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Center Of Galaxy Lights Up

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posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 09:41 PM
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This is just mind-blowing to me, especially the images. Peering all the way into the center of the Milky Way. What could be happening there is fascinating. These super long distances images on the macro scale remind me of micro-scale imagery of atoms and such.

twitter.com...

foresight.org...




posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: Relic88
That’s crazy, I can’t imagine the amount of energy it took to produce that but it was huge whatever it was.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 09:47 PM
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a reply to: Relic88
This looks identical to a lighthouse with one light. Almost as if one side is like a black hole and emits no light but the other side is spewing light or particles all while spinning.

Does anything at a quantum level or electrical level act like this?



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 09:52 PM
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originally posted by: randomthoughts12
a reply to: Relic88
This looks identical to a lighthouse with one light. Almost as if one side is like a black hole and emits no light but the other side is spewing light or particles all while spinning.

Does anything at a quantum level or electrical level act like this?



Good question. It seems to me that the very massive and very tiny can look and may even be the same. I dunno, it is just crazy when you look at the scale of supermassive suns for example and the super tiny bits that we know about. I guess it is all relative.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: Relic88
Yes I am really into space and always have been. This is a pretty amazing lapse. The 2.5 hours really makes me think. my first thought is what I described and that the rotation would be amazingly fast if that be the case. maybe it's not dimming it's just the effect of it hitting US direct on or not quite directly.

Ever since I heard about the NASA experiment of throwing a metal cable out of the space shuttle and it pretty much heat up and explode very similar to and an intense electrical reaction. The experiments since disappeared and was not continued. I research for a long time and couldn't find much on it.

This was just my turning point into researching as much as possible alternate sides of the coin. More than a decade later everything brings me back to electricity magnetism and water. Not to mention those three things can do to light. Energy, life and death. These are my first thoughts when I see things like this but it motivates me to explore the options.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 10:12 PM
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It's amazing to imagine what did happen all those thousands of years ago to cause it.
edit on 13-8-2019 by ManWhoWasThursday because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: randomthoughts12

It was air trapped in the cables. Basically turned into hot plasma.

"The electric conductor of the tether was a copper braid wound around a nylon string. It was encased in teflon-like insulation, with an outer cover of kevlar, a tough plastic also used in bullet-proof vests, all this inside a nylon sheath. The culprit turned out to be the innermost core, made of a porous material which, during its manufacture, trapped many bubbles of air, at atmospheric pressure.

Later vacuum-chamber experiments suggested that the unwinding of the reel uncovered pinholes in the insulation. That in itself would not have caused a major problem, because the ionosphere around the tether, under normal circumstance, was too rarefied to divert much of the current. However, the air trapped in the insulation changed that. As it bubbled out of the pinholes, the high voltage ("electric pressure") of the nearby tether, about 3500 volts, converted it into a plasma (in a way similar to the ignition of a fluorescent tube), a relatively dense one and therefore a much better conductor of electricity."



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 10:19 PM
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Cool ... though with the recent lightening at the North Pole, maybe LaViolette, etc., was correct and we're seeing the first flash from the "galactic superwave" that will cook us and cause a pole shift!

Or the core just exploded and the radiation and dust waves, traveling slower than light, are forthcoming.

Anyone read that Larry Niven story "At the Core?"

Flashes of light from galactic cores seldom bring glad tidings... let's hope this is just a pretty burp from an extra large black hole dinner.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 10:25 PM
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originally posted by: Baddogma
Cool ... though with the recent lightening at the North Pole, maybe LaViolette, etc., was correct and we're seeing the first flash from the "galactic superwave" that will cook us and cause a pole shift!

Or the core just exploded and the radiation and dust waves, traveling slower than light, are forthcoming.

Anyone read that Larry Niven story "At the Core?"

Flashes of light from galactic cores seldom bring glad tidings... let's hope this is just a pretty burp from an extra large black hole dinner.


Oh cool, that looks like a good read. Thanks for the tip!



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 10:30 PM
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a reply to: Stupidsecrets
Thank you for the adding details. That's really the only thing I could find is that explanation similar to what you're saying. The actual experiment and any footage or data I could not find.

I'm very interested in completing a circuit and that's kind of sounds like what it did you're saying in a nutshell.

I simply feel space is positively charged or the top of our atmosphere no matter how you look at it. The ground is a negative wonder why it's called the ground. Just like the taller clouds get it gets high enough and completes the circuit and you have lightning. I watch this everyday happen in Florida not to mention the radio towers. My calculations have predicted this over and over and over. I usually can predict the first lightning strike my cousin even asked me when he's working with me to let him know when the first strike comes.

We are both scared of lightning 😅


edit on 13-8-2019 by randomthoughts12 because: Incomplete



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 11:44 PM
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I wonder if that energy is from the SMBH eating up very large stars or smaller black holes. Or is it an emission from interacting with a transdimensional event - the same thing being "eaten" from another plane. Maybe SMBH is the entry and endpoints between all possible realities. Word salad, sorry



posted on Aug, 14 2019 @ 08:45 AM
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Active galactic nuclei can flare up like this, though usually not as brightly as 75 times their usual light level. These nuclei have a good deal of matter flowing into their central black holes, which lights up as it gets drawn in. A clump of matter going in causes a flare.

The difficulty here is that our galaxy does not have an active nuclei. Little matter present that can spiral into the black hole, called Sagittarius A*. The explanation is that some nearby object happened to pass close enough to disrupt things, causing some random matter to fall into the black hole.

Perhaps, but it seems a lot of brightness to account for in this way. With far less matter in its vicinity than in an active galactic nuclei, our's produces brighter flare-up. Hmmm...
edit on 14-8-2019 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure

edit on 14-8-2019 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure



posted on Aug, 14 2019 @ 02:56 PM
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posted on Aug, 14 2019 @ 03:02 PM
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originally posted by: Relic88
This is just mind-blowing to me, especially the images. Peering all the way into the center of the Milky Way. What could be happening there is fascinating. These super long distances images on the macro scale remind me of micro-scale imagery of atoms and such.

twitter.com...

foresight.org...


Watching it move like that, from that distance, in 2.5 hours is almost unbelievable.



posted on Aug, 14 2019 @ 03:03 PM
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originally posted by: Relic88

originally posted by: Baddogma
Cool ... though with the recent lightening at the North Pole, maybe LaViolette, etc., was correct and we're seeing the first flash from the "galactic superwave" that will cook us and cause a pole shift!

Or the core just exploded and the radiation and dust waves, traveling slower than light, are forthcoming.

Anyone read that Larry Niven story "At the Core?"

Flashes of light from galactic cores seldom bring glad tidings... let's hope this is just a pretty burp from an extra large black hole dinner.


Oh cool, that looks like a good read. Thanks for the tip!


It's just the tip.



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:35 AM
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Hi friends. I was watching some videos on the nature of light and found this image of a hydrogen atom. Compare to a spiral galaxy. Yes, a stretch I know. But I find it interesting.

i.kinja-img.com...

media.gettyimages.com...



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 01:37 AM
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a reply to: Relic88

The hydrogen atom does not look like a spiral and it isn't a disk.


edit on 8/18/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 02:09 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Relic88

The hydrogen atom does not look like a spiral and it isn't a disk.



True. I just found it to be the closest, and interesting, to me anyway. What do you think about this (sorry to put up links and stuff..)??

www.youtube.com...



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: Relic88

How's about, in your own words, you ask a specific question?



posted on Aug, 18 2019 @ 02:24 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Relic88

How's about, in your own words, you ask a specific question?


I was more interested in the first part of the video (the rest of it lost me) with the so-called Japanese Light Experiments which appears to show an individual imprinting image on film based on images he was shown. I'm not sold on this but I did recently see a mainstream article somewhere where images were reproduced from brain waves or something of the sort. I guess I don't really have a question because I don't know what to ask, to be honest. The original topic got me on to seek out info about light, and that is where I am at.

Update: This isn't where I first saw the article but is close (suffice to say the Japanse experiment was maybe "compromised") :

www.telegraph.co.uk...
edit on 18-8-2019 by Relic88 because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-8-2019 by Relic88 because: (no reason given)



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