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What Is The Minimal Velocity For Stars To Appear as Blurs Of Light?

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posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:40 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: highvein

Yeah. Warp field.
That's the ticket.


Field, bubble, I think the name is still up for dibs.




posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: highvein

How does subspace factor into it?



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:43 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: highvein

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: carewemust

I think warp 4 would do it.


So your saying that the warp field is only making the stars stretch to the observer?
That is an a astute observation.


But the stars are not just "stretching". They are whizzing past the viewing portal.


True but that could be a side effect from the "Field" that bends the space making ftl possible.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:44 AM
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a reply to: Phage

I started a thread about faster-than-light radio communication capabilities last year. The answers were fascinating. But like you said, no one knows 4 sure, because it's never been done.

But the general consensus is you'd have to drop to sub-light speed to send a transmission back to Earth. Otherwise the transmission would never leave the broadcasting antenna, or something like that.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:46 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: highvein

How does subspace factor into it?


I am still pondering that. I am not sure unless it is referring to the state/environment that would allow for faster than light travel.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:47 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

But what if you're using subspace communications?



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:51 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: carewemust



What unit of time is that? 0.4 days? 0.4 years?

Did you check days or years?


I changed it to DAYS. (Years was default). OK... 146 days to go 50 light-years, travelling at warp 5.

We could visit quite a few systems over a 5 year time span, so long as we can drop out of warp close to each destination. Slow down too soon, and the 146 day trip becomes a 10 year trip!



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:52 AM
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a reply to: carewemust




But the general consensus is you'd have to drop to sub-light speed to send a transmission back to Earth. Otherwise the transmission would never leave the broadcasting antenna, or something like that.


Unless quantum communication can be achieved.
Instant communication anywhere in the universe.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:52 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

That would be so cool.

I wonder what the stars would look like.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:53 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: carewemust

But what if you're using subspace communications?


That's it! Subspace is the quantum realm.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:53 AM
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a reply to: highvein

Ansibles aren't real?

Crap.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:54 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
You wouldn't see anything except darkness. That's what you're doing, out running photons.


What about the stars in front of you? You'd see them until you pass them by, wouldn't you?



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 12:56 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

Under the rules of relativity the stars in front of you would be blue shifted. Depending upon one's velocity, visible light might become gamma.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:01 AM
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a reply to: Phage
Not yet, anyway.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:01 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

No idea but I do know if you have enough pint's of beer it pretty much creates that affect.

Seriously though High vein has given you the best answer, if a star was distant enough it would not seem to move no matter how fast you moved, a close star however would seem to zip past and even at a fraction of the speed of light due to our slow eye's that could appear as a streak of light if we were close enough to it.

But in Star Trek and other science fiction the streaking stars is just a visual cue used to give the impression of speed and movement and those typically seen in the windows of the enterprise and voyager are simply too dense, too close and too many to be realistic, star wars ship's by comparison are much faster than star trek ones and move through hyperspace so that is even more science fiction and less realistic even than star wars BUT back to your eyes, if you use a slow shutter speed on a camera the stars will look like streaks in the sky, the human eye is not as fast as a camera so it is possible if you were moving fast enough then you would see the stars appearing to your eyes to be streaks of light though if your eye's were a bit faster they would still appear to be dot's of light?.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:06 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

I don’t think that’s true I believe you would see a lot more light more like solid light...
Would be a lot like looking at a negative for a picture of space I’m thinking...



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:09 AM
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originally posted by: highvein
a reply to: carewemust




But the general consensus is you'd have to drop to sub-light speed to send a transmission back to Earth. Otherwise the transmission would never leave the broadcasting antenna, or something like that.


Unless quantum communication can be achieved.
Instant communication anywhere in the universe.


I suppose once humankind becomes that advanced, we can incorporate ourselves into a Quantum packet and go anywhere, instantly.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:11 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

I don't trust transporter technology. Don't be disassembling me!



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:12 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: carewemust




Why are you asking me!

Because it would affect what you see.
Just answer the question.


Within a warp field, time slows down, according to Einstein. I can't imagine that, so no need of asking me more about it.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:13 AM
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a reply to: carewemust




Within a warp field, time slows down, according to Einstein

I don't recall Einstein talking about warp fields.




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