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Tired of the Arguments

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posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 06:58 PM
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"The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States."
U.S. Constitution, Article VI, clause 3

What does that mean, "shall be bound by Oath"?
Does that mean you're a Treasonous Scum Bucket if you break your oath, subject to a Traitor's death?

The oath used today has not changed since 1966 and is prescribed in Title 5, Section 3331 of the United States Code:

“I, -Congress Critter's Name-, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter.

What does that mean, "bear true faith and allegiance to the same"?


the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

What does that mean, "shall not be infringed"?

in·fringe
/inˈfrinj/
verb
actively break the terms of (a law, agreement, etc.).
"making an unauthorized copy would infringe copyright"
synonyms: contravene, violate, transgress, break, breach, commit a breach of, disobey, defy, flout, fly in the face of, ride roughshod over, kick against;

act so as to limit or undermine (something); encroach on.
"his legal rights were being infringed"
synonyms: undermine, erode, diminish, weaken, impair, damage, compromise


I'm no dummy, but I don't understand why we're being tolerant of elected officials, lawmakers, judges ... you know ...

The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States
... who never give a second thought to the deliberate oversight of their sworn oath.

If they can't obey the highest law in the land, please tell me why any of us should consider obeying the laws they want us to.




posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:12 PM
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a reply to: Deplorable

They honestly do not care because they think we all agree with their whining "sacrificing liberty/rights/privacy/due process is totally worth it if it saves just oooooonnne liiiiife."

And I actually think we are in the minority now. Look around. It isn't just politicians but people on all sides saying they will hand over their Constitutional Rights and Protections because someone said it might keep someone safe somewhere.

People have gone bonkers in this country and it truly is getting to midnight here on this Constitutional Republic time clock with citizens like this.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: Deplorable


Does that mean you're a Treasonous Scum Bucket if you break your oath, subject to a Traitor's death?


Seditious...

Treason is aiding an enemy of war 👍



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:35 PM
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What does that mean, "shall be bound by Oath"? Does that mean you're a Treasonous Scum Bucket if you break your oath, subject to a Traitor's death?

Yes , that would be , by definition , traitorous .
Yet not meaning a "traitor's death"
Treason is not necessarily punishable by death .
High Treason may be in certain cases.

I do agree there is a lot of treasonous officials coming out of the woodwork lately .
They do need to be charged , but will most likely not .




posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:35 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Deplorable


Does that mean you're a Treasonous Scum Bucket if you break your oath, subject to a Traitor's death?


Seditious...

Treason is aiding an enemy of war 👍

Incorrect.
High Treason is aiding and abetting.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

Treason is defined in the constitution, the thing both parties pick and choose from as they wish.

High treason is a legal term in the UK, not the US.
edit on 7-8-2019 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:36 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Deplorable


Does that mean you're a Treasonous Scum Bucket if you break your oath, subject to a Traitor's death?


Seditious...

Treason is aiding an enemy of war 👍

Incorrect.
High Treason is aiding and abetting.


Citation from US law?



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Gothmog

Treason is defined in the constitution, the the both parties pick and choose from as they wish.

High treason is a legal term in the UK, not the US.

Treason and High Treason are defined.
They are used by military court of law.
Malfeasance
Sedition
Petty Treason
Treason
High Treason

Most folk , when speaking in US terms , lump all together for convenience.

edit on 8/7/19 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:39 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Gothmog

Treason is defined in the constitution, the the both parties pick and choose from as they wish.

High treason is a legal term in the UK, not the US.

Treason and High Treason are defined.
They are used by military court of law


They are defined by Websters, that isn't what our court of law goes off of though.

High treason is a UK (probably some other countries as well) legal term.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:42 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Deplorable


Does that mean you're a Treasonous Scum Bucket if you break your oath, subject to a Traitor's death?


Seditious...

Treason is aiding an enemy of war 👍


Sedition, treason.

To-may-to, to-mah-to

All are douche-waffles who deserve a Road House throat punch.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:46 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Deplorable


Does that mean you're a Treasonous Scum Bucket if you break your oath, subject to a Traitor's death?


Seditious...

Treason is aiding an enemy of war 👍


Sedition, treason.

To-may-to, to-mah-to

All are douche-waffles who deserve a Road House throat punch.


I'm all for holding elected and appointed government officials accountable to the law.... So long as it's constitutional.

If we allow the federal government more leeway, it's just a matter of time till this or a new admin uses it on us.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog


They are used by military court of law.


But only the military court of law is an insulated system for the military.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Gothmog

Treason is defined in the constitution, the the both parties pick and choose from as they wish.

High treason is a legal term in the UK, not the US.

Treason and High Treason are defined.
They are used by military court of law




They are defined by Websters, that isn't what our court of law goes off of though.

High treason is a UK (probably some other countries as well) legal term.

Treason is defined by the US Federal Government and not by Webster's dictionary
What I listed are the differing charges that comes with a verdict of guilty of generic treason.

edit on 8/7/19 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 08:11 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Gothmog

Treason is defined in the constitution, the the both parties pick and choose from as they wish.

High treason is a legal term in the UK, not the US.

Treason and High Treason are defined.
They are used by military court of law




They are defined by Websters, that isn't what our court of law goes off of though.

High treason is a UK (probably some other countries as well) legal term.

Treason is defined by Webster's dictionary
Not the differing charges that comes with a verdict of guilty of treason.


If you look at US civilian law, there is only treason. If you look at historical cases, there is only treason.

Sedition is what comes into play if it's not treason. Treason is clearly defined by the constitution.

If we're going to have a thread splitting hairs under the constitution, we can't pick and choose.

If you want to push for loosely applied cases of treason, understand powers in the future will exploit that precedence for their agendas.

Better to have more rights on our side than more power on the other.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 09:32 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
All are douche-waffles who deserve a Road House throat punch.

Are engineers still made with strong backs, arms of steel, and hands torn straight from bedrock?

Then a throat punch it is!!



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 10:02 PM
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a reply to: Deplorable

"Treason is a unique offense in our constitutional order—the only crime expressly defined by the Constitution, and applying only to Americans who have betrayed the allegiance they are presumed to owe the United States. While the Constitution’s Framers shared the centuries-old view that all citizens owed a duty of loyalty to their home nation, they included the Treason Clause not so much to underscore the seriousness of such a betrayal, but to guard against the historic use of treason prosecutions by repressive governments to silence otherwise legitimate political opposition. Debate surrounding the Clause at the Constitutional Convention thus focused on ways to narrowly define the offense, and to protect against false or flimsy prosecutions. "

Treason Clause



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 10:30 PM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
a reply to: Deplorable

"Treason is a unique offense in our constitutional order—the only crime expressly defined by the Constitution, and applying only to Americans who have betrayed the allegiance they are presumed to owe the United States. While the Constitution’s Framers shared the centuries-old view that all citizens owed a duty of loyalty to their home nation, they included the Treason Clause not so much to underscore the seriousness of such a betrayal, but to guard against the historic use of treason prosecutions by repressive governments to silence otherwise legitimate political opposition. Debate surrounding the Clause at the Constitutional Convention thus focused on ways to narrowly define the offense, and to protect against false or flimsy prosecutions. "

Treason Clause

Look deeper. Use your own sourced article.

Consider this:

A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state

Take away the guns and you no longer have a well regulated militia, and by default that which secures a free state.

There is no argument here. If you infringe, you are, in fact, committing an indictable act of Treason. Just because no one has been charged to date, doesn't mean it can't happen pretty damn quick. People have been easily constrained by nuances and minutiae. One of these days, someone's going to cut to the chase and a lot of free wheeling politicians stand to hang for their crimes. You break your oath and it's broken. Superglue? I don't think so.

I'm pretty sure the politicians are aware of the Red Team analysis. Best they'll be able to do is flee the country and live a while longer.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: Deplorable

" What does that mean, "shall be bound by Oath"?
Does that mean you're a Treasonous Scum Bucket if you break your oath, subject to a Traitor's death? "

Roger That .




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