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What Is Your Favourite Work of Litertaure?

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posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

Do you mean that, or are you just jumping the bandwagon?




posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: CyberMoses1001
a reply to: Liquesence

Do you mean that, or are you just jumping the bandwagon?


Mean what?



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

About the quality of Shakespeare's work?



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 07:26 PM
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originally posted by: dogstar23
a reply to: CyberMoses1001

www.amazon.com...=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_aBFsDb8R1K4RF" target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">Bad Wisdom, by Bill Drummond and Mark Manning


let me try this again...
edit on 8/6/2019 by dogstar23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 07:33 PM
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originally posted by: CyberMoses1001
a reply to: Liquesence

About the quality of Shakespeare's work?


Of course I mean it.



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: CyberMoses1001
a reply to: Metallicus

I do not to be rude, but that choice, to me, suggests either you are a newbie to literature and find yourself following mainstream trends, or your reading back-catalogue is not that vast, as everyone, who claims to know literature, chooses the Hobbit, whereas, those who do, choose Joyce's Ulysses, or some other work of high enlightenment. Personally my favourite is Ulysses, as it contains the complete works of literature, alongside some other woks especially Tolstoy's "Redemption", Yeats' "Collected Poems" and most importantly Rimbaud's "illuminations", his poems, Drunken Boat, and Mystical, such perfection of the poetic word.


I read to enjoy not to impress people.

I do not mean to be rude, but you come off like a snob.
edit on 2019/8/6 by Metallicus because: Sp



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 08:36 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm

originally posted by: Liquesence

originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: CyberMoses1001

Mary Chestnut's diary.

It is a look at the civil war from a confederate side of a woman.
I found it very interesting, enlightening, and a lot of her words of wisdom still apply today.


I'm currently reading, among other things, Sarah Morgan: A Civil War Diary of a Southern Woman.


Oh, I'm going to get this one too. Mary Chestnut was an more mature woman's view, this is a young woman's view. It will be interesting to read the difference.


You should check it out.

While not a "work of literature" as per the OP but based on interviews, I love primary sources and I love reading slave narratives.

The Federal Writers Project/Works Progress Admin is a good place to start.

If that's your thing
edit on 6-8-2019 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 08:52 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

Metallicus, you beat me to it.

Literature is about what one gets out of it. How dare you put others down for what they are reading and what they enjoy and for what speaks to them!

Keep in mind that not everyone is a reader, but some do try.

Not impressed CyberMoses1001.



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 09:08 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

I was just wondering, I like his work too, but I feel, by looking over the wall, at the real melodrama, the Tudor Dynasty was a greater piece of playwrighting. Although not a playwright, as far as I am aware, John Milton was a much greater writer than Shakespeare.



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 09:14 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

Yes but America has no real literary heritage or literary criticism like Europe does, our literature goes back to the beginning of civilisation, it is a strong literary world where literary criticism of the highest standard is common, and expected in conversation, and to claim to understand literature amidst lovers of the craft, you must be knowledgeable, this is all, a misunderstanding between the American and European way of thinking, and tot he European literati, the mention of Tolkien by people who claim to know literature, is like an English man pretending to be the biggest LA Lakers fan. Do your read literature literally, superficially, or the way it is supposed to be read, as multilayered and highly symbolic?



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: CyberMoses1001

Eh, Europe's lit is as much ours as it is yours. Our roots are mainly European. We have a tradition of our own that has branched off from there. You can make the argument that anything in British lit post the Founding of the US is distinctly British or European the way anything written in the US would be distinctly American, but up until then, we shared a literary tradition.



posted on Aug, 6 2019 @ 11:42 PM
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Reading for reading sake... what a topic. Let me preface this with the fact that I had a misspent youth. In that I had spent way to much of it reading. To be pretentious, I had read 90 of the 100 top books "to read in your life" by the time I was 16, and I can say vehemently that most books do not belong on any list including those that are held up as of outstanding merit. Most of them are held up as great because they are boring and prosaic in their mundanity, Ulysses is one of these, Moby Dick is another to rattle off just two that try to persuade you by being voluminous rather than being actually interesting or thought provoking.

Now to get off of my high horse and get some skin in the game, my favorite pieces of literature are one of two. The Complete Works of Aristotle (or Nicomachean Ethics if you force me to pick a certain section), or "Good Bad Books" an Essay by Orwell.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:04 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Yes it is, but it is not, literature is everyone's, but it is also deeply connected to the environment in which it was formed, and by the minds and hearts of those who formed it, for example, as and American you may read Joyce and Ulysses, but you will never understand Joyce the way a European does, nor an Irishman.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 07:10 AM
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a reply to: dubiousatworst

To call Ulysses boring is an insult to literature and shows you have no understanding of literature, as the novel forever changed literature and nobody since has come close to matching the quality it, it is why it is considered a masterpiece of modernism. Ulysses is the greatest novel ever written, a novel which is deeply symbolic and allegorical, the structure of it, due to its symbolism, allegory and multilayered reality, is almost impossible to achieve as it include the Odysseus by home, Plato's Republic, Apology, The Soul and Symposium, alongside the works of Aristotle and the story of the US President at that time, the greater realities of Ulysses go far too deep to explain here, freemasonry, space, time, language, etc it is why Joyce's work has scholars, and not many writers have scholars. the Aristotle connection may make you re-read Joyce and to see deeper into the symbolism and allegory.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: CyberMoses1001

Modernism mostly belongs in the bin. Opinions are opinions, not only you are entitled to one. Jumping from style to style just shows a lack of conviction, while only theoretically following the (18 parts instead of 21? come on it is made up bs to pump it up) Odyssey shows that it is a paint by number job, a cheap imitation.
edit on 7-8-2019 by dubiousatworst because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: dubiousatworst

Why so? All I see being written these days is Joyce's rubbish bin. It's not style jumping, Joyce understood the structure of civilisation and the sciences and philosophies, and as a natural novelist, rather than a brick layer for the criminal justice system, he done his best to achieve this masterpiece of literature You know nothing about the structure of Joyce's parts and chapters, they cyclical nature of them back to one another, the return of Ulysses to Penelope, it is far from BS, what do you know of Judaism, of metaphysics, of Freemasonry, of the souls existence and almost eternal wandering though the eternal empty void of the cosmos? It is important for numerous reasons but because it was written during the start of World War Two, the novel echos with the ghosts of that era, the sorrow of genocide, the pain of loneliness, the cruelties of men with power, and amidst it all, one man's rational perspective on society and his messages to those that are listening, it was not written as fan fiction, it is literary fiction, it has literary merit, it is almost Joyce's confession to God, of the Cosmos, for his existence, as if asking for this God, which he see's as the cosmos, and his journey to death, for forgiveness of mens' crimes Joyce. If you think his work is BS, then go ahead, beat it, write better, write a 300,000 word masterpiece that is perfectly structured, minus the flaws inherent in the works of a natural writer.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: dubiousatworst

If Joyce is BS, then, did you know his first main work, the Portrait of the Artist, is structured on numerous things, but most importantly, the Creation of Adam by Michelangelo.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 11:04 AM
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originally posted by: CyberMoses1001
a reply to: Metallicus

I do not to be rude, but that choice, to me, suggests either you are a newbie to literature and find yourself following mainstream trends, or your reading back-catalogue is not that vast, as everyone, who claims to know literature, chooses the Hobbit, whereas, those who do, choose Joyce's Ulysses, or some other work of high enlightenment. Personally my favourite is Ulysses, as it contains the complete works of literature, alongside some other woks especially Tolstoy's "Redemption", Yeats' "Collected Poems" and most importantly Rimbaud's "illuminations", his poems, Drunken Boat, and Mystical, such perfection of the poetic word.


This to me reads like when you meet one of those music fans that names obscure bands and if you dont listen to those obscure bands then you just aren't a music fan.. Ridiculous in every way. =)



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

No, music as we know it, developed after World War Two and with the modern military and the building of modern civilisation, before then, music and arts was a craft, and the artists these days in music, literature and the arts, would never have survived in those days, as they fail to produce masterpieces, it is the equivalent of giving a Surgeon's Degree to a Heart Surgeon because they produced a cows heart at Sunday dinner.
It is not Ridiculous, go to an Classical Orchestra, or Julliard and call it ridiculous.



posted on Aug, 7 2019 @ 12:27 PM
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Olaf Stapledon "Starmaker" a book of philosophy disguised as sci-fi.

Konrad Lorenz "On Aggression", animal behavior. These books many years ago changed my outlook on life.




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