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Hay Day tomorrow

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posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 09:52 PM
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Well, it's that time of year, harvest season. Tomorrow I get to jump in the truck and get a whole bunch of blue-sky windshield time. Time to start hauling hay. Narrow roads and heavy loads. Probably drive 400+ miles tomorrow, easily 100 of those off-road. Hot transmissions, hot brakes...hot everything.

I'll be hauling (18) 755lb. bales per load, about 60+ miles one way. The bales are 3x3x8 feet. And I hope to get (4) loads tomorrow. Might have to pull off and sleep for a while somewhere on load #4. The loading part is easy (they do it), but the unloading part is a little harder because I have to unload and then stack in the barn. If I can get (72) bales put up tomorrow I'll be happy. That will be just over 27 tons.

My major dilemma is my first load will come from a supplier I haven't dealt with for 5 years. If his hay isn't up to snuff, I'll have to bail on that load and run over 150 miles in the other direction to get hay from my regular guy who is much further away. This is a much bigger operation if I have to do that. His bales are much larger, 4x3x9 and weigh over 1,000lbs. each. I can only get (12) of those bales on the trailer, and it's a much more difficult drive.

Every year, it's like this. It's not something I look forward to, and it's expensive, but it has to be done. And, it's hard work.

I have some horror stories too, which I will tell in Part II of this story.

--end Part 1--




posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:11 PM
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It isn't easy being a rancher or farmer. Not for those who are afraid of hard work.



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:13 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Well, it's that time of year, harvest season. Tomorrow I get to jump in the truck and get a whole bunch of blue-sky windshield time. Time to start hauling hay. Narrow roads and heavy loads. Probably drive 400+ miles tomorrow, easily 100 of those off-road. Hot transmissions, hot brakes...hot everything.

I'll be hauling (18) 755lb. bales per load, about 60+ miles one way. The bales are 3x3x8 feet. And I hope to get (4) loads tomorrow. Might have to pull off and sleep for a while somewhere on load #4. The loading part is easy (they do it), but the unloading part is a little harder because I have to unload and then stack in the barn. If I can get (72) bales put up tomorrow I'll be happy. That will be just over 27 tons.

My major dilemma is my first load will come from a supplier I haven't dealt with for 5 years. If his hay isn't up to snuff, I'll have to bail on that load and run over 150 miles in the other direction to get hay from my regular guy who is much further away. This is a much bigger operation if I have to do that. His bales are much larger, 4x3x9 and weigh over 1,000lbs. each. I can only get (12) of those bales on the trailer, and it's a much more difficult drive.

Every year, it's like this. It's not something I look forward to, and it's expensive, but it has to be done. And, it's hard work.

I have some horror stories too, which I will tell in Part II of this story.

--end Part 1--


You work pretty damn hard....

I don't know how you find the time.....

To keep bitching about it here to a bunch of losers....



Settle down, I know you don't get my humor and will likely take it "personal"....have fun bailing, hope it isn't in the 90's for you(like it is here).



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:14 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Well, it's that time of year, harvest season. Tomorrow I get to jump in the truck and get a whole bunch of blue-sky windshield time. Time to start hauling hay. Narrow roads and heavy loads. Probably drive 400+ miles tomorrow, easily 100 of those off-road. Hot transmissions, hot brakes...hot everything.

I'll be hauling (18) 755lb. bales per load, about 60+ miles one way. The bales are 3x3x8 feet. And I hope to get (4) loads tomorrow. Might have to pull off and sleep for a while somewhere on load #4. The loading part is easy (they do it), but the unloading part is a little harder because I have to unload and then stack in the barn. If I can get (72) bales put up tomorrow I'll be happy. That will be just over 27 tons.

My major dilemma is my first load will come from a supplier I haven't dealt with for 5 years. If his hay isn't up to snuff, I'll have to bail on that load and run over 150 miles in the other direction to get hay from my regular guy who is much further away. This is a much bigger operation if I have to do that. His bales are much larger, 4x3x9 and weigh over 1,000lbs. each. I can only get (12) of those bales on the trailer, and it's a much more difficult drive.

Every year, it's like this. It's not something I look forward to, and it's expensive, but it has to be done. And, it's hard work.

I have some horror stories too, which I will tell in Part II of this story.

--end Part 1--


I'm curious how much those large 4x3x9 bailes sell for. I think those are near the size our bailes are but I think our bales are near a ton and may be a little larger, or the material is heavier? It is just regular field grass, a mixture of different natural grasses and I think we get about 50-60 bales per cutting, 3x a year. The thing is I've never asked about pricing as I don't deal with that and I'd rather not get involved. I know it varies for the type of bale, but what are some common ranges for bales that size.

What do you feed, cows or horses or what?



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:21 PM
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--part II--

I spoke of 'narrow roads and heavy loads' and some 'horror stories'. Here's one of the more memorable ones...

I was fully loaded and heading south, back home, last August. I was actually overloaded on our old trailer (probably 3k over). I was pulling a long hill on broken asphalt pavement, and getting beaten to death in the process (it's a miserable stretch of 2 lane asphalt with no shoulder and deep ditches on either side). The broken asphalt ends right at the county line, almost as an insult between the two counties. I had an oilfield semi bearing down hard behind me, and I was trying to go as fast as I could. I was probably pulling about 55mph and the turbos were wide open (think: black smoke).

I had about a mile to go to the county line which was both the top of the hill, and the end of the broken pavement.

I crested the top of the hill and the ride smoothed out (thank Gawd), and I started to gain speed. There was a small rise in the road in front of me, and I'd been over it many times. Normally I'd accelerate down the small slope and not have to lug up over the rise. I did the same this time.

I got to the top of the rise at the crest of the hill and I saw something in front of me...and it was moving slow! OH S#!

Now, I drove tractor trailers for a living in college so crisis situations were not something to panic over. I lifted off the throttle, knowing not to brake at that weight, and looked into my side mirror to pull out and go around. To my utter shock and dismay there was a rural Fire Department brush fire Humvee right next to me passing, lights and sirens blaring. Never even heard or saw them (too wide).

I had no where to go!!! So I quickly tapped the brakes three times to warn the trucker behind me and it was hard on the brakes! 70...60...50...I'm not going to be able to stop! JEEZUS, it's a small tractor on the road!!! Trailer brakes started locking up, started to lose the trailer out from behind me. I just had no choice!! ...40...30...my worst fears were coming true! All five axles locked up and smoking. I'm going to skid right into this guy!

So, I started to head for the ditch on the right (which would be a certain rollover for me). The semi behind me was now almost jackknifed and sliding. I held on to the last second before aborting into the ditch.

Miraculously (I mean serious miracle here!) I manged to slow down enough just a couple of feet behind the rolling tractor, and was able to swerve left into the opposite lane around him.

A wave of shock and anger shot over me at the same time, as I went around this guy...and then I saw something which absolutely blew my mind! Literally almost stopped my heart!

On the tractor was an old man, driving this vintage old John Deere tractor down the highway..........with his toddler grandson sitting on his lap!!!!!!! I'm not kidding you! The old dude just pulled out on the highway in front of us, on a blind hill, on a 65mph highway...with his grandson....AND HE NEVER EVEN SAW ME!!! (until I went around his left side). Just completely oblivious to what had just happened!!

Next wide spot in the road I had to pull over and just sit there for a while to calm down.

Now folks, lemme' tell ya...that was one TERRIFYING moment!!



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:26 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

We usually try to buy Orchard or Teff. We stay away from the stemmy brome and field grass (our cows won't eat it).

4x3x9's usually run about 1,100-1,200 lbs. a piece and cost about $110/bale. Cheaper by the ton if you buy it at auction but you never know what you're getting. We're all grass fed here, so quality is important and we'll pay more.



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

No worries, man. I know you're just kidding.

Why tell it here? Heck, who else will listen, right? Otherwise, it's just another boring truck ride and a bunch of hard work and sweat in silence. I guess the cows appreciate it...I think.

It's a slice of life some don't get to see, so I thought I'd share. No sense keeping it to the grave, right?

ETA - And hey, .... "Beef, it's what's for Dinner!" ...Might as well let a few people know what goes into that steak!


edit on 7/26/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:31 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: MisterSpock

No worries, man. I know you're just kidding.

Why tell it here? Heck, who else will listen, right? Otherwise, it's just another boring truck ride and a bunch of hard and sweat in silence. I guess the cows appreciated it...I think.

It's a slice of life some don't get to see, so I thought I'd share. No sense keeping it to the grave, right?



It's an outlet, I do the same.

Then again if I had some cows to talk to I might post less......



Atleast you have more "people" to talk to than most of us.



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:35 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

I think I get along better with my dogs and my cows than I do with most people!

At least I sort of know what they're going to do.

People? Sheesh...it's anyone's guess!



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 10:49 PM
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You know, you get to see a lot of pretty country with all that windshield time. Get to see a lot of things people just don't get to see everyday. And, not a day goes by when I don't appreciate that.

My world is this great dichotomy. I work (near the end of my career) in the highest tech world imaginable during the day, and come home every night to the most basic and simple life imaginable. It grounds me, in an odd sort of way. It is "balance" beyond all other.

I marvel at the complete complete silence at night, I marvel at the stars and no light pollution. In the day, I live in one of the loudest worlds imaginable, jet engines roaring and a ballet of danger, chaos and unpredictability. A world where something smaller than a human hair means the difference between life and death. A world where stress and pressure is just never ending.

So, I kind of identify with the cows, at the end of the day. They don't have any complicated questions, just a clear path of hard work to see they are taken care of.

I can live with that.



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 11:24 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

We usually try to buy Orchard or Teff. We stay away from the stemmy brome and field grass (our cows won't eat it).

4x3x9's usually run about 1,100-1,200 lbs. a piece and cost about $110/bale. Cheaper by the ton if you buy it at auction but you never know what you're getting. We're all grass fed here, so quality is important and we'll pay more.



I guess weight really depends on the weather before and during cutting/bailing. I've seen times when bales seemed to weigh 20% more and times they weighed ~10% less than average.

If the grass is cut and dried for 3-5 days in hot, clear days, then bailed, it going to be more grass than if you have wetter grass (for whatever reason) when it is baled, so you may end up with 10 bales per field vs 12 if if is wetter. Do you see what I mean?

The dry grass can be compressed more and weighs less, but it's the same nutrient, the cows just need more water. So the farmer can really manipulate the quality of the bales if they wanted to.

Do you check total/average moisture per bale? Ever have any rot on you?



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 11:27 PM
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The wheat harvest near my home town is fantastic this year! I love harvest time.

WHAT ABOUT THE #242? (I can't remember her number- the pregnant cow)



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl
FCD, I enjoy your posts. I followed your July post about a new calf. I am with KansasGirl, what is the status? I am dying to know.



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 02:24 AM
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You truly live the life of Riley
Enjoy.



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 04:56 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Would it be financially viable to grow and bale your own hay? I know equipment is expensive, but as much as you're spending on purchase and transport (not to mention the time involved) it might be more feasible. Haven't kept up with your posts enough to know your soil conditions but surely you have the acreage for it?



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 06:07 AM
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a reply to: GeauxHomeYoureDrunk

We have the acreage for it, but unfortunately none of it is flat (or not flat enough to run harvesting equipment over it). So, we do grow natural grasses which we feed the cattle on and rotate pastures so the grasses stay healthy. We still have to augment our pastures in the winter months so they don't get depleted, hence the hay hauling during hay season. It's all for winter feed.


edit on 7/27/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 05:54 PM
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originally posted by: GeauxHomeYoureDrunk
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Would it be financially viable to grow and bale your own hay? I know equipment is expensive, but as much as you're spending on purchase and transport (not to mention the time involved) it might be more feasible. Haven't kept up with your posts enough to know your soil conditions but surely you have the acreage for it?


A friend of mine, his parents own a piece of gorgeous land in western Maryland. They have a cottage there where they go on weekends- it's fabulous. But anyway, their neighbor raises cattle, and my friend's folks let him use their meadows to grow his hay. In exchange for that, he keeps the grounds kept during the winter and checks on the house, etc. It's fun to visit on weekends in the summer and watch the fields get taller and taller with whatever mix of grasses he uses. I think he actually grows and harvests twice each summer.

TLDR: good suggestion!



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 05:55 PM
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HEY!' FCD!! What's going on with the calf?!



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 11:58 PM
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originally posted by: KansasGirl
HEY!' FCD!! What's going on with the calf?!


Come on please tell us. Inquiring minds want to know!



posted on Jul, 28 2019 @ 01:00 AM
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originally posted by: Onlyyouknow

originally posted by: KansasGirl
HEY!' FCD!! What's going on with the calf?!


Come on please tell us. Inquiring minds want to know!


See, FCD? It's not just me who wants to know! I'm just the only one harassing you 😂




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