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Engineering of the Olympic class ships. (video)

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posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 05:00 PM
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To be more recognized, the Olympic class Ships were famous cruise liners and it's most famous one being the Titanic.
There were three in total, The Olympic, Titanic and Britannic. Built between 1911 and 1915, and all lived a wild roller coaster of a life.

If you were like me, I was fascinated with this sort of thing as a kid, I loved the deep sea exploration, the engineering involved, the mystery and for the most part I had no idea the Titanic had two twin sister ships. The three ships were built to be trans Atlantic cruise liners, to be top of their class luxury vessels, built by the Harland & Wolff ship building company for the White star line ship company.
Sadly, as we all know one met their fate at the bottom of the Ocean, another fell victim to a watery grave as well. But one lived out it's full life and was salvaged for scrap and parts.

Some engineering facts about the titanic:
- Since welding was still relatively new, it was held together by rivets, and over 3,000,000 of them were used.
- The main propeller was made from a single cast of Manganese and bronze.
- It was run by coal, which created steam, and powered both a turbine engine, and piston engines.
- The fourth 'smoke stack' to the stern of the vessel wasn't for exhaust it was for ventilation.
- Samples of the steel that made up the haul of the vessels were found to be hard yet brittle, and when in the frigid temperatures of the Atlantic made it even more so.

And finally, to continue with my series of interesting videos I find, enjoy:





posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 05:36 PM
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Fascinating and informative video! Imagine all the work that went into those ships? Wow! Only watched it partway and will continue with it later. just wanted to thank you for sharing this with us.



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:02 PM
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I agree that was a great video and answers a lot of questions I had and some I didn't know I had. Thanks, OP.



edit on 31-7-2019 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:09 PM
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Latest theories from Belfast indicate the the coal fire that was burning even before the ship had sailed..and continued to burn, played a considerable part in the sinking.
edit on 31-7-2019 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

A fire caused it to run into an iceberg?



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:40 PM
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originally posted by: strongfp
a reply to: smurfy

A fire caused it to run into an iceberg?


One theory was that the coal fire weakened the hull and that contributed the sinking.
I have read that the hole wasnt as big as previously believed and was only about the size of a refrigerator. Theory of course..

My theory was that the ships went as tough as planned. The one hit a mine and sank in an hour.



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 07:08 PM
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originally posted by: strongfp
a reply to: smurfy

A fire caused it to run into an iceberg?


Oh! there were several circumstances, but the fire was important, very important.
It's best explained by this very matter-of-fact link, rather than wacky tabloid headlinings,

medium.com...

(1) Basically, the ship was damaged by the fire no matter what else, and was allowed to sail by subterfuge,
(2) the fire could not be put out, as some Americans might know with the eternal coal fire in Centralia, Pennsylvania.
(3) because of..(2) above, the burning coal was transferred to other boilers and accelerated Titanic's speed by default.
(4) The damaged Olympic was brought back to Belfast for repair after a collision, and put back Titanics maiden voyage enough to bring it into into iceberg expectancy.
(5) The ship was not expected to sink after the collision after a summary was made, but did so because the fire torn bulkhead failed, weakened by the fire.

(6) Given that fire on board was at that time considered a thread from precedence, Titanic should never have sailed.

Another way of looking at it to propound the obvious, it should never have been allowed to sail.



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