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Smart phone camera question

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posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 10:06 AM
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Regrets if this is the wrong forum. I have a question about the images produced by smart phone cameras.

Do the .jpg files produced by these cameras carry a signature that identifies the specific telephone (not type, but a unique identifier of a particular telephone) that made the image?

My guess is they do not, but may be wrong.

Cheers




posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 10:13 AM
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No they do not. The .jpg file will contain an EXIF data - that is exchangeable image file format.

The EXIF data/metadata contains info like date, time, type of device, shutter speed, etc, but it doesn’t contain a unique identifier to determine if a photo was actually taken on a person’s specific device


a reply to: F2d5thCavv2



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 10:19 AM
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a reply to: Medusa18

Thanks Medusa18.



Cheers



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 10:38 AM
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You can rest your gf didn't take that photo.



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 10:43 AM
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originally posted by: gallop
You can rest your gf didn't take that photo.



Gallop, that's good because time travel would be implied otherwise.


Cheers



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 10:54 AM
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a reply to: F2d5thCavv2

You can see this for yourself.

Simply upload the image to the website and you will see exactly what is in the EXIF data.

exif.regex.info...



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: grey580

Thanks grey580!

Cheers



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 12:00 PM
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How about the meta data?

helpdeskgeek.com...



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12
How about the meta data?

helpdeskgeek.com...


Good point, sometimes includes geolocation data.


A photo’s EXIF data contains a ton of information about your camera, and potentially where the picture was taken (GPS coordinates). That means, if you’re sharing images, there’s a lot of details others can glean from them.
howtogeek.com page

Cheers



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 02:40 PM
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Im quite sure there are hidden data in pictures. This is merely my guess.

Think steganography

My understanding and knowledge is limited. If one were to be sureish, one would need to have access to the source codes of the firmwares for the hardware in charge of taking the pictures. Right?

I would put the functionality into imaging engine, so thats the place i would look first.

I'm not sure how hard it would be to detect such extra information from the picture. I think very hard, maybe even practically impossible.



posted on Sep, 14 2019 @ 12:12 AM
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originally posted by: F2d5thCavv2

originally posted by: gallop
You can rest your gf didn't take that photo.



Gallop, that's good because time travel would be implied otherwise.


Cheers


And that still was not me in the photo !!!

I don't actually remember posting that.. I suppose. Was in deed a strange friday.



posted on Sep, 14 2019 @ 12:47 AM
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a reply to: Topelius


Im quite sure there are hidden data in pictures. This is merely my guess.


Topelius, thanks. The reason I asked the question was because it occurred to me this is done with other technologies.

Network adapters on computers have unique hardware addresses as far as I know. I believe I have also heard that laser and inkjet printers[?] (not sure if all do this) print codes on the pages they print that point to which machine produced them?


A Machine Identification Code (MIC), also known as printer steganography, yellow dots, tracking dots or secret dots, is a digital watermark which certain color laser printers and copiers leave on every single printed page, allowing identification of the device with which a document was printed and giving clues to the originator. Developed by Xerox and Canon in the mid-1980s, its existence became public only in 2004.
Machine Identification Code

Seems like a natural extension of this activity would be to "watermark" digital images somehow. As seen with the history of MIC, such "features" may not be known to the public.

Cheers


edit on 14-9-2019 by F2d5thCavv2 because: not sure about inkjets




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