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It's raining plastic: microscopic fibers fall from the sky in Rocky Mountains

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posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 01:45 PM
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Dear ATS Readers, Writers,

Some disturbing photos at the link about the air samples in the crisp clear Rockies....or so we thought.

Is it just me, or do these photos at the soon coming link.... also resemble photos of air samples from Chemtrail
and also "Morgellons Disease"... those pesky "parasitic fibres" that some say exist.

It's raining plastic: microscopic fibers fall from the sky in Rocky Mountains


Discovery raises new questions about the amount of plastic waste permeating the air, water, and soil virtually everywhere on Earth

Plastic was the furthest thing from Gregory Wetherbee’s mind when he began analyzing rainwater samples collected from the Rocky Mountains. “I guess I expected to see mostly soil and mineral particles,” said the US Geological Survey researcher. Instead, he found multicolored microscopic plastic fibers.

The discovery, published in a recent study (pdf) titled “It is raining plastic”, raises new questions about the amount of plastic waste permeating the air, water, and soil virtually everywhere on Earth.

“I think the most important result that we can share with the American public is that there’s more plastic out there than meets the eye,” said Wetherbee. “It’s in the rain, it’s in the snow. It’s a part of our environment now.”


Regardless of the possible source, somehow plastic is bloody everywhere. Like it doesn't take rocket science to see how we got here with plastics.

After seeing some of the beaches here in OZ...and the amount of plastic and rubbish that washes up from the sea is really heartbreaking.

The surf rescues lads on Stradbroke Island said that they have a special machine come in three times a year to sift the sand of rubbish. He said they collect multiple tons on each run.

Pravdaseeker




posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker

Bloody el... this is really is getting funked up for planet earth!

I don't have much else to say.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 02:14 PM
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Oh damm.....micro0lastics in the ocean and ground is one thing......

Fibers from the sky sumthin else.....oh damno est !

Senough to make ya wanna kick some morgellons azz
edit on 13-8-2019 by GBP/JPY because: IN THE FINE TEXAS TRADITION



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker



Morgellons from the sky is a bad thing .



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker

Is there anything in the article that explains how plastic ends up in such small fibres that it gets in the air? I always thought of plastic as being difficult to break down if not burned and burning it gives off toxic fumes.

ETA I suppose time plus wear and tear will do it.


Are obsession with plastic needs to end, I remember buying a pair of scissors when I moved house, and the plastic they were wrapped in was so tough I needed a pair of scissors to cut into it. Not having any I resorted to a knife and in my frustration I cut my finger. Not with the knife but the dammed plastic packaging!
edit on 13-8-2019 by surfer_soul because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker

Wow thanks for the post.

Some of us will cry fakes news, but many of us will gulp a little louder than we did before we read this article. This potentially is a fairly big deal.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 02:56 PM
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Ah , the extent a USGS newb will go through to get their name published .
No , not by the USGS itself , but by The Guardian



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

There’s plenty of links to various studies and pdfs in the guardian link from the op


could travel with the wind for hundreds, if not thousands, of kilometers. Other studies have turned up microplastics in the deepest reaches of the ocean, in UK lakes and rivers and in US groundwater.


It’s probably in a drinking water too, I suggest using a filter just in case.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
Ah , the extent a USGS newb will go through to get their name published .
No , not by the USGS itself , but by The Guardian

...AND the USGS. They published a study. There's a link to it.

eta: Looks to me like this might debunk morgellons. Dead ringer!
edit on 13-8-2019 by tjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 03:40 PM
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remove
edit on 13-8-2019 by chadderson because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 04:06 PM
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I live in the Rockies where the air is supposed to be fresh and clean... Take a very powerful flashlight and shine in into the sky and tell me what you see in the beam.

I showed it to my lady and she said..."think about it, we breath all that sh!t"

I don't know exactly what was revealed in the beam but it was full of particles.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 04:17 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12
I don't know exactly what was revealed in the beam but it was full of particles.

Water droplets? Pollen?

Oh, and BTW, that's why our respiratory system is lined with sticky hairs. It's a dusty world. We evolved to deal with it.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 04:27 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: olaru12
I don't know exactly what was revealed in the beam but it was full of particles.

Water droplets? Pollen?

Oh, and BTW, that's why our respiratory system is lined with sticky hairs. It's a dusty world. We evolved to deal with it.


Probably, but what do you think those shiny metallic looking fibers were? Maybe dust, but from what?



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 04:33 PM
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originally posted by: surfer_soul
a reply to: Gothmog

There’s plenty of links to various studies and pdfs in the guardian link from the op


could travel with the wind for hundreds, if not thousands, of kilometers. Other studies have turned up microplastics in the deepest reaches of the ocean, in UK lakes and rivers and in US groundwater.


It’s probably in a drinking water too, I suggest using a filter just in case.

No thanks
The other links are all referring to the Guardian link .
I went straight to the USGS site .
Then searched the name

Again , my statement holds



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

Dear ATS Readers, Writers,

It mentions that fibres come off our clothes all the time, it is where lint comes from...

Thats a lot of bloody "lint".... Anyhow, his study was for nitrogen pollution...my guess is NOX, etc..

The fibres just showed up in the samples..


Pravdaseeker



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
Ah , the extent a USGS newb will go through to get their name published .
No , not by the USGS itself , but by The Guardian


Use your loaf man,
How can something like this be surprising...never mind acting like a cynic to boot. The effects of plastic are as plain as the nose on your face.

Ever heard of synthetic Latex....look it up, Google is your friend.
Even your friendly mate, the scratchcard, may be of synthetic latex, and when you scratch it, do you see all the dust on your pants as you brush it off..into the air?

I personally worry more about very toxic junk material with long life emissions in the air than I do about climate change, your mate, the scratchcard is just one of many of those.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 07:00 PM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker

I was just going to say, if you have long underwear or polar fleece, you are probably not following the care and handling instructions, throwing your clothes in the dryer, and creating small enough micro plastics that do not get trapped by the lint trap. They get blown right out the dryer exhaust into the air.

The stuff either mixes with drain water and out into the ocean it goes, or it settles onto the ground until a good wind whips it all back up. It then floats around (it is kind of like a "pollen-bow" during high pollen season; it is a haze as it slowly sinks back down to earth).

They found some on an uninhabited place in the Alps last year. They traced its route into the area. It drifted in from urban centers many miles away. I don't wear my fleece stuff except during cold weather and try to keep washing to a minimum. Never much of a polyester man either. Except maybe what is in my socks.

Great. Now to figure out a way to clean my socks without polluting the environment.

ETA: All is not lost...


Ferreira is able to extract the microplastic pollution from water using ferrofluid. This is a liquid composed of oil and magnetite. This enables the liquid to stick to plastics and makes it capable to be removed using magnets.

hydrogenfuelnews.com, Aug. 9, 2019 - Teen develops innovative method for extracting microplastic pollution from water.

How's that for a science fair project?!!


edit on 13-8-2019 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: stoopid autocorrect



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 08:23 PM
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I have no data to back this up, but it's probably a safe bet to assume every time you clean out the lint trap of your clothes dryer, you create an aerosol microplastic atmosphere hundreds (thousands?) of times greater than outside air.

I know nobody that dons a dust mask to clean out the lint trap.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

Probably barium or aluminum, or some other toxic heavy metal compound that plays hell with the human body.

Scary stuff, nonetheless.

I wonder if PRP would work on this stuff, seeing as how plastic is a petroleum product.
unireminc.com...

edit on 13-8-2019 by Notoneofyou because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-8-2019 by Notoneofyou because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 10:24 PM
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Plastics are also in products like toothpaste, make-up products, shampoos and they all get flushed which end's up in rivers & oceans > rain > rain with micro parts of plastics.

Just think about it, there is some BIG EVIL going on, how can plastics even be allowed in such products!? Why do company's make such products??

When you eat things (fish and so on) out of the oceans, they are filled with micro parts of plastics.

Each year you and me eat hundreds of thousands micro parts of plastics for sure. Even with just inhaling air you get allot of plastics inside of you! LOL!?Maybe we see some kind of evolution in progress in the near furure where plastics are even inside our DNA

edit on 13-8-2019 by Pluginn because: (no reason given)



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