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Another SR-71 thread

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posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 10:52 PM
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This was a badass plane to see in person. If you are ever over on the west coast I suggest you visit Boeings museum.


edit on 30-7-2019 by grey580 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 11:37 PM
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originally posted by: Barnalby
a reply to: pteridine

So JP-7 was basically the jet fuel equivalent of high-performance synthetic motor oil?


That is one way of describing it. It is a blend of fairly specific components that have been produced from petroleum by various processes and subsequent separations. These are combined in proper proportions to produce the fuel with desired characteristics.



posted on Aug, 4 2019 @ 04:11 AM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel

Wasn't there a large procurement of jp7 fuel a few years back that wasn't explained?



posted on Aug, 4 2019 @ 04:47 AM
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a reply to: pigsy2400

It was an awfully small amount for a truely operational program. It's likely it all went into hypersonics testing.
The thing to take away from that one however - the capability the produce JP7 still exists and fuel production for a classified program would obviously be classified as well.
edit on 4-8-2019 by mightmight because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2019 @ 04:52 AM
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a reply to: mightmight

Ahh thanks, I can remember reading it up a while back. Your explanation does make sense



posted on Aug, 5 2019 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: pteridine

So exactly like a synthetic oil. Cool stuff.

I'm honestly amazed that aircraft fuel has been more or less unchanged since the early 20th century. You'd think that in the name of efficiency and/or cleaner, more predictable burning, that there would be more JP-7 style synthetic fuel blends introduced to the market, but so far, you only really seem to see them in some corners of auto racing and, of course, the A-12 family of aircraft.



posted on Aug, 5 2019 @ 08:02 AM
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a reply to: mightmight

I remember hearing something here about how they never retired the JP-7 compatible KC-135s.



posted on Aug, 5 2019 @ 08:50 AM
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originally posted by: mightmight
a reply to: pigsy2400

It was an awfully small amount for a truely operational program. It's likely it all went into hypersonics testing.
The thing to take away from that one however - the capability the produce JP7 still exists and fuel production for a classified program would obviously be classified as well.


Don’t know if it still does but the u-2 also username jp7.



posted on Aug, 5 2019 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: B2StealthBomber

Really? In any case, one job of the remaining KC135Ts should be refueling the U-2s.



posted on Aug, 5 2019 @ 11:49 AM
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I visited the crash site of SR-71 #61-7965 in June. North of Fallon, NV



posted on Aug, 5 2019 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: Barnalby

No reason to. There are going to be other aircraft in the future that require non- JP8 fuel. The -135 will be around a long time still.



posted on Aug, 5 2019 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: Barnalby
a reply to: mightmight

I remember hearing something here about how they never retired the JP-7 compatible KC-135s.


I see one on "ADSB Exchange"/Flightaware once in a while.
#61-0320
If you Google that tail number, you can see a picture of it refueling an SR-71 on habu.org
It shows as being operated by the 418th Flight Test Squadron out of Edwards.
Every time I see it up, I wonder if it is refueling some test article.



posted on Aug, 5 2019 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: B2StealthBomber

They actually didn't. There's a reference to Jet Propellant Thermally Stable when talking about the fuel used during the Aquatone program, but the U-2 used JPTS MIL-F-25524. JP-7 was MIL-T 38219.




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