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Your Opinion: Separation of Church and State

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posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

World War II:


The Pledge of Allegiance was written in August 1892 by the socialist - minister Francis Bellamy (1855-1931). It was originally published in The Youth's Companion on September 8, 1892. Bellamy had hoped that the pledge would be used by citizens in any country.

In its original form it read: "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

In 1923, the words, "the Flag of the United States of America" were added. At this time it read: "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

In 1954, in response to the Communist threat of the times, President Eisenhower encouraged Congress to add the words "under God," creating the 31-word pledge we say today.

Bellamy's daughter objected to this alteration. Today it reads: "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."


www.ushistory.org...

And two:


A law passed in a Joint Resolution by the 84th Congress (P.L. 84-140) and approved by President Dwight Eisenhower on July 30, 1956, requires that "In God We Trust" appear on American currency.


from Wikipedia
edit on 17-8-2019 by FyreByrd because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-8-2019 by FyreByrd because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd


Our second amendment says shall not be infringed but I wouldn't say it hasn't been.
Same goes for the first.
We the people tend to be a religious bunch and our behavior is greatly affected by religion. The church doesnt necessary influence the government but it does influence the people in government.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: PhilbertDezineck

originally posted by: Metallicus
In the United States we have freedom OF religion not freedom FROM religion. I think that gets lost on many people.


Actually we dont have freedom of religion ask the Mormons who had to drop the multi wife tenant of their religion to become the state of Utah. Tell the native Americans who had to drop their religious practice of shamanism because the government said so. So there really is no freedom of practicing a religion that is different from what the government says is a religion.


BINGO!!!

The nail has a big headache now...

You hit that sucker right on the head. hard!

LOL

Ouch





posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: Lucky109
Churches should be burned. We don't need any more stone age philosophy.


Who gets the "authority" to start the fires ? 🥳



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: FyreByrd


Our second amendment says shall not be infringed but I wouldn't say it hasn't been.
Same goes for the first.
We the people tend to be a religious bunch and our behavior is greatly affected by religion. The church doesnt necessary influence the government but it does influence the people in government.



Not so cleverly...




posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

God told me it needed to happen.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

Have you considered that you are failing to make your point?



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd


I don't quite follow. I agree the State cannot dictate any 'religious standards' but does that not also include that Churches (loosely defined) cannot dictate any standard on the State.


Well, I don't follow either. Religious institutions do not have the power to dictate anything to the State. They cannot implement regulations. They cannot pass laws. They cannot enforce, charge, prosecute or incarcerate anyone for anything -- including government.


In practise, the State should not make religious Statements (i.e. 10 commandments in government buildings and offices)...


Why not? What is the objection exactly? Because it promotes one religion over another? Because the 10 Commandments are in violation of our codified law?


...nor should Churches preach (openly or not) political ideologies.


Again, why not? What part of "free exercise thereof" precludes political opinions and participation? Why are religious philosophies or ideologies any different than any other philosophy or ideology that informs our opinions and participation?



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd


I don't care for this site


Why not?
&
Why ya here then?




posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:49 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd
a reply to: Gothmog

World War II:


The Pledge of Allegiance was written in August 1892 by the socialist - minister Francis Bellamy (1855-1931). It was originally published in The Youth's Companion on September 8, 1892. Bellamy had hoped that the pledge would be used by citizens in any country.

In its original form it read: "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

In 1923, the words, "the Flag of the United States of America" were added. At this time it read: "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

In 1954, in response to the Communist threat of the times, President Eisenhower encouraged Congress to add the words "under God," creating the 31-word pledge we say today.

Bellamy's daughter objected to this alteration. Today it reads: "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."


www.ushistory.org...

And two:


A law passed in a Joint Resolution by the 84th Congress (P.L. 84-140) and approved by President Dwight Eisenhower on July 30, 1956, requires that "In God We Trust" appear on American currency.


from Wikipedia

Now , how old is the US ?
See , you missed it again.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 04:06 PM
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originally posted by: Lucky109
Churches should be burned. We don't need any more stone age philosophy.


Is that you Joseph Stalin?

The ignorance present in this statement is astounding.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 04:11 PM
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originally posted by: underwerks
I'm going to quote of all people Barry Goldwater.


Mark my word, if and when these preachers get control of the [Republican] party, and they're sure trying to do so, it's going to be a terrible damn problem. Frankly, these people frighten me. Politics and governing demand compromise. But these Christians believe they are acting in the name of God, so they can't and won't compromise. I know, I've tried to deal with them.

Barry Goldwater


Link

Today's Republican party makes Barry Goldwater look like a communist.

So you quote the same feller that said


I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue!

Barry Goldwater
Thank the powers that be , that one could have never been President.
Barry Goldwater was a Republican extremist . By his own words above.

edit on 8/17/19 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: Lucky109
Churches should be burned. We don't need any more stone age philosophy.


What present day philosophy should we be building meeting places for? In your opinion when did the stone age end?
edit on 17-8-2019 by PhilbertDezineck because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 05:02 PM
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Big fan of antidisestablishmentarianism



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

It's a very important concept.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 05:46 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Oh I thought we had it where the state wasn’t allowed to choose one religion over another....not just that you can worship what you want.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

The idea was to keep the state from establishing a state religion like they have in most Muslim countries which are ruled by Shari'a where the law is religion and religion is the law.

Remember, many of the original settlers to the 13 colonies were fleeing religious persecution from either the Catholic or Anglican churches in Europe. Those were very much state religions.

And upon ratification, several of the colonies (then states) had their own official state religions within those states/colonies. The first did not require them to give those up, only said the Federal government could not then declare one religion supreme throughout the land to be backed officially by the government.

So the federal government is not supposed to pick one to impose, but neither is it necessarily supposed to hinder any of them simply for being religions, either.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: Secretrooster

Christians and Jews or any other religion can live in a Muslim nation they just need to pay an additional tax. Or rather the same religious taxes that Muslims are required to pay for charity.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 06:26 PM
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originally posted by: Lucky109
Churches should be burned. We don't need any more stone age philosophy.


If you're serious it's a good thing you're not in charge. Ignore it if you don't like it.

If you're not serious, you got me. Congrats.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 06:52 PM
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How do you guys feel about Communism?




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