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Houses Passes Ammendment Questioning Penatagon About Weaponizing Ticks

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posted on Jul, 17 2019 @ 11:14 PM
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a reply to: waftist

When I was a kid, we didn't think anything about getting tick bites, but now we're learning that there are all kinds of illnesses being spread by ticks that maybe we weren't aware of before?


As new diseases emerge and some ticks expand their ranges, US public health authorities find themselves unprepared to deal with steady increases in infections, according to the CDC. The newest data summary indicates that the number of tickborne infections in the United States has doubled between 2004 and 2016 from 22 527 to 48 610. Several of these infections were caused by emerging tickborne pathogens newly discovered in the United States, including the Heartland virus, Powassan virus, and Bourbon virus. This trend is continuing with a record-breaking 59 349 cases of tickborne illnesses reported to the CDC in 2017, based on data from the Notifiable Disease Surveillance System.


While I personally know people who have suffered from Lyme disease and meat allergies caused by ticks, I just had a friend who ended up in the hospital for 4 days just in the last few weeks. Two of the viruses listed above have caused people to die in my state.

Is advanced medicine just making us more aware of illnesses caused by ticks?

Another change I've noticed over the last two decades is the number of people I know with autoimmune disorders. Are ticks more apt to infect people with these disorders? What's with all of the immunity problems?

It's hard to say what specifically caused the doubled increase in tick borne diseases between 2004 - 2016.




posted on Jul, 17 2019 @ 11:18 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: waftist

Coincidence?

Red meat allergy caused by ticks. Extremist Vegan biological warfare?


Yep, I posted in that discussion five years ago. It's gotten much worse since then given what I posted. I should look into the red meat allergy and see if it is going up like Lyme disease has here in Michigan.



posted on Jul, 17 2019 @ 11:18 PM
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I'm pretty sure that our increased susceptibility to tick borne diseases is because some food chemistry blocks our ability to fight it initially, while other chemistry needed to increase immunity is missing from our food. Chickens eat ticks, these chickens have eggs that have antigens to diseases in the environment. the laying chickens that are couped up in big commercial buildings never see a tick, so their eggs do not possess immunity antigens that trigger us to fight these diseases. But most people in cities never even contact a tick or mosquito so it does not matter to them.



posted on Jul, 18 2019 @ 04:22 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

Yup, I'm in Arizona now and several people have told me that the ticks have gotten much worse here.



posted on Jul, 18 2019 @ 06:22 AM
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a reply to: watchitburn

I find that disturbing because I was under the impression that ticks need leaf litter and moist conditions to live and breed. Scary thought that dry desert like conditions aren't a barrier to the spread of ticks.

One study showed that an adult tick can remain dormant without finding a host for as much as two years without dying. They sure are tough critters, but to survive and spread in Arizona is truly scary to me.

Do you know what particular species of ticks are showing up over there?
edit on 18-7-2019 by MichiganSwampBuck because: Typo



posted on Jul, 18 2019 @ 07:10 AM
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originally posted by: xuenchen
Looks like some people are ticked off 😎


The ones with ticks in their dicks even more so!!!


puppy dogs falling over themselves, making cutesy puppy dog sounds, tails wagging.
kittehs going mental chasing a red dot, paws everywhere..

Anything, Anything but the imagery playing in my head... O.o



posted on Jul, 18 2019 @ 07:44 AM
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I had a tick on my belly last year. It couldn't have been on for more than 3 or 4 hours before noticed and removed it (I was napping when it got me). The next day I started having what looked like the bullseye mark that usually signifies Lyme disease, so I went to the clinic.

Before the doctor saw me he started telling me that it was highly unlikely I contracted Lyme disease with the brief exposure I had and that I shouldn't worry about it, blah blah blah. But then he said, "Let's take a look, just in case" and as soon as he saw my belly his whole demeanor changed to, "Let's get you on some antibiotics and so on" lol

When in doubt, get checked out!



posted on Jul, 18 2019 @ 08:47 AM
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originally posted by: BomSquad
I had a tick on my belly last year. It couldn't have been on for more than 3 or 4 hours before noticed and removed it (I was napping when it got me). The next day I started having what looked like the bullseye mark that usually signifies Lyme disease, so I went to the clinic.

Before the doctor saw me he started telling me that it was highly unlikely I contracted Lyme disease with the brief exposure I had and that I shouldn't worry about it, blah blah blah. But then he said, "Let's take a look, just in case" and as soon as he saw my belly his whole demeanor changed to, "Let's get you on some antibiotics and so on" lol

When in doubt, get checked out!


Scary indeed when you are told it takes up to 24 hours for a tick bite to infect you with Lyme disease. That is really good information to have, that in some cases it might only take a few hours to become infected after a tick begins to bite. Once again, the best and likely only course of action is to avoid exposure to ticks and use protective measures when out in the woods.

There are landscaping designs to help keep them away from your home and yard areas. Of course, keeping tick infested animals away are a good first step in addition to planting tick repelling plants and other landscaping techniques to avoid exposure.



posted on Jul, 18 2019 @ 07:46 PM
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A cousin of mine was being headhunted for admittance to Harvard, Yale, etc. and finally settled on Stanford.

Then he got a brain infection likely from a tick. He survived, but is showing signs of a repeat infection. This headline made me think of him, and if it’s true...I’m going to be supremely pissed to think it may be due to experimentation and negligence.



posted on Jul, 18 2019 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: RandomPerson

I am sorry to hear of that and yea diagnosis, especially later is hard to nail down it seems. This "questioning" will either quietly fade away or enough people will come forward demanding answers. CDC estimates 300,000 people a year may get this disease, and those are the reported ones, and from 2005-2010. The total numbers may be tens of millions in actuality. It will be interesting to see how this unfolds and at the very least more attention will be given to the subject and therefor more funding and research.



posted on Jul, 18 2019 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: Deetermined


It's hard to say what specifically caused the doubled increase in tick borne diseases between 2004 - 2016.

I hear you and I suspect part of it is better diagnosing and awareness and part may be an increase in ticks and therefore bites. I noticed after 2012 at the home I resided in for a decade, that ants and mosquitoes started showing up in February when it was still cold outside. I had never seen that where I lived, and I payed attention to such things because I was the one to begin defending against ants every spring. The mosquitoes make themselves obvious, and I would see them out when smoking cigs...in February.

I looked into it and what some of the pest control sites were saying was that climate change had increased the surface of the earth in minute degrees, but enough for insects to continue breeding and thus beginning their regular springtime activities, even in winter. This was out in Oregon and the neighbors were talking about ants and skeeters too. Then the rat population exploded in 2016-17, making the news. I'm afraid things will get worse as far as conducive conditions for critter and pest populations.



posted on Jul, 19 2019 @ 06:28 AM
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a reply to: waftist

Lyme disease is relatively new isn't it..?

Quite possible, if not probable that militaries around the world have experimented with the most practical way to disperse a virus or disease on a population.

Possibly also why there are several diseases similar to Lyme around the world, in nations that discourage any belief that the disease is present (such as Australia, where many cases have turned up, yet the official stance is that the disease does not exist here). Stands to reason that the US and it's allies would test their weapons on multiple populations for wider data returns.



posted on Jul, 29 2019 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: waftist

These work. Get them out quick without panicking them so they don't puke the disease into you.
https://tickkey.com/




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