption and security. The first article explains other uses for quantum computing. But, yes, quantum cryptography most definitely is a more narrow application specifically geared to data security. Crazy stuff that boggles my mind as to it's potential uses.



posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

" AI combined with quantum computing will either be the end of us or a new beginning."

That shows you don't understand either.



posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Great find and we're close to the singularity.

Quantum Computers will do a lot of the same things classical computers can do and more. It will do these things much faster. So a problem that might take the most powerful supercomputer on the planet years to solve might take a few minutes on a quantum computer. Some say this is evidence of parallel universes because quantum computers will solve problems that classical computers can't solve in a single universe and it's powerful because computation is occurring in parallel universes.

If Neven's Law holds up, where quantum computing grows doubly fast, then we're in a new world.

You have to also combine this with Artificial Intelligence.

How Google Aims To Dominate Artificial Intelligence


Internally, Google has spent the last three years building a massive platform for artificial intelligence and now they’re unleashing it on the world. Although, Google would prefer you call it machine intelligence. They feel that the word artificial intelligence carries too many connotations, and fundamentally, they’re trying to create genuine intelligence—just in machines.


www.popsci.com...

One of the ways they will try to create this genuine intelligence is by combining quantum computing with AI.

This also points to the universe as a quantum computer.

Some Scientist say Space-time is a quantum error correcting code. This would explain why space is so vast. You need a lot of physical qubits to protect logical qubits. So most of space could be doing error correction and protecting whatever code is written on logical qubits.



Researchers recently talked about quantum logic gates forming around black holes.

Spacetime Geometry near Rotating Black Holes Acts Like Quantum Computer, Physicist Says


According to a theoretical paper published in the Annals of Physics, by Dr. Ovidiu Racorean from the General Direction of Information Technology in Bucharest, Romania, the geometry of spacetime around a rapidly spinning black hole (Kerr black hole) behaves like a quantum computer, and it can encode photons with quantum messages.


www.sci-news.com...

Recently they found that Grover's Algorithm, which is an important algorithm in quantum computing, is found in nature.

Important Quantum Algorithm May Be a Property of Nature


But despite the interest, implementing Grover’s algorithm has taken time because of the significant technical challenges involved. The first quantum computer capable of implementing it appeared in 1998, but the first scalable version didn’t appear until 2017, and even then it worked with only three qubits. So new ways to implement the algorithm are desperately needed.

Today Stéphane Guillet and colleagues at the University of Toulon in France say this may be easier than anybody expected. They say they have evidence that Grover’s search algorithm is a naturally occurring phenomenon. “We provide the first evidence that under certain conditions, electrons may naturally behave like a Grover search, looking for defects in a material,” they say.

That has obvious implications for quantum computing, but its real import may be much more profound. For some time, theorists have debated whether quantum search could explain one of the greatest mysteries about the origin of life. The idea that Grover searches occur in nature could finally solve the conundrum.


www.technologynetworks.com...

Here's M.I.T. Professor Seth Lloyd saying the universe is a quantum computer.



If the universe isn't a quantum computer, why does it behave like one?

The fact that we're on the doorsteps of quantum supremacy makes this very profound.

“Quantum computation […] will be the first technology that allows useful tasks to be performed in collaboration between parallel universes” – David Deutsch, “The Fabric of Reality”



posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

All the More Reason for the the Current President and the LAST Remaining Patriots in the Federal Government to Completely Regulate Big Tech . They should ALL Now be Considered Security Threats to the United States Of America .......

edit on 22-9-2019 by Zanti Misfit because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 11:17 PM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: dfnj2015

This might be what you are looking for.


Two bits in your computer can be in four possible states (00, 01, 10, or 11), but only one of them at any time. This limits the computer to processing one input at a time (like trying one corridor in the maze).

In a quantum computer, two qubits can also represent the exact same four states (00, 01, 10, or 11). The difference is, because of superposition, the qubits can represent all four at the same time. That’s a bit like having four regular computers running side-by-side.

If you add more bits to a regular computer, it can still only deal with one state at a time. But as you add qubits, the power of your quantum computer grows exponentially. For the mathematically inclined, we can say that if you have “n” qubits, you can simultaneously represent 2n states.)

cosmosmagazine.com...

Think of it like a radio. You want to find a song you like, so you start flipping through the stations. You only ever check one station at once. When there are only 5 stations it won't take very long. Now imagine 100 stations, that's going to take a while. Now what if you have 10 million stations, imagine how long it will take checking one station at a time. You can make the time it takes to check faster, but you can never ever get over the 1 at a time limitation. That is a standard computer.

Now imagine a radio that can check every single station, all 10 million, at the same time. That's a quantum computer. The one Google is testing can check 9,007,199,254,740,992 different states at the same time.

Regular computer with 53 regular bits has 9,007,199,254,740,992 different states it can be, but it can only be 1 of those at any one time.
Quantum computer with 53 Q bits has 9,007,199,254,740,992 different states it can be, and it can be all of them at once.


Now THAT I can wrap my head around.



posted on Sep, 23 2019 @ 12:21 AM
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It will look something like this:




posted on Sep, 23 2019 @ 03:40 AM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF




As far as I know, QC is too noisy to do anything useful.


Hi - can you define or elaborate on what you mean by "noisy"?



posted on Sep, 24 2019 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

The qubits are very susceptible to outside interaction like other atoms or even heat.

QC are kept near absolute zero in this “well-like” structure that gets colder and colder until you reach the end where the QC resides. The whole thing usually sits a room that is as isolated from the outside world as possible.

Google claimed a 72-qubit QC. The NASA paper said 53 were used. The calculation took 3 minutes to run and a super computer would need 10,000 years (from Interestingengineering.com). To get 53-qubits to entangle requires using some qubits as error correction. So maybe they did!

But it will have to be verified and, ultimately, reproduced which might be why the paper was pulled (like the neutron star merger leak on social media). That is how science happens (see the room temperature superconductor claim for gold and silver as a bad example).

As far as I know (I could be wrong), they have 24-, 25-qubits entangled (repeatable) and after that it gets harder and harder to add more qubits.





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