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How to Write a Stupid Law

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posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:29 AM
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We have all heard of stupid laws from various states across the country. Here's a few of them:
  • In Alabama, bear wrestling matches are prohibited.
  • It is illegal to view a moose from an airplane in Alaska.
  • In Arizona, it is illegal to promote the use of or own more than 6 dildos.
  • It's illegal for a barber to hum a tune while cutting your hair in Connecticut.
  • Having sexual relations with a porcupine in Florida is illegal.
  • In Indiana, you're breaking the law if you catch a fish with your bare hands.
  • One may not dye a duckling blue and offer it for sale in Kentucky, unless more than six are for sale at once.
  • In Massachusetts, candy may not contain more than 1% of alcohol.
  • Don't land an airplane in a city park in Minnesota... it's ilegal.
  • New Hampshire says it is illegal to collect and carry away seaweed at the beach, but only at night.
  • No person may bite off another person’s limbs in Rhode Island.
  • Playing a pinball machine in South Carolina is illegal unless you're over 18.
  • Don't use x-rays to fit shoes in Washington unless you want a criminal charge.
Stupid laws, right? Has anyone ever sat down and wondered why on earth someone would pass a law like that?

Well, wonder no more, thanks to the new law being debated:
  • It may soon be a felony in New York to douse a policeman with water.
That's right, New York is debating making dousing a police officer with water a felony. I kid you not. In a hundred years, people will look at lists of stupid laws and wonder why on earth this was ever made a law?

Of course, today we know why: this show of disrespect for the police has gotten out of hand.


So what is the response? A sudden crackdown, a hard crackdown, on the perpetrators of a minor offense that has gotten out of hand.

Now, I support this law, because I understand why it is in place. I hope every person who so much as thought about joining in this craziness gets a nice legal beatdown to emphasize that even minor violence against the police can have consequences. But that's really not the base reason for this law that will one day be a punchline. The real issue is that this got out of control in the first place. The New York Times gives the reason this has happened:

Police officers are often accused of using too much force, as the proliferation of cellphone cameras makes it easy for people to record and share events widely online. But the recent videos prompted a rare rebuke from the Police Department’s highest-ranking uniformed officer, who said the officers had put up with too much.


Accusations of police abuse have run rampant as of late. I get that. Many of them have merit. I get that, too. But then again, not all of them do. These accusations are typically based in a lack of understanding of the situation the officer found him/herself in. But there are some which are abuse of power, and that responsibility falls on the shoulders of those in the upper levels of the police department who allow such things to happen. So the officers are confronted with a dilemma... it's just water. Should they (properly) respond to the attack and risk being accused of excessive use of force? Or should they ignore it and let the practice go viral, potentially endangering themselves and others if some kid decides it will be fun to throw a bucket of water at an inopportune moment?

Most have chosen to ignore the practice as long as they can.

Now, I have to congratulate Bill DeBlasio... excuse me while I puke in my mouth a little at that thought... for quickly coming to the aid of these officers. Several perpetrators have been rounded up and arrested already, most as I understand it for "criminal mischief." More arrests are surely coming. But at the end of the day, what has been accomplished by this viral prank?

A new harsh law that will make no sense to future generations.

Was it really worth the sudden, quick thrill of dousing a cop?

The problem, as I see it, is that we have allowed our youth to ignore reality far too long. We teach them that they have not only a right, but a duty to "protest" anything that doesn't go their way. We show them the proper method of demonizing those we disagree with. We instruct them on how to avoid responsibility and how to expect others to make them more comfortable, while never showing them that they might need to retaliate someday. And it has gotten us a quick thrill, akin to throwing a bucket of water on a random cop.

It has also gotten us Antifa beatings, disrespect for authority, acceptance of criminal activity, social gimme programs we cannot hope to afford, poor production in the workplace, and unrealistic life expectations. Watch for new stupid laws coming to a town or state near you, as throngs of youth find out the hard way that reality is... well, reality.

Was it worth it?

TheRedneck




posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:35 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck



Having sexual relations with a porcupine in Florida is illegal.


Humm I always heard once you have a porcupine you never go back ..



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:36 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Oddly enough I would imagine all those laws were made because the situation was a problem at the time. Or at least one idiot was a problem.

Now as for the police getting soaked, today its water, tomorrow it's a rock.
You shouldn't be able to do that to anyone walking down the street so why is it kosher to do it to a cop?



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:43 AM
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In Georgia , it is illegal to have an ice cream cone in your back pocket on Sunday
Any other day ? - apparently not.
Any other pocket ? - apparently not.
I though an assault on a police officer was a Federal offense anyway ...
Oops , felony.
The country today...


edit on 7/31/19 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:51 AM
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The worst isn't a funny one......

Hemp....mj is really hemp. So to invent a verbal term for hemp....and have separate law a for that invented item is illegai.....stupid law to have to contrive a Mexican language lay term for it...

In Texas, you only need a fishing license if ya have a reel on that pole.....
edit on 31-7-2019 by GBP/JPY because: IN THE FINE TEXAS TRADITION



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 06:53 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Regarding pinball, the machines were illegal in NYC until 1976! This was because they were used as gambling devices years before.
Brief History of Pinball... Princeton U



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 07:08 AM
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originally posted by: GBP/JPY
The worst isn't a funny one......

Hemp....mj is really hemp. So to invent a verbal term for hemp....and have separate law a for that invented item is illegai.....stupid law to have to contrive a Mexican language lay term for it...

In Texas, you only need a fishing license if ya have a reel on that pole.....


Hemp is the male plant which is not psychoactive, used purely for its fibrous plant material in textiles, paper, ect.

MJ is the female plant that is used for it's psychoactive properties.

To your point though, many believe the latter was used to ban the former as well... As it threatened lumber industry.



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 07:30 AM
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And they wonder why the police are so heavy-handed.



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 07:30 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22


Oddly enough I would imagine all those laws were made because the situation was a problem at the time. Or at least one idiot was a problem.

That's my point. Of course, I'm not sure about the porcupine thing in Florida... seems the act might be considered excessive punishment by itself...


Now as for the police getting soaked, today its water, tomorrow it's a rock.
You shouldn't be able to do that to anyone walking down the street so why is it kosher to do it to a cop?

Oh, agreed completely! If someone is bold enough to do something to a cop, they are far more than bold enough to do it to anyone else. That's the real reason why "cop-killers" are hunted with such ferocity: if someone is willing to kill an armed, trained cop, a normal person has no hope.

And of course, knowing the person killed adds a bit of urgency as well.

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

I'm still trying to figure out a logical reason why gambling is illegal in the first place. I now it can become an addiction, and I know that some people will gladly bet away their life savings... but what's the difference between that and buying groceries at a convenience store for three times the going price? Or spending your last dime on a bottle of Mad Dog 20-20?

Even worse, all insurance is a gamble. You spend a small amount in the future expectation of a huge payoff. The difference is that when that payoff happens, you don't get the money; the hospital, doctor, body shop, or undertaker does. We literally try to force people to take that gamble.

Rigged games (like insurance), sure, that's fraud. But just gambling? Nah...

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 07:45 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Best one I've heard for my state is

Any motorist driving along a country road at night must stop every mile and send up a rocket signal, wait 10 minutes for the road to be cleared of livestock, and continue.



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 07:47 AM
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originally posted by: seaswine
a reply to: TheRedneck

Best one I've heard for my state is

Any motorist driving along a country road at night must stop every mile and send up a rocket signal, wait 10 minutes for the road to be cleared of livestock, and continue.

Good golly!
What state is that?



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 07:47 AM
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On a slightly less quirky topic, it's illegal to carry a push dagger in Virginia UNLESS it is not concealed.

Of course nothing will get you stopped and frisked quite as quickly as strolling around with a Cold Steel Push dagger easily visible on your belt, though I doubt anyone here will scream 'KNIFE!'.



Now you can have a 6" fixed blade like a Kabar hunting knife on your belt and nobody cares, particularly in the rural Mid-Atlantic states, again, not concealed, and particularly if you're wearing 'fishing or hunting' attire.

It IS apparently legal to carry a concealed Ka-bar TDI knife on your belt since many officers also carry them (the 'bro-effect') and it's not technically defined as a push dagger.



What's ironic about this is that among defensive tools, a push dagger is pretty much the only knife that the elderly, females and small stature individuals can use effectively because it does not require a a lot of wrist strength to operate.

Of course the typical LEO is not very likely to confront or try to arrest or frisk an attractive female who is carrying any kind of knife since they think that's sexy and adorable (unless it's a militant female officer). To be serious, knife carrying 'offenses' are generally only pushed or added to charges if some other offense has been committed in the Officer's eyes (called pile-on charges).

FWIW

edit on 31-7-2019 by Maverick7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 08:12 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
  • Don't use x-rays to fit shoes in Washington unless you want a criminal charge.

  • Isn't this supposed to be a health issue? Fitting children's shoes by X-ray was all the rage when I was a child, and I had it done several times. I understand that it was stopped and probably banned because over-frequent x-rays were thought to damage growing feet even more than wrong-sized shoes. Just as luminous paint to mark the numbers on watch-dials got banned.
    I'm surprised, then, if Washington is the only state (or is it D.C.?) to make it illegal.



    posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 08:14 AM
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    Sure, make it against the law, that will stop it!

    Just like mugging, theft, murder, speeding, etc etc



    posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 08:22 AM
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    City Journal had an interesting piece on that full of links and videos. For a population that we're told so lives in fear of law enforcement because law enforcement is so racist, they seem to be terribly brazen and disrespectful.

    Do these look like kids who received the talk a go around with their heads down cowering in fear? How to write stupid laws indeed!



    posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 08:27 AM
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    originally posted by: GBP/JPY
    The worst isn't a funny one......

    Hemp....mj is really hemp. So to invent a verbal term for hemp....and have separate law a for that invented item is illegai.....stupid law to have to contrive a Mexican language lay term for it...

    In Texas, you only need a fishing license if ya have a reel on that pole.....


    I think that's standard in many states. I know you don't need a license to use a "cane" pole in FL.

    I think it goes back to a time where they didn't wand to pass legislation requiring someone to pay to feed themselves by fishing, and since it's not a big issue, why waste time and money to change it?



    posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 08:28 AM
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    Apparently, it is not actually legal to shoot a Welshman with a crossbow after midnight from the walls of Chester.

    However, until 1960, it was actually illegal not to carry out at least two hours of longbow practice a week according to the Unlawful Games Act 1541 which required every Englishman between the ages of 17 and 60 to own a longbow and practice archery.



    posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 08:31 AM
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    a reply to: oldcarpy
    It may still be illegal for a London cabbie not to carry a bale of hay for his horse.



    posted on Jul, 31 2019 @ 08:35 AM
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    a reply to: DISRAELI

    Judging from my experience it must be illegal for a cabbie to go south of the river "At this time of night", too.



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