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Large Object Crashes Into The North Side Of The Moon Captured Live

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posted on Sep, 15 2019 @ 05:03 PM
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originally posted by: Creep Thumper
To my eyes, that is a fast, controlled landing.


Wait..You are talking about the video in this thread right and not something else?
YOu got a "fast , controlled landing" from that video. ¿




posted on Sep, 15 2019 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: kwakakev


Maybe it was the Indian space capsule; just a conjecture.



posted on Sep, 15 2019 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: kwakakev
a reply to: Hunkadinka



I wonder what Hubble would have shown


Never A Straight Answer is what I would expect. Hubble is supposedly not allowed to look at the moon. The reflection from the sun is too bright is what we are told. The chances of all the crashed UFOs, and alien foot prints getting out to the public is much from my perception.


Wrong!
www.nasa.gov...

Hubble Prospects For Resources on The Moon

...Now, the U.S. is planning another pioneering journey, this time to the moon and beyond. To prepare, NASA scientists are using the Hubble Space Telescope to hunt for resources, such as oxygen, that are essential for people to survive and to sustain their existence on the lunar surface. Hubble's preliminary observations and results are promising.

...

These observations weren't easy. The moon is a difficult target for Hubble because it moves across the sky faster than Hubble can track it and is very dim in ultraviolet light. The observations required steady, precise, as well as long exposures to search for the resources. In spite of these challenges, Hubble was able to image all of its targets, and early results show that Hubble can detect ilmenite at the Apollo 17 site from 248,000 miles (400,000 km) away.





posted on Sep, 15 2019 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: Advantage

originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: kwakakev

Here’s an article about a meteoroid around 10 inches wide hitting the moon...

www.theatlantic.com...

1 mile wide would be quite significant.


Wouldnt a mile wide object impact spew stuff that would cause some crazy moon ring or a chunk seized by gravity to hit the Earth? Hmm Lack of sleep making me think weird things??


You're assuming whatever it is crashed. But it looks to me sort-of a controlled descent. Hence, no spewed out debris.



posted on Sep, 15 2019 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: MrRCflying

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: kwakakev

For something apparently so large, shouldn't it have caused more disruption? Ejecta and perhaps an energetic flash?

With the absence of such, the irregularity could have been an insect flying across the aperture of the telescope or a bird, or aircraft, far off in the sky.

There is nothing to identify scale or distance of the object. The assumption that a visual disturbance in a telescope image is at the maximum focii is unfounded. There is a lot of intervening distance which can also have objects that cross the aperture.


Therein lies the problem.

1. At one mile across, you could not have seen it incoming. The moon is about 239,000 miles away. Even with a good telescope you are not going to see craters that are one mile across. Maybe some really big 2 meter plus professional observatories, not sure about that even.

2. A one mile across object would make one heck of a bang. It would make a crater probably more than 10 miles across. It would for sure be seen from earth. The impact would probably be easily seen without a telescope, and debris would be seen though scopes from all over the world for hours after, at the very least.

3. Nearly all Near Earth Asteroids that are 1KM or larger have been found and tracked in the last 20 years. I would have to look it up, but I know it is upwards of 95%. Not a chance something one mile across or larger has not been seen yet.

I call BS on this whole thing. Sounds and looks fake.


I agree that it couldn't have been that big, and that close to the Earth, yet had somehow gotten past all our monitoring.

The obvious conclusion was that it wasn't near the moon at all. The moon just happened to be in the picture.



edit on 15/9/2019 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2019 @ 07:09 AM
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originally posted by: Hunkadinka

originally posted by: Advantage

originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: kwakakev

Here’s an article about a meteoroid around 10 inches wide hitting the moon...

www.theatlantic.com...

1 mile wide would be quite significant.


Wouldnt a mile wide object impact spew stuff that would cause some crazy moon ring or a chunk seized by gravity to hit the Earth? Hmm Lack of sleep making me think weird things??


You're assuming whatever it is crashed. But it looks to me sort-of a controlled descent. Hence, no spewed out debris.


Or, the object wasn't near the moon at all, but somewhere closer to the camera and passed between the camera and the Moon.



posted on Sep, 16 2019 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

I agree...
The first clue is the telescope is out of focus and over-saturated in light, he's purposely using the wrong f-stop.. it's going to pickup insects and bugs near the scope.


edit on 16-9-2019 by CraftyArrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 02:13 PM
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Link

This image shows some graphs of what is produced by the sun in a Coronal Mass Ejection, CME. What I find interesting about it is how the pattern of the temperature, speed and density kinda match the patterns of the object hitting the moon.

Is it possible that what was captured started as a CME? Did the sun throw something at the moon? Did some of those pesky aliens living on the moon just get a can of woop ass?



posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 06:27 PM
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originally posted by: kwakakev
This image shows some graphs of what is produced by the sun in a Coronal Mass Ejection, CME. What I find interesting about it is how the pattern of the temperature, speed and density kinda match the patterns of the object hitting the moon.

The video doesn't have enough quality to do a real comparison.


Is it possible that what was captured started as a CME? Did the sun throw something at the moon? Did some of those pesky aliens living on the moon just get a can of woop ass?

I doubt it, if we are seeing the Moon's surface illuminated then it means that the light from the Sun is coming from behind us, as would any object thrown by it, not from the side.



posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 08:03 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP
a reply to: kwakakev

I don't think that's an object hitting the Moon, just something closer to the telescope that was passing in front of the Moon.

Such a large object hitting the Moon would create a clearly visible change that would have been seen by all other astronomers looking at the Moon at the time, and the supposed "explosions" would last longer than one second, as the energy involved would throw debris high and, with lower gravity, they would take longer to fall back to the Moon's surface than on Earth, and we don't see that on the video.


Instead of hitting the moon, what if the large object landed gracefully? Would that be more plausible for the lack of a large dust plume or visible debris?
edit on 18-9-2019 by Jay Electronica because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 01:50 AM
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a reply to: Jay Electronica

Considering the apparent speed of the "object", a graceful landing would need a very hard deceleration.

It's much more likely that the "object" was not close to the Moon.



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 02:07 AM
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a reply to: kwakakev

Wow.. The Moon actually moved after the Object hit the surface. Must have been massive.



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 02:13 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

Do you have any further information on how the moon moved?



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 05:19 AM
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To help clarify the pattern I see between the object hitting the moon and the progression of a solar flare I put together this image.

Solar flares are comprised of matter that is ejected by the sun. They usually take 2-3 days to get to Earth and generally have an electromagnetic charge associated to them. The stronger ones that can get through the Earth causes havoc with our electrical infrastructure. These waves can pass through matter while causing metallic objects to spark and absorb this energy by over heating.

It is unlikely that these two events are exactly related as the solar flare graph was taken in May of 2019 and the moon footage uploaded in September of 2019. For the principle that is as work to cause these types of events it is something for the suspect list.



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: kwakakev

This is what happens when you let a learner driver land the mothership..!!





posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 10:41 PM
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a reply to: Ironclad1964

Good thing they make those ships stronger than my cars then. Been through a few of them.



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