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UK civil war?

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posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:34 AM
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Got to love boris word choice

he said to Ian blackford , that we (snp - scotland) want to end the Union , after securing Scottish fish back from the EU for "this country"

notice how he never says this "unioN"

Securing "scottish" fish , for this "country"

and by that Country he means England.

I cant wait to see a general election and the tories get owned




edit on 4-9-2019 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:36 AM
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a reply to: micpsi

Class snobbery eh??? LoL

No silly class war, and it raging.


There is your out of date snobbery in spades, and its not oozing from the working man's direction.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: Dem0nc1eaner

Nope austerity brought to us by Tories.

Its there creation, nobody else.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:40 AM
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Just heard Boris said that he hasnt made any tarriff increase on Scotch Whisky in talks with the USA

aye nae wonder because it gives the UK economy 5.5 billion a year , or was last recorded as 5.5 billion in 2018 , im guessing they wont like that when we go independent.

Scotch whisky makes more money for the UK than the queen.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:41 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

No i don't.

How can the UK go bankrupt, the UK is full of bankers, and when they do feck up the people bail them out.

People might go bankrupt but bankers don't.

Nobody is shackling our press aside from Tory gag orders where the state of the NHS drug supplies is concerned.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:45 AM
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boris makes out he doesnt want negotiations in public and in private but has said in house today that they want a deal , as opposed to him saying he wants a no deal brexit as thats what was voted for.

at 12:36:49 , Boris replies to paul Blomfield MP 12:36:37

The guy doesnt have a clue



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:51 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: oldcarpy

No i don't.

How can the UK go bankrupt, the UK is full of bankers, and when they do feck up the people bail them out.

People might go bankrupt but bankers don't.

Nobody is shackling our press aside from Tory gag orders where the state of the NHS drug supplies is concerned.





The Country was virtually bankrupted by Brown selling our gold and generally running up spending out of control.

Corbyn does not like the press/media and does have plans to shackle them:

www.ft.com...

What Tory gag orders do you mean?



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 06:56 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

These ones.

www.theguardian.com...

And that's from 2018, one can only imagine what's been signed and hidden that we are not privy to?

Where are Corbyns plans to shackle our press?

The country was virtually bankrupted because it had to bail out the bankers, quite simple really.
edit on 4-9-2019 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:11 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake




Where are Corbyns plans to shackle our press?


In the FT article I linked to.

Who regulated these bankers?



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:12 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake
Was the banking collapse not the result of the housing market crash in the USA

you know the country Boris wants us to trade with after brexit.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:13 AM
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a reply to: sapien82

Ah yes - the old "It all started in the US" ploy. I see you are familiar with it.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:14 AM
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a reply to: sapien82

They were handing out silly mortgages that people could not pay in the UK the same way they were in the USA.

The banking collapse was about greedy bankers, then canny understand when enough is enough.


edit on 4-9-2019 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

I'm not signing up for the Finacial Times or wishing to subscribe oldcarpy.

Which is where your link takes me.

Need to summarise it for if you feel its important.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake




The banking collapse was about greedy bankers, then canny understand when enough is enough.


Which bankers were regulated by who?



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:20 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

Ask the Finacial Times. LoL

But most lightly the Bank of England, Prudential Regulation Authority, and Financial Conduct Authority.

Same twats that all went to the same schools as the politicians.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:23 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: oldcarpy

I'm not signing up for the Finacial Times or wishing to subscribe oldcarpy.

Which is where your link takes me.

Need to summarise it for if you feel its important.


Ah - apologies, I seem to have got in to it without subscribing but here you are:




Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy additional rights. Subscribers may share up to 10 or 20 articles per month using the gift article service. More information can be found at www.ft.com... www.ft.com... When political leaders start talking about building a better and more democratic media, all those who believe in freedom of the press should worry. Jeremy Corbyn, the UK opposition leader, this week set out just such an agenda, excoriating in Trumpian terms the “failing” media and “fake news” of the mainstream press. While he talked of a media fit for a digital landscape, Mr Corbyn’s speech was surprisingly analogue. Aside from a bizarre notion of building a British Facebook, it was aimed overwhelmingly at the BBC and the printed press. Firstly there were the carrots. He would persuade, or force, major tech companies like Google and Facebook to provide funding for investigative and local journalism. He would also extend freedom of information laws to cover private providers of public services. Both proposals have some merit. The case for supporting the local media is particularly strong. Scrutiny of local government has been badly diluted by the collapse of so many news groups. But then came the larger sticks. First his plan for a more “democratic and representative BBC” with licence fee payers electing non-executive directors, and staff electing at least some of its executives. This, he argued, would free it from the influence of political appointees. Yet the direct election of directors would leave the BBC more prey to interference, since the main parties would hotly contest such posts. The staff election of executives is an absurdity. Editors and directors must take unpopular decisions and the skills that win elections are not necessarily the same skills which make a good editor. While the BBC should be open to debate, it is too large to function as a collective. This looks less an exercise in democracy than a move to give broadcast unions a hold over output. The Labour leader has similar ideas for the private sector, suggesting that editors of major news organisations be elected by the staff. As he fights to weaken the hated press barons, Mr Corbyn also suggests the largest media groups might face enforced shareholder dilution, with staff given equity and seats on the board. This is unacceptable meddling. It is troubling to hear a would-be prime minister telling private media companies how to organise internal appointments. Other sectors might wish to take note. Mr Corbyn’s enthusiasm for empowering unions is openly stated and the media is unlikely to be the only sector he sees as suited to this model. In the weakest section of his speech, Mr Corbyn appeared to reduce the entire issue of fake news and media manipulation via the tech platforms to a problem of hostile and sometimes concocted stories by his enemies in the traditional print media. His soreness is understandable, but his focus spoke to the outdatedness of his thinking. The print media has rarely been weaker. New online sites pose innumerable challenges and barriers to entry have collapsed. The media has never been more open to a range of voices. Yet on the new media, he had little to say. Mr Corbyn’s criticisms are not all misplaced. The British media has a low trust rating, it lacks diversity and the phone hacking scandal was a disgrace. Yet it is hard to avoid the conclusion that these are the pretexts for action. His own media sympathies do not breed confidence. A commitment to a free and honest media would be more convincing were he not so enamoured of Iran’s Press TV, Russia’s RT and the communist-leaning Morning Star. There is room for a serious debate about improving UK media. But the Labour leader’s motives are all too clear. His remedies are less about freeing the press than taming it.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:25 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

One G Brown owns up to his mistake about regulating bankers here:

www.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

Don't sound any more draconian than any of the rest of the twisted bastards in Westminsters rhetoric, to be honest.

I don't particularly want Labour in any way, although i will take them over Tories any day of the week.

Personally i wish to see Westminster and everyone in it burned to the ground.

That still won't put pale to the bankers all the same. LoL



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake




Ask the Finacial Times. LoL


I could say the same about the Grauniad. "Wrong about everything, all the time" springs to mind.



posted on Sep, 4 2019 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake




Personally i wish to see Westminster and everyone in it burned to the ground


We agree again!



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