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WTF? UK lawmakers physically restrain the speaker of the house to keep him from leaving.

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posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:03 AM
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My phone is being a tit but to respond to a couple of posts here... this is a FORUM. The point of this place is for people to discuss things. Hell, I see Brits and other Europeans commenting on American politics every day here. We’re not voting people into your parliament (you don’t want that), this is healthy discussion and outside opinions can be quite helpful.

That being said... is there video of this? That would help in understanding this (especially for us foreigners who are ignorant of Parliament particulars. Your words paint a picture of childish antics, that’s for sure. Not that my country’s (USA) senate isn’t full of the same nonsense.

My understanding is that Parliament is about to be prorogued, which is definitely going to trigger strong emotional outbursts (as it should). Idk about other non-UK readers, but my country doesn’t have this procedure. Could a well-informed UK poster enlighten us? I kinda get it, but the subtleties of what it means eludes me. I imagine a lot of people are in this same boat.




posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:06 AM
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Kind of shows the nature of the beast that Boris is facing whilst trying to deliver Brexit, the will of the British people.

They will do anything, absolutely anything to sabotage Brexit, they want to stay in bed with the EU.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope

No i did not vote in the UK, but we did not physically restrain nancy pelosi when she tried to take a military flight during a government shutdown. Trump simply denied access to a government funded military flight until a budget deal could be met. If a half dozen men pinned her to a chair it would be considered "assault". Thats ignorant behavior.
edit on 10-9-2019 by drewlander because: Sp



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: WorldUnderCeej



My understanding is that Parliament is about to be prorogued, which is definitely going to trigger strong emotional outbursts (as it should). Idk about other non-UK readers, but my country doesn’t have this procedure. Could a well-informed UK poster enlighten us? I kinda get it, but the subtleties of what it means eludes me. I imagine a lot of people are in this same boat.


I'm not a Brit and I'm not all that informed on Brexit, but...


True to form, his announcement on Monday that he would leave his post and his seat in Parliament came wrapped with one final rebuke for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s hard-line government. By timing his departure for the end of October, Mr. Bercow ensured that the current Parliament, packed with Johnson-averse lawmakers, would choose his successor.


www.msn.com...

So, as I understand, the conservatives are upset because, with Bercow's departure, the Labour Party will choose the new Speaker of the House, not Johnson's party.

Also, as I understand it, Brits were promised a Brexit with a deal, not a hard exit with no deal. So, some that voted for Brexit also oppose Johnson's threat of a no deal Brexit.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:19 AM
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a reply to: WorldUnderCeej
The majority of us voted in the referendum to leave the EU. The trouble is three quarters of parliament want to remain. Despite promising to honour the referendum result and leave the EU these politicians have spent the last three years plotting and scheming to delay Brexit or try to have the referendum result overturned.

They an absolute disgrace and are an embarrassment to this country.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:43 AM
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originally posted by: Aspie
a reply to: WorldUnderCeej

They an absolute disgrace and are an embarrassment to this country.

Honestly, I'm starting to wonder if there is a way to prorogue Congress. At least the House of Representatives, which clearly has zero interest in anything resembling governance or legislating, and has spent all of it's time obsessively searching for some way to force Trump out of power. I can only imagine the cluster*bleep* that will erupt when it's time to work on the next budget.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by:

You said this more eloquently than me.

I'd have said priveleged t055ers remembering private school sleepovers.

UKTruth
This is what happens when discipline breaks donw and radicals trick their way into seats of power.
We have hundreds of representatives actively working on behalf of teh EU against their own nation that they are supposed to be representing.

Some MP's who sat in, a lot of them, were also singing "We'll keep the red flag flying here". Dangerous times with so many Marxists so close to the seats of power.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:49 AM
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It's all theatre. The fact that the opposition are so sad the Speaker is leaving reveals just how bias he had become in the Brexit Epic.

The moral highground on Brexit was lost when it became clear the majority of MPs would engineer a situation which went aginst the majorty of the voters. Now these people are pretending it had nothing to do with them.

Edit to add. Red Flag being sung in the Commons is an affront. Loony Left days are here again. God help us.
edit on 10/9/2019 by paraphi because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:55 AM
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You guys cant UK can you


here is link to video

The only reason the Mps are pissed is that they wont be able to fiddle their expenses while they not in work

Brexit: Protests as five-week Parliament suspension begins

Video embedded into link, it seems to be more of a visual statment rather than assault, all a bunch of useless theives, let both sides of the Brexit debate agree, the above bunch of thieves have been getting paid for the last 3 years....for what again?
edit on 10-9-2019 by UpIsNowDown because: typo



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:00 AM
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Did no one else read the word ''ceremonial''?? Did no one else read the word ''symbolic''??

These are ceremonial gestures saying that parliament is closed. It is written right there in the quotes.

It's symbolic just like the gavel is symbolic. A pretty little gavel tapped on the desk to gain order or to announce the end of a proceeding. Where did that gavel come from, from a hammer? From a big hammer? Maybe from a big club that was used by the leader to threaten anyone who questioned his authority? Don't mess with me buddy or you'll get this over your head?
Ooooordeaaa Ooooooordeaaa.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:01 AM
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Pretty simple,
At the opening of Parliament the speaker gets taken against his will in a very staged affair and at the end of Parliament they don't want him to leave in a very staged affair, theatrics only Bercow really played along with recently.

As for the barracking of a prime minister stating he will break the law after going hitler and closing Parliament, well it speaks for itself.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:11 AM
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a reply to: Sookiechacha


So, as I understand, the conservatives are upset because, with Bercow's departure, the Labour Party will choose the new Speaker of the House, not Johnson's party.

Candidates will announce their intention to run for the job and at some point Parliament will vote to choose the new Speaker, the Speaker is supposed to be independent.



Also, as I understand it, Brits were promised a Brexit with a deal, not a hard exit with no deal. So, some that voted for Brexit also oppose Johnson's threat of a no deal Brexit.

We were offered a choice , Leave or Remain.

We chose leave



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: TerryMcGuire These anti democratic remain mps have blown this whole thing out of proportion. Parliament gets prorougued regularly except this parliament session has gone on longer than most due to politicians arguing over Brexit. Prorogation is the formal term for the end of a parliamentary session and is marked with a ceremony in the House of Lords which is just a symbolic load of guff. A new parliament session will start again in a few weeks and begins with the Queens speech which she reads out the governments new plans.

Anti democratic remain mps are using this as an excuse to try and accuse the prime minister of paralyzing parliament to make sure remain mps can't stop us leaving the EU on the 31st October. If parliament is closed down they can't keep frustrating the Brexit process, something they have been doing for over 3 years. But at this time of year there is never anything going on in parliament anyway as all the main parties are off for a month having their party conferences.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:23 AM
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originally posted by: gallop
Haha you think that shocking?

Do you even Korea, bro?



Lol

Taiwan has been known to get crazy


Here's a greatest hits package from around the world



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: Aspie
a reply to: TerryMcGuire These anti democratic remain mps have blown this whole thing out of proportion. Parliament gets prorougued regularly except this parliament session has gone on longer than most due to politicians arguing over Brexit. Prorogation is the formal term for the end of a parliamentary session and is marked with a ceremony in the House of Lords which is just a symbolic load of guff. A new parliament session will start again in a few weeks and begins with the Queens speech which she reads out the governments new plans.

Anti democratic remain mps are using this as an excuse to try and accuse the prime minister of paralyzing parliament to make sure remain mps can't stop us leaving the EU on the 31st October. If parliament is closed down they can't keep frustrating the Brexit process, something they have been doing for over 3 years. But at this time of year there is never anything going on in parliament anyway as all the main parties are off for a month having their party conferences.



He, boris, should be negotiating right now with the EU.
The longest prorogation for hundreds of years helps that how exactly?



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:31 AM
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In response to Aspie (is your name a contraction of Asperger's? Just curious) and Sookiechacha, thank you for the insights. While my main questions remain unanswered (it' been like 20 minutes since I posted, so no biggie), both responses are immensely helpful, and I will respond to both of you in turn.

Sookiechacha: This really helps us dummies understand the why's of this specific OP. I am reading from other replies to OP that, contrary to the feeling evoked by the title of thread, this was symbolic gesture of solidarity of the Labour party and not an attack upon the Speaker (quite the opposite). The true symbolism seems to be that Remainers refuses to lose that seat, and that regardless of Parliament's suspension they WILL maintain that spot. Is the Labour party the Remainer party in spirit, or is there a decisive split in the party? All my research time is spent attempting to understand US politics, more-so aimed at the past in order to understand just why my country is such a damn sh!t-show. No time for other countries at the moment, and that's a bummer (Other countries politics directly impacts my countries politics). You seem more informed, so any insights would help me and other readers, I am sure of that.

Aspie: Another node of understanding needed is WHO exactly wants to stay, as opposed to the referendum's policy of Brexit. It is my understanding that Parliament bullsh!ttery has made a EU-deal-Brexit impossible at this point; a gun to the head of the UK people by EU-influenced politicians by appearance. Either a rough exit with bad blood or back to being Europe's b!tch, even though the people wanted to leave but remain on good terms. This is a kind of browbeating style to me, but without the appearance (no meanie-meanie words, now that would be un-Lordly). UK doesn't want mainland Lords making policy for them, because Lords don't give a damn about the populace of their OWN country, let alone a foreign one.

I would probably agree with your stance of them being a disgrace to the country, seeing as they care more about the influence garnered by being an EU gimp than the cohesion of their own country. But your country's system allows for the Lords to be EXTREMELY cruel to it's populace, they seem to be like the Democrats are in my country. Ship people in who owe their continued existence in the UK to these Lords in order to always have a power base. Sounds cowardly and un-competitive, and this will inevitably bite these Lords in the ass big-time. But they'll delay this foot-up-ass like they are Brexit. I read about when your country's politicians were leaders of the world, damn shame where it is now UK people deserve better.

Again, any help with the Parliament under prorogue watch would be great. And Sookie leads me to ask of the general stances of the power bases in Parliament, so that the background of prorogued Parliament can be seen for all. I have learned to trust the honestly of posters here over the complete biased manipulation of news articles I would find trying to figure this out myself. This post was made right after Aspie's post, so any newer posts I have not seen yet; keep that in mind please!



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: contextual You mean since John Major prorogued parliament in 1997 to suppress a cash for questions report



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:34 AM
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a reply to: AndyFromMichigan
They've got a sense of history, anyway, if not a sense of proportion. Something very similar happened in one of the episodes of the struggle between King Charles I and his Parliaments- the Speaker was held in his chair so that the Commons could pass something before they left. I can't remember which episode it was without looking it up- it will have been the Petition of Right or the Grand Remonstrance, or something like that.

So basically this was a bit of play-acting around the fantasy that "our democracy is in danger". (Actually, no- there's a temporary conflict between two forms of democratic expression, viz. referendum and legislature).
At one stage. there was the idea that he might chair meetings of a sort of "House of Commons in exile", but common sense seems to have prevailed on that one.

P.S. I've looked it up now. It was, in fact, the Petition of Right, March 1629.
edit on 10-9-2019 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:42 AM
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originally posted by: contextual
The longest prorogation for hundreds of years helps that how exactly?

Let's have a sense of proportion here. During the Victorian era, as I know from my volumes of Punch, Parliament was routinely in recess from August 10th (when it became legal to shoot grouse) to the beginning of February (when it stopped being legal to shoot grouse and pheasants). The connection was very conscious. Members got resentful if they were held to business "late" ("those bills will have to be dropped, because the grouse are waiting"), or brought back "early".
In other words, the idea that Parliament needs to be in session permanently is a very modern thing, and the idea that not being in session is an unprecedented evil is a little absurd.


edit on 10-9-2019 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: Aspie

If parliment opens again in a few weeks with the Queen making a speech, why doesn't she just call for another Brexit vote, That should easily decide for the direction to take.




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