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I have a bad feeling about Dorian

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posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:14 PM
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I was checking the expected path of Dorian today and also comparing with Sandy's path.





Dorian will be near NJ about Friday. I wonder what are the chances that it could make a turn and hit us like Sandy.

I was reading an article from nj.com with a title "Hurricane Dorian update: Storm tracks dangerously close to East Coast". We'll have a lot of rain for sure. Today is very hot here and we are under a severe thunderstorm watch for most of the areas of NJ.

Told wife to get the groceries tomorrow, just in case.
edit on 4-9-2019 by Trueman because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:18 PM
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I'm in South Jersey across the bridge from Philadelphia.

Personally based on the track as is I don't think we are going to feel anything but those down the shore may.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:23 PM
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originally posted by: opethPA
I'm in South Jersey across the bridge from Philadelphia.
Personally based on the track as is I don't think we are going to feel anything but those down the shore may.


I really hope the same but it's good to be alert too. You know, these things never follow orders.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: Trueman





You know, these things never follow orders.

That is likely untrue now days.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:55 PM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy
a reply to: Trueman



You know, these things never follow orders.

That is likely untrue now days.


Prove it. Order Dorian to go back.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:56 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

Maybe this guy has the answers!




posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

It's already down to a Cat 2. I live in SC and it's basically a windy day in New England.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:03 PM
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Well that's disappointing I hope you are safe I thought the news was that it was finally going to somehow get to Alabama



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

I have a bad feeling about Dorian too now...

In your first image it looks like a rather large penis.

Is it still going to ravage the coast?




posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:11 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari
a reply to: Trueman
I have a bad feeling about Dorian too now...
In your first image it looks like a rather large penis.





posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:20 PM
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originally posted by: Trueman

originally posted by: Lumenari
a reply to: Trueman
I have a bad feeling about Dorian too now...
In your first image it looks like a rather large penis.




Yea... do an ink blot test on Sigmund and it would be all about his mom's bits.




posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 10:50 PM
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originally posted by: Trueman

originally posted by: SeaWorthy
a reply to: Trueman



You know, these things never follow orders.

That is likely untrue now days.


Prove it. Order Dorian to go back.





Here's how Hoffman described what he found in a simulation of the Hurricane Iniki, a 1992 storm that was the most powerful ever to hit the Hawaiian islands: The most significant modifications proved to be in the starting temperatures and winds.
Typical temperature adjustments across the grid were mere tenths of a degree, but the most notable change—an increase of nearly two degrees Celsius—occurred in the lowest model layer west of the storm center. The calculations yielded wind-speed alterations of two or three miles per hour. In a few locations, though, the velocities changed by as much as 20 mph because of minor redirections of the winds near the storm’s center.

Although the original and altered versions of Hurricane Iniki looked nearly identical in structure, the changes in the key variables were large enough that the latter veered off to the west for the first six hours of the simulation and then traveled due north, so that Kauai escaped the storm’s most damaging winds.

The relatively small, artificial alterations to the storm’s initial conditions had propagated through the complex set of nonlinear equations that simulated the storm to result in the desired relocation after six hours. This run gave us confidence that we were on the right path to determining the changes needed to modify real hurricanes.

blogs.scientificamerican.com...



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 10:56 PM
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originally posted by: Trueman

originally posted by: SeaWorthy
a reply to: Trueman



You know, these things never follow orders.

That is likely untrue now days.


Prove it. Order Dorian to go back.

2017
Scientist close to being able to steer huricanes


"In the wake of Katrina, two rival teams of climate scientists are working on ways to steer hurricanes, so as to be able to avoid direct hits on major cities in the future. Both teams are using the technique of removing power and speed from strategic points in the hurricane, effectively refracting its path.
The American team is approaching this by warming the areas of the tops of the hurricane clouds, either by dropping ash to absorb heat from the sun, or directly beaming microwaves on those areas from space. The Israeli team is taking the approach of cooling the bottom of the hurricane by releasing dust along its base.

The concern is raised of lawsuits from the small towns that hurricanes are directed towards in the effort to avoid large cities. But if the space-based solution could be done efficiently, and applied to all large tropical storms, couldn't we one day send them all harmlessly into the North Atlantic?"

science.slashdot.org...



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 10:59 PM
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a reply to: Trueman



Microsoft founder Bill Gates aimed at controlling the weather. Bill Gates and scientists have applied for patents aimed at reducing the strength of oncoming hurricanes.Sep 1, 2009



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

Hey, my fellow Jersian please don't put a hex on us.

I remember Sandy..No gas...stores were empty... pretty ugly and I don't live near any beaches



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 11:17 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy
Our land is supposed to be hit by these storms, that is just the process of the planet. Europe usually will get the vestiges of the storm systems that dissipate in the Atlantic.

This is why apocalyptic wildfire occur as well, human modifications prevent the regular occurrence of smaller wild fires.



posted on Sep, 5 2019 @ 02:06 AM
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originally posted by: Willtell
a reply to: Trueman


Hey, my fellow Jersian please don't put a hex on us.

I remember Sandy..No gas...stores were empty... pretty ugly and I don't live near any beaches

Oh man, how can I forget that. It was almost like a Carrington event.

edit on 5-9-2019 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2019 @ 02:11 AM
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Dorian will not hook left to hit the Jersey area. The steering currents will.not let it happen. Dorian will be accelerating to the northeast while transitioning to an extra-tropical low.



posted on Sep, 5 2019 @ 03:15 AM
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originally posted by: jrod
Dorian will not hook left to hit the Jersey area. The steering currents will.not let it happen. Dorian will be accelerating to the northeast while transitioning to an extra-tropical low.


Just reading it went up to cat 2 again and moving slow, 8 mph. Steering winds are our hope.

Actually, it's cat 3 now.
edit on 5-9-2019 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



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