It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A Timeline For events that took place In Greek Mythology

page: 2
33
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 01:19 PM
link   

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Zanti Misfit
a reply to: FatherLukeDuke

Considering the Greeks Mythos Stories of a Fabled Ancient Civilization on an Island Continent were first Related to them from the Greek Scholar Solon after a Visit to Egypt , that Knowledge of Recorded History Predated even the Earliest Greek Civilization in Europe , so the Greeks were Latecomers to Forwarding that particular Story . I would Imagine it would be Harder to just Disregard the Atlantis Myth if Challenged by Ancient Egyptian Recorded History , no ?

That would be great, except there's not a shred of evidence in any Ancient Egyptian writing concerning anything like an ancient civilization anywhere, much less on an island continent.

Harte


Egypt went out of its way to forget the times prior to Narmer. (Although this doesn't necessarily preclude Egyptian scholars from having records of it.)

The purported source for Plato's narrative was a guy who got it from Egyptian priests, so it's clearly not something we can expect to find in the more common Greek mythology.

That's certainly obvious, given that Plato basically says the story is not Greek.
But surely you realize that Solon FAR post dated Narmer.


Yes, but he doesn't post date the Great library of Alexandria. Indeed, he predates its founding by about 300 years. The documents that would later make up that library must have been floating around somewhere. And possibly part of the reason the library was created may have been that the Greeks wanted access to Egyptian lost history.

Also, Solon was a real guy, and actually traveled to Egypt, as Plato says.

en.wikipedia.org...

In fact, he was an important reformer in Greek legislative history. Exactly the kind of guy you would think Plato might want to mention is a book about a "Republic". And I don't see any reason for Plato to want to say anything false or made-up about someone who is important to his main point.

That would seem to only diminish the credibility of his main points. Wouldn't it?

Additionally, Plato was 6th generation direct descendant of Solon..... which might give him access to information not preserved in the general historical record about Solon?



What Egyptians priests knew is one of the few things about Ancient Egypt that is well known, yet nothing at all about anything like Atlantis has ever been found.
One cannot argue that it was "hidden" knowledge while at the same time asserting it was told offhand to a vacationing Greek exile.

Harte


We know what they wrote on walls intended to be viewed by the public.

I don't think it is likely that the pharoah wanted pre-dynastic history to be put on his walls, though.....
edit on 22-9-2019 by bloodymarvelous because: further information about Solon

edit on 22-9-2019 by bloodymarvelous because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 03:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Zanti Misfit
a reply to: FatherLukeDuke

Considering the Greeks Mythos Stories of a Fabled Ancient Civilization on an Island Continent were first Related to them from the Greek Scholar Solon after a Visit to Egypt , that Knowledge of Recorded History Predated even the Earliest Greek Civilization in Europe , so the Greeks were Latecomers to Forwarding that particular Story . I would Imagine it would be Harder to just Disregard the Atlantis Myth if Challenged by Ancient Egyptian Recorded History , no ?

That would be great, except there's not a shred of evidence in any Ancient Egyptian writing concerning anything like an ancient civilization anywhere, much less on an island continent.

Harte


Egypt went out of its way to forget the times prior to Narmer. (Although this doesn't necessarily preclude Egyptian scholars from having records of it.)

The purported source for Plato's narrative was a guy who got it from Egyptian priests, so it's clearly not something we can expect to find in the more common Greek mythology.

That's certainly obvious, given that Plato basically says the story is not Greek.
But surely you realize that Solon FAR post dated Narmer.


Yes, but he doesn't post date the Great library of Alexandria. Indeed, he predates its founding by about 300 years. The documents that would later make up that library must have been floating around somewhere. And possibly part of the reason the library was created may have been that the Greeks wanted access to Egyptian lost history.

Also, Solon was a real guy, and actually traveled to Egypt, as Plato says.

en.wikipedia.org...

In fact, he was an important reformer in Greek legislative history. Exactly the kind of guy you would think Plato might want to mention is a book about a "Republic". And I don't see any reason for Plato to want to say anything false or made-up about someone who is important to his main point.

That would seem to only diminish the credibility of his main points. Wouldn't it?

Additionally, Plato was 6th generation direct descendant of Solon..... which might give him access to information not preserved in the general historical record about Solon?



What Egyptians priests knew is one of the few things about Ancient Egypt that is well known, yet nothing at all about anything like Atlantis has ever been found.
One cannot argue that it was "hidden" knowledge while at the same time asserting it was told offhand to a vacationing Greek exile.

Harte


We know what they wrote on walls intended to be viewed by the public.

I don't think it is likely that the pharoah wanted pre-dynastic history to be put on his walls, though.....

Unfortunately, the Great Library was a Greek library, not an Egyptian library.
Lost works there almost certainly were treatises written at the time about various things.

Practically everything else was taken from other places. Alexandria was a very busy port. Any ship that came there was required to turn over all the textual material they had for copying. Usually it was the copies that were returned to the owners, and not the texts they supplied.

What this means is that these works were already available elsewhere. And no elsewhere (also neither Greece or Egypt) had any tradition resembling Atlantis.

There was no search of Egypt for some "history" that would have been placed in the library.

Regarding predynastic "history" on Egyptian walls, that occurs all over Egypt. So your conjecture about no pharoah wanting that is simply wrong.

Harte



posted on Sep, 22 2019 @ 08:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Zanti Misfit
a reply to: FatherLukeDuke

Considering the Greeks Mythos Stories of a Fabled Ancient Civilization on an Island Continent were first Related to them from the Greek Scholar Solon after a Visit to Egypt , that Knowledge of Recorded History Predated even the Earliest Greek Civilization in Europe , so the Greeks were Latecomers to Forwarding that particular Story . I would Imagine it would be Harder to just Disregard the Atlantis Myth if Challenged by Ancient Egyptian Recorded History , no ?

That would be great, except there's not a shred of evidence in any Ancient Egyptian writing concerning anything like an ancient civilization anywhere, much less on an island continent.

Harte


Egypt went out of its way to forget the times prior to Narmer. (Although this doesn't necessarily preclude Egyptian scholars from having records of it.)

The purported source for Plato's narrative was a guy who got it from Egyptian priests, so it's clearly not something we can expect to find in the more common Greek mythology.

That's certainly obvious, given that Plato basically says the story is not Greek.
But surely you realize that Solon FAR post dated Narmer.


Yes, but he doesn't post date the Great library of Alexandria. Indeed, he predates its founding by about 300 years. The documents that would later make up that library must have been floating around somewhere. And possibly part of the reason the library was created may have been that the Greeks wanted access to Egyptian lost history.

Also, Solon was a real guy, and actually traveled to Egypt, as Plato says.

en.wikipedia.org...

In fact, he was an important reformer in Greek legislative history. Exactly the kind of guy you would think Plato might want to mention is a book about a "Republic". And I don't see any reason for Plato to want to say anything false or made-up about someone who is important to his main point.

That would seem to only diminish the credibility of his main points. Wouldn't it?

Additionally, Plato was 6th generation direct descendant of Solon..... which might give him access to information not preserved in the general historical record about Solon?



What Egyptians priests knew is one of the few things about Ancient Egypt that is well known, yet nothing at all about anything like Atlantis has ever been found.
One cannot argue that it was "hidden" knowledge while at the same time asserting it was told offhand to a vacationing Greek exile.

Harte


We know what they wrote on walls intended to be viewed by the public.

I don't think it is likely that the pharoah wanted pre-dynastic history to be put on his walls, though.....

Unfortunately, the Great Library was a Greek library, not an Egyptian library.
Lost works there almost certainly were treatises written at the time about various things.

Practically everything else was taken from other places. Alexandria was a very busy port. Any ship that came there was required to turn over all the textual material they had for copying. Usually it was the copies that were returned to the owners, and not the texts they supplied.


It's not an "either" "or" Their aim was to accumulate all knowledge.





What this means is that these works were already available elsewhere. And no elsewhere (also neither Greece or Egypt) had any tradition resembling Atlantis.


It certainly does not mean that. This was prior to the printing press.

Many books existed for which there was never more than one copy. Although the library scribes would make a copy of any book they got their hands on.



There was no search of Egypt for some "history" that would have been placed in the library.


An Egyptian priest named Manetho appears to have been recruited in the time of Ptolemy II (the guy who basically founded the library) to compile a (now lost) history of Egypt.

www.ancient.eu...




Regarding predynastic "history" on Egyptian walls, that occurs all over Egypt. So your conjecture about no pharoah wanting that is simply wrong.

Harte


I'm curious where you find such writings?



posted on Sep, 23 2019 @ 07:29 PM
link   

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Zanti Misfit
a reply to: FatherLukeDuke

Considering the Greeks Mythos Stories of a Fabled Ancient Civilization on an Island Continent were first Related to them from the Greek Scholar Solon after a Visit to Egypt , that Knowledge of Recorded History Predated even the Earliest Greek Civilization in Europe , so the Greeks were Latecomers to Forwarding that particular Story . I would Imagine it would be Harder to just Disregard the Atlantis Myth if Challenged by Ancient Egyptian Recorded History , no ?

That would be great, except there's not a shred of evidence in any Ancient Egyptian writing concerning anything like an ancient civilization anywhere, much less on an island continent.

Harte


Egypt went out of its way to forget the times prior to Narmer. (Although this doesn't necessarily preclude Egyptian scholars from having records of it.)

The purported source for Plato's narrative was a guy who got it from Egyptian priests, so it's clearly not something we can expect to find in the more common Greek mythology.

That's certainly obvious, given that Plato basically says the story is not Greek.
But surely you realize that Solon FAR post dated Narmer.


Yes, but he doesn't post date the Great library of Alexandria. Indeed, he predates its founding by about 300 years. The documents that would later make up that library must have been floating around somewhere. And possibly part of the reason the library was created may have been that the Greeks wanted access to Egyptian lost history.

Also, Solon was a real guy, and actually traveled to Egypt, as Plato says.

en.wikipedia.org...

In fact, he was an important reformer in Greek legislative history. Exactly the kind of guy you would think Plato might want to mention is a book about a "Republic". And I don't see any reason for Plato to want to say anything false or made-up about someone who is important to his main point.

That would seem to only diminish the credibility of his main points. Wouldn't it?

Additionally, Plato was 6th generation direct descendant of Solon..... which might give him access to information not preserved in the general historical record about Solon?



What Egyptians priests knew is one of the few things about Ancient Egypt that is well known, yet nothing at all about anything like Atlantis has ever been found.
One cannot argue that it was "hidden" knowledge while at the same time asserting it was told offhand to a vacationing Greek exile.

Harte


We know what they wrote on walls intended to be viewed by the public.

I don't think it is likely that the pharoah wanted pre-dynastic history to be put on his walls, though.....

Unfortunately, the Great Library was a Greek library, not an Egyptian library.
Lost works there almost certainly were treatises written at the time about various things.

Practically everything else was taken from other places. Alexandria was a very busy port. Any ship that came there was required to turn over all the textual material they had for copying. Usually it was the copies that were returned to the owners, and not the texts they supplied.


It's not an "either" "or" Their aim was to accumulate all knowledge.





What this means is that these works were already available elsewhere. And no elsewhere (also neither Greece or Egypt) had any tradition resembling Atlantis.


It certainly does not mean that. This was prior to the printing press.

Many books existed for which there was never more than one copy. Although the library scribes would make a copy of any book they got their hands on.



There was no search of Egypt for some "history" that would have been placed in the library.


An Egyptian priest named Manetho appears to have been recruited in the time of Ptolemy II (the guy who basically founded the library) to compile a (now lost) history of Egypt.

www.ancient.eu...




Regarding predynastic "history" on Egyptian walls, that occurs all over Egypt. So your conjecture about no pharoah wanting that is simply wrong.

Harte


I'm curious where you find such writings?

Hows do you think we know the various AE creation myths?

Maybe if you read up a little on Alexandria's library, you might come to know a thing or two about what was collected there and how it was collected.

Apparently, you want to deny that copies of books and other writings were made by hand before the printing press was invented.

You can read the fragments of Manetho's "Aegyptiaca" here.
If you simply pause to think about it, you might come to the realization that other people commented on Manetho's Aegyptiaca at the time, and some of said commentaries are available. Also, do you not think that it would have been discussed had Manetho uncovered an unknown AE tale about a previous civilization?

If you knew anything about Ancient Egypt, you'd know that they would never have had such a story due to their collective hubris.

Harte



posted on Sep, 23 2019 @ 08:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Zanti Misfit
a reply to: FatherLukeDuke

Considering the Greeks Mythos Stories of a Fabled Ancient Civilization on an Island Continent were first Related to them from the Greek Scholar Solon after a Visit to Egypt , that Knowledge of Recorded History Predated even the Earliest Greek Civilization in Europe , so the Greeks were Latecomers to Forwarding that particular Story . I would Imagine it would be Harder to just Disregard the Atlantis Myth if Challenged by Ancient Egyptian Recorded History , no ?

That would be great, except there's not a shred of evidence in any Ancient Egyptian writing concerning anything like an ancient civilization anywhere, much less on an island continent.

Harte


Egypt went out of its way to forget the times prior to Narmer. (Although this doesn't necessarily preclude Egyptian scholars from having records of it.)

The purported source for Plato's narrative was a guy who got it from Egyptian priests, so it's clearly not something we can expect to find in the more common Greek mythology.

That's certainly obvious, given that Plato basically says the story is not Greek.
But surely you realize that Solon FAR post dated Narmer.


Yes, but he doesn't post date the Great library of Alexandria. Indeed, he predates its founding by about 300 years. The documents that would later make up that library must have been floating around somewhere. And possibly part of the reason the library was created may have been that the Greeks wanted access to Egyptian lost history.

Also, Solon was a real guy, and actually traveled to Egypt, as Plato says.

en.wikipedia.org...

In fact, he was an important reformer in Greek legislative history. Exactly the kind of guy you would think Plato might want to mention is a book about a "Republic". And I don't see any reason for Plato to want to say anything false or made-up about someone who is important to his main point.

That would seem to only diminish the credibility of his main points. Wouldn't it?

Additionally, Plato was 6th generation direct descendant of Solon..... which might give him access to information not preserved in the general historical record about Solon?



What Egyptians priests knew is one of the few things about Ancient Egypt that is well known, yet nothing at all about anything like Atlantis has ever been found.
One cannot argue that it was "hidden" knowledge while at the same time asserting it was told offhand to a vacationing Greek exile.

Harte


We know what they wrote on walls intended to be viewed by the public.

I don't think it is likely that the pharoah wanted pre-dynastic history to be put on his walls, though.....

Unfortunately, the Great Library was a Greek library, not an Egyptian library.
Lost works there almost certainly were treatises written at the time about various things.

Practically everything else was taken from other places. Alexandria was a very busy port. Any ship that came there was required to turn over all the textual material they had for copying. Usually it was the copies that were returned to the owners, and not the texts they supplied.


It's not an "either" "or" Their aim was to accumulate all knowledge.





What this means is that these works were already available elsewhere. And no elsewhere (also neither Greece or Egypt) had any tradition resembling Atlantis.


It certainly does not mean that. This was prior to the printing press.

Many books existed for which there was never more than one copy. Although the library scribes would make a copy of any book they got their hands on.



There was no search of Egypt for some "history" that would have been placed in the library.


An Egyptian priest named Manetho appears to have been recruited in the time of Ptolemy II (the guy who basically founded the library) to compile a (now lost) history of Egypt.

www.ancient.eu...




Regarding predynastic "history" on Egyptian walls, that occurs all over Egypt. So your conjecture about no pharoah wanting that is simply wrong.

Harte


I'm curious where you find such writings?

Hows do you think we know the various AE creation myths?


Oh! You meant Myths!

I thought you meant history. I'm sorry. I misunderstood.

Of course the pharaohs didn't mind silly stories and fables being told about the predynastic era. So long as they are understood to be myths, and not valid institutions against which the then-present pharaoh's society could be meaningfully compared.






Maybe if you read up a little on Alexandria's library, you might come to know a thing or two about what was collected there and how it was collected.



The library existed for about 6 generations before it began to decline. Each generation was different from the one before it, and administered the library differently.





Apparently, you want to deny that copies of books and other writings were made by hand before the printing press was invented.


Of course they were, but it was expensive. And often they ended up in private collections.

Saying a book is "available" when maybe only 1000 people know it exists, and only 50 have access to an actual copy, kind of strains the meaning of that word.



You can read the fragments of Manetho's "Aegyptiaca" here.
If you simply pause to think about it, you might come to the realization that other people commented on Manetho's Aegyptiaca at the time, and some of said commentaries are available. Also, do you not think that it would have been discussed had Manetho uncovered an unknown AE tale about a previous civilization?

If you knew anything about Ancient Egypt, you'd know that they would never have had such a story due to their collective hubris.

Harte


I only brought up Manetho as a counter point to your claim that the library of Alexandria was not concerned with Egyptian history.

He was hired by Ptolemy II, the founder of the library. (Technically it was Ptolemy I who started it, but he didn't do much with it.)

You're creating a false dichotomy, that either Greek literature must have been the library's only goal (and therefore the only goal it ever pursued at all), or Egyptian literature must have been the library's only goal (and the only one it pursued).

It was ultimately a politically established institution. Politicians try to please a wide crowd when they can.



posted on Sep, 26 2019 @ 12:35 AM
link   
Hey Op! great thread, Loved the insights!!

And yeah ppl Please, no timeline can be absolutely precisely be verified, (unless some artifact has a direct date) all we can do is guesstimate the years, so in that regard, let me tell you that I heard from some indigenous elders up in a very isolated community in central mexico, up in some mountains, that about 10 000 to 12 000 years ago heroes roamed the lands doing great deeds , building stuff and the like, while doing superhuman feats of battle, just like the greek myths, but that a great light was seen to the north at midnight, that soon beckoned huge waves and earthquakes that took everything away, having to start anew, in a less civilized world.

so yeah , I'm all up for that come hitting greenland some 12000 is years ago making the oceans suddenly rock everyone's world!


Just like us, they never knew what hit them!



posted on Sep, 27 2019 @ 02:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: Harte


You can read the fragments of Manetho's "Aegyptiaca" here.
If you simply pause to think about it, you might come to the realization that other people commented on Manetho's Aegyptiaca at the time, and some of said commentaries are available. Also, do you not think that it would have been discussed had Manetho uncovered an unknown AE tale about a previous civilization?


It's funny reading those commentaries. The Christian authors who write them keep insisting that the 13000 year time span has to be mostly "lunar years", because otherwise it would move back the date of creation.

As for other civilizations, I don't think Manetho would have considered Atlantis to be "Egyptian" history.

It's not like he knew the documents he was working from were going to be lost later on.





If you knew anything about Ancient Egypt, you'd know that they would never have had such a story due to their collective hubris.

Harte


If it were just a story, then you are right. They wouldn't.

If were genuine history, and records existed, on the other hand, they just might keep them around.



posted on Sep, 27 2019 @ 08:26 PM
link   

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Zanti Misfit
a reply to: FatherLukeDuke

Considering the Greeks Mythos Stories of a Fabled Ancient Civilization on an Island Continent were first Related to them from the Greek Scholar Solon after a Visit to Egypt , that Knowledge of Recorded History Predated even the Earliest Greek Civilization in Europe , so the Greeks were Latecomers to Forwarding that particular Story . I would Imagine it would be Harder to just Disregard the Atlantis Myth if Challenged by Ancient Egyptian Recorded History , no ?

That would be great, except there's not a shred of evidence in any Ancient Egyptian writing concerning anything like an ancient civilization anywhere, much less on an island continent.

Harte


Egypt went out of its way to forget the times prior to Narmer. (Although this doesn't necessarily preclude Egyptian scholars from having records of it.)

The purported source for Plato's narrative was a guy who got it from Egyptian priests, so it's clearly not something we can expect to find in the more common Greek mythology.

That's certainly obvious, given that Plato basically says the story is not Greek.
But surely you realize that Solon FAR post dated Narmer.


Yes, but he doesn't post date the Great library of Alexandria. Indeed, he predates its founding by about 300 years. The documents that would later make up that library must have been floating around somewhere. And possibly part of the reason the library was created may have been that the Greeks wanted access to Egyptian lost history.

Also, Solon was a real guy, and actually traveled to Egypt, as Plato says.

en.wikipedia.org...

In fact, he was an important reformer in Greek legislative history. Exactly the kind of guy you would think Plato might want to mention is a book about a "Republic". And I don't see any reason for Plato to want to say anything false or made-up about someone who is important to his main point.

That would seem to only diminish the credibility of his main points. Wouldn't it?

Additionally, Plato was 6th generation direct descendant of Solon..... which might give him access to information not preserved in the general historical record about Solon?



What Egyptians priests knew is one of the few things about Ancient Egypt that is well known, yet nothing at all about anything like Atlantis has ever been found.
One cannot argue that it was "hidden" knowledge while at the same time asserting it was told offhand to a vacationing Greek exile.

Harte


We know what they wrote on walls intended to be viewed by the public.

I don't think it is likely that the pharoah wanted pre-dynastic history to be put on his walls, though.....

Unfortunately, the Great Library was a Greek library, not an Egyptian library.
Lost works there almost certainly were treatises written at the time about various things.

Practically everything else was taken from other places. Alexandria was a very busy port. Any ship that came there was required to turn over all the textual material they had for copying. Usually it was the copies that were returned to the owners, and not the texts they supplied.


It's not an "either" "or" Their aim was to accumulate all knowledge.





What this means is that these works were already available elsewhere. And no elsewhere (also neither Greece or Egypt) had any tradition resembling Atlantis.


It certainly does not mean that. This was prior to the printing press.

Many books existed for which there was never more than one copy. Although the library scribes would make a copy of any book they got their hands on.



There was no search of Egypt for some "history" that would have been placed in the library.


An Egyptian priest named Manetho appears to have been recruited in the time of Ptolemy II (the guy who basically founded the library) to compile a (now lost) history of Egypt.

www.ancient.eu...




Regarding predynastic "history" on Egyptian walls, that occurs all over Egypt. So your conjecture about no pharoah wanting that is simply wrong.

Harte


I'm curious where you find such writings?

Hows do you think we know the various AE creation myths?


Oh! You meant Myths!

I thought you meant history. I'm sorry. I misunderstood.


And I'm sorry that you don't know that there was no "history" in Ancient Egypt. It is all myths.
What we think of as history as a field of endeavor began long after Egypt was no longer Egyptian.

Harte

Harte



posted on Sep, 27 2019 @ 08:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: bloodymarvelous

originally posted by: Harte


You can read the fragments of Manetho's "Aegyptiaca" here.
If you simply pause to think about it, you might come to the realization that other people commented on Manetho's Aegyptiaca at the time, and some of said commentaries are available. Also, do you not think that it would have been discussed had Manetho uncovered an unknown AE tale about a previous civilization?


It's funny reading those commentaries. The Christian authors who write them keep insisting that the 13000 year time span has to be mostly "lunar years", because otherwise it would move back the date of creation.

As for other civilizations, I don't think Manetho would have considered Atlantis to be "Egyptian" history.

It's not like he knew the documents he was working from were going to be lost later on.

Yet it was brought up in the thread.


If you knew anything about Ancient Egypt, you'd know that they would never have had such a story due to their collective hubris.

Harte


If it were just a story, then you are right. They wouldn't.

If were genuine history, and records existed, on the other hand, they just might keep them around.


Not without implying how much better they were than this proposed older civ.

Harte



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 12:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: Harte

Not without implying how much better they were than this proposed older civ.

Harte


Well that is definitely true.

However, the specific place Solon is said to have gotten the information was the temple of Naith at Sais. Apparently the Greek citizens of that city regarded Nais as being the Egyptian equivalent of Athena. Meaning her cult probably had a lot of Greek patrons.

(Of course, I'm not suggesting that Solon didn't have to give them a hefty donation. )


She's considered the oldest deity, going all the way back to first creation. (Which would tend to make the priests interested in keeping the oldest records, if they could, to try and hold continuity to her first actions.)

However, apart from the first dynasty, it doesn't look like any pharaoh considered her their patron.

en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Sep, 29 2019 @ 01:48 PM
link   
Are you trying to give a real world timeline to Greek myths? If so you need to do some research into world events at the time, as well as read up on Herodotus and really dig in to what was actually stated in Critias and Sophocles. The basic stories of the myths are not by any means set in stone thanks to romanticizing of the stories.

I had a thread about Atlantis going on last summer, but it died off due to my inability to stay focused in this ever changing world. (Thread can be read here)



new topics

top topics



 
33
<< 1   >>

log in

join