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Asteroid about 100 metres in diameter - Traveling 24 kilometres a second has just missed the Earth

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posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:19 PM
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An asteroid about 100 metres in diameter and racing at 24 kilometres a second has just missed the Earth.

The rock, called Asteroid 2019 OK, sped by our planet at 11.22am on Thursday, passing within about 70,000 kilometres – which is a long way away but closer to us than the moon’s orbit.

The day Earth had a near-miss with a 'city-killer' asteroid


No one saw it coming because of it's trajectory. It was traveling to the Earth from behind the Sun. Any body passing inside the orbit of the moon concerns me. Glad I didn't know it was coming.

It could be the largest body to come that close in a while and without doubt the largest this year. It was not as big as the one that took out the dinosaurs, but big enough to take out a city.



edit on 25-7-2019 by LookingAtMars because: speeeling




posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:33 PM
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That distance is only about 1/5 of the distance between Earth and the moon.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

That is pretty darn close. The scariest part is that no one saw it coming though!



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:40 PM
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It seems to me that the he long term damage might be greater if something like that but the moon.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: incoserv

I bet you are right.

I can think of all kinds of bad things that would cause.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:47 PM
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100 meters?

Lets be real ok?

That wouldnt hardly have done a damn thing.

The area it wouldve hit probably would see something on par with a nuke, MAYBE.. but lets be real...

With the size of earth, I could almost guarantee it wouldnt have hit a populated area..

and even if it was heading in that direction.. the minute it wouldve hit our atmosphere it wouldve burned up and disintegrated to half the size if not less.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: Lucidparadox

You sure? At 24 kilometers a second I think it cold do a lot of damage.



edit on 25-7-2019 by LookingAtMars because: I don't use meters




posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:57 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Dude.....dang......Ya get scared even if you are a Jesus follower....I'm getting scared....

The trajectory was unknown? Dang



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: Lucidparadox
100 meters?

Lets be real ok?

That wouldnt hardly have done a damn thing.

The area it wouldve hit probably would see something on par with a nuke, MAYBE.. but lets be real...

With the size of earth, I could almost guarantee it wouldnt have hit a populated area..

and even if it was heading in that direction.. the minute it wouldve hit our atmosphere it wouldve burned up and disintegrated to half the size if not less.
also like the 1908 one....Tunguska event....hehe....SP



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 08:02 PM
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Certainly emphasizes the danger of objects approaching in the direction of the Sun. There was only a 2 day notice, and while 70,000km is still a safe distance, that was only 48 minutes of flight time away from a hit. Very Scary.

Chelyabinsk also came in from the direction of the Sun and there was no warning at all. IF that was as big as this thing...
there would have been a lot of death in those smaller villages.
edit on 25-7-2019 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

I question the 2 day notice. The media didn't give any notice till after the event. Whats up with that?



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 08:10 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
a reply to: charlyv

I question the 2 day notice. The media didn't give any notice till after the event. Whats up with that?


Hear that. Some serious communications problems there and zero responsibility getting that data to where it needed to go.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: Lucidparadox

you are kidding right?!
Do you remember what happened not long ago in Russia?
Windows exploding out, buildings shaking to the core, and that was a small one.

100 meters across and traveling at that speed, truly carried some devastating potential.

ETA: quoting from the article, if it had hit, it would of carried the equivalent to 30 times the nuclear explosion of Hiroshima.
edit on 25-7-2019 by Macenroe82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 08:37 PM
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Has anyone analyzed if the asteroids coming from behind the sun are related to a bigger object coming from that same direction?



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 08:44 PM
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originally posted by: ATSAlex
Has anyone analyzed if the asteroids coming from behind the sun are related to a bigger object coming from that same direction?


They can come from any direction, but most will arrive from some point on the ecliptic plane. And yes, the possibility of some traveling as "guests" of a bigger mass is entirely possible.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 09:04 PM
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This one kind of snuck up behind our orbital direction. Imagine one coming in head-on to our orbital direction. You can add the speed of Earth at 30 km/s for one hell of an overall impact speed.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 09:13 PM
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"Next time, Kardashians, next time ..." - God



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 09:24 PM
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Why would it scare anyone? There isn't a darned thing we can do about it. If it happens, it happens. What if Yellowstone blows? What if someone drops a nuke on a large city or an EMP that takes out our entire power grid? If something like that happens, who ever is left will have to deal with the aftermath. Of course that would be horrific, survival instincts would kick in and we'd be left with an everyone-for-themselves scenario.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 09:30 PM
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originally posted by: HalWesten
Why would it scare anyone? There isn't a darned thing we can do about it. If it happens, it happens. What if Yellowstone blows? What if someone drops a nuke on a large city or an EMP that takes out our entire power grid? If something like that happens, who ever is left will have to deal with the aftermath. Of course that would be horrific, survival instincts would kick in and we'd be left with an everyone-for-themselves scenario.


In the case of asteroids and comets, with enough warning time we can develop a defense against some of them. It is a very difficult endeavor, as things have to be perched and ready on a minutes notice.

Look at all of the money we pour into getting the drop on another countries missile launches... The Earth is a dangerous place to live.



posted on Jul, 25 2019 @ 10:33 PM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
a reply to: Lucidparadox

you are kidding right?!
Do you remember what happened not long ago in Russia?
Windows exploding out, buildings shaking to the core, and that was a small one.

100 meters across and traveling at that speed, truly carried some devastating potential.

ETA: quoting from the article, if it had hit, it would of carried the equivalent to 30 times the nuclear explosion of Hiroshima.


Yeah, that's a massive amount of kinetic energy.

Both the recent and the 1908 events were "glancing" strikes I beleive. The damage would have been exponentially worse with a direct mass on mass hit.

For the poster that "gauranteed" it wouldn't hit a populated area, that is irrelevant. The ecological damage, in terms of possible nuclear winter, or firestorms, or even possible triggering of volcanic activity could be devestating.




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